This Week in Ontario Edublogs

Welcome to another Friday and a collection of wonderful blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers.


A virtual climb of Mt. Kilimanjaro – Join Us!

Here’s something that everyone can get involved with at home. Paul McGuire was planning to climb Mount Kilimanjaro this summer. Obviously, that’s out given our current situation.

But, like many activities that would normally be done in real life, Paul and his Christie Lake Kids team have gone virtual and they want you to join them.

No, not there, but your location.

Each day for seven days we will put out to those who are interested 1) a step count that approximates the steps you would take on that particular day (8-10,000 steps); 2) a commentary embedded for you to listen to that goes over what that day on the trail is like;  3) a video log of that day by Arienne Parzei; 4) a conditioning follow-along video by Chase Tucker; 5) some music to inspire you for your day; 6) some Kilimanjaro interesting facts and; 7) a fun African recipe.

Why wouldn’t you do it? Or at least part of it?

Remember – “Communities move mountains”


Saying, “I am not racist” is not enough pt 1
Saying, “I am not racist” is not enough pt 2

From the ETFO Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning blog, there are a couple of posts from Will Gourley.

This is a very transparent and open commentary on what we all are experiencing in our communities and watching news on television.

In the first blog post, Will shares what he considers his level of privilege. I suspect that many of you will be nodding your head in agreement with his observations.

In the second blog post, he outlines what he plans to do personally about things. It’s an admirable plan.

Throughout, he makes the very valid case of the difference between “I am not racist” and “I am anti-racist”.


The Future of eLearning

Staying with the Heart and Art Blog, Deborah Weston shares her thoughts about eLearning and our future.

Given that we are at a time in history where a pandemic is pushing school work onto eLearning platforms, I can see growth in the technology of eLearning platforms for many students.

Nobody chose to have us where we currently stand. But, teachers have answered the call and are doing the very best that they can given limited professional learning, access to technology for themselves and students, lack of preparedness for the variety of tools, privacy, security, etc.

As she notes, there is an absolute flaw in Ontario’s implementation of Online Learning. For years, we’ve embraced and worked with the notion that one solution isn’t appropriate for all students. Yet, Online Learning is forcing many to back off and try to make that notion fit.

The ultimate solution can’t be a memo from Mowat Block. It needs to seriously listen to parents, students, teachers, and administrators. There is no one size fits all solution here.

I believe that school districts, federations, and subject associations need to step up and provide professional learning opportunities for addressing classrooms effectively in the fall. When you consider that the typical teacher studies for one or two years at a Faculty of Education, a few hours at the end of the summer just doesn’t seem appropriate. Teaching is a profession of continuous growth and learning and needs to be respected at this time.


Good Will: it’s what holds the education system together

This is a very personal post from Tim King. Tim share the mathematics of his own involving salary, hours worked, hours volunteered, and professional growth taken.

Despite all this, teaching position have been lost. The current scoreboard is available here.

I think that any teacher who reads this post will share a feeling of the same story in their career. Teaching isn’t a 9-5 job with other hours left for other things.

Teaching is a commitment not only to the learning of students but also to the interactions with those students to prepare them for their future lives. Throw in marking, lesson preparation, and all of the other activities that happen outside of the physical school and you get the picture.

All this for 1% while Members of Provincial Parliament vote themselves a cost of living raise!


W is for Wonder

Lynn Thomas is still working on the alphabet!

This is actually quite a long blog post with a great deal of thought and contemplation on her part – obviously aimed at wondering what the upcoming school year will look like.

In particular, she addresses

  • What will school look like in September?
  • How will mental health and well being – of students and teachers – be supported?
  • What about equity?

As Stephen Hurley noted in our radio show – curiouser and curiouser. Lynn does a terrific job of expanding and sharing her thoughts on each wonder.

To Lynn’s well-thought-through list, I would add another …

Are School Districts and is the Ministry of Education prepared to fund any solution so that it’s done properly with the interests of students foremost?


Dad’s Gold

Melanie White adds her thoughts about her husband in this entry to the Our Dad Shoes blog post.

The post is a heart-warming collection of stories – even this Minnesota Vikings fan could cut some slack with the Green Bay Packers construction helmet logo.

I can’t help but be moved by the personal family stories about how they got to where they are today and the character(s) her husband assumed to help in difficult circumstances.

May her boys always honour this

The boys see his tenacity, his unwavering commitment to them, and he knows their teasing is loving kindness. But they don’t know that their dad is an alchemist who transforms the unimaginable into living gold.


No Title

For me, the power in Matthew Morris’ posts lies in the stories that he tells through his lens. I’ve mentioned many times; I can have empathy but can never fully understand his reality. His posts do help with that.

It’s easy to listen to podcasts or to read blog posts from people sharing what a wonderful job that they’re doing in this very difficult time.

But things have become more difficult

These teachers don’t literally kneel on the necks of children but some suffocate them of future opportunity by their mere position of privilege and power and pretentiousnes

As Matthew notes, school are grounded in what they consider stability. I think he makes an argument for serious consideration when he compares the stability of education with the stability of society.

You need to read and ponder the points in this post.


I hope that you can find time to read through all of these posts. You will learning something from each of them.

Then, follow these bloggers on Twitter.

  • Paul McGuire – @mcguirp
  • Will Gourley – @WillGourley
  • Deborah Weston – @dr_weston_PhD
  • Tim King – @tk1ng
  • Lynn Thomas – @THOMLYNN101
  • Melanie White – @whiteroomradio
  • Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorris

This post comes from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

Author: dougpete

The content of this blog is generated by whatever strikes my fancy at any given point. It might be computers, weather, political, or something else in nature. I experiment and comment a lot on things so don't take anything here too seriously; I might change my mind a day later but what you read is my thought and opinion at the time I wrote it! My personal website is at: http://www.dougpeterson.ca Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dougpete I'm bookmarking things at: http://www.diigo.com/user/dougpete

2 thoughts on “This Week in Ontario Edublogs”

Comments are closed.