This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Welcome to another Friday and countdown to the early spring predicted by Wiarton Willie. Enjoy some great blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers as you count.


Gearing Up for MST with a Master Storyteller

In these COVID days, you would understand how someone might lose their enthusiasm for doing extraordinary things. That’s anything but the case for Noa Daniels and this post shows just what extraordinary might look like.

She and her grade 8 students have partnered with Lucky Budd about storytelling. This is kind of amazing to think that this would happen but why not.

In the post, Noa describes everything and it sounds pretty awesome. It’s also not the sort of one of that’s done over a weekend. You’ll have to read to get the complete details.

Her students are also appreciative about what’s going on. Here’s a sampling of the comments from students

  • I thought it was cool how the story connected with the 3 rivers in BC: the Skeena, the Nass, and the Stikine
  • I found it very interesting and I really liked how you paused during the story to add suspense. Thank you for taking the time to share your experience and telling us about how you got into storytelling.
  • I think it’s very inspiring that although the first time you tried to publish a book it didn’t happen but that didn’t stop you from trying.
  • I also really liked the suspense and sound effects you added when you were telling the story. It was really fun listening and you have such a cool vibe!

The complete story is in her post which makes it well worth the read.


I Want to Break Free!

Here’s a sentiment from Richard Erdmann that we all want to experience. Even the notion of going mall walking which, quite honestly, I never particularly care for takes on new importance simply be the fact that we are prohibited from doing it. In my case, I actually miss shopping with my wife who actually touches everything that she might be interested in purchasing. It drives me crazy. When we get the chance to do it again, I think I’m going to have a different outlook.

Cabin fever and stir crazy are two things that I can definitely related to. These days, the highlight is going outside to walk the dog which fortunately is still ok within the rules.

Richard’s situation is a lot more serious and his notion that he is not only missing the experiences but that he’s being robbed of them will give you pause and a chance to empathise.

I don’t know what else to say, Richard, other than to agree with you that we will eventually get through this. Let’s hope that it’s soon. Numbers across the province continue to show promise.


Stress and The Evolving Teenaged Brain: A Study in Contrasts

From the self regulation blog comes an interesting post from John Hoffman. Regular readers here will recall a post I made last week about a group of teenagers who felt robbed that they were not able to get their driver’s licenses.

I remember thinking, at the time, that their logic wasn’t rational – everyone is paying the price during the lockdown. Maybe now I can cut a little slack when, according to John, their rational mind isn’t fully matured until age 25.

But he notes the research that indicates that the teenage mind is specially vulnerable to excess stress. If what we’re living through doesn’t meet that criteria, I don’t know what would.

All this leads to the announcement of an upcoming course specially for this age group through the Merit Centre – Feeling Stress: A Self-Reg Mini-Course for Teens.


What I’ve learned from being a Virtual Teacher so far

I’m hoping that Amy Bowker’s “so far” doesn’t extend too much further and that any more learning comes from reflection.

She does a really good job of identifying her thoughts and feelings about teaching during these times. It’s sad but predictable that students are just plain disappearing by turning off camera or microphones or just not showing up. I can’t imagine the stress on the teacher who needs to mediate those actions.

As I read through Amy’s post, the word “communication” kept popping up. It lies in the answer to so many things that she addresses. Social cues, working with parents, retention and engagement all can be addressed with effective and ongoing communication.

All of it seems so simple until you realize that a teacher doesn’t have all the tools available that she would have in a face to face classroom.

Regardless, there are powerful observations in her post with lots of ideas and a plan for the future.


Per / Con / In / Re – form

Another great post comes from Will Gourley on the Heart and Art Blog. I can’t help but think immediately – are there any other words that end in “form”?

In the post, Will shares his observations on each of these. Each of these words take on a paragraph and you feel the weight of each of these on him personally. In football terms, I would call it “piling on”.

There’s real wisdom is this quote. Pause and think about your own reality as you read this.

I worry that too much emphasis has been placed on performance and conformity without serious consideration to being fully informed of the true social, emotional, and physical costs of virtual learning. 

I can’t help but think that the emphasis part is easy because it can be summarized with a visual checklist. The other part is so difficult to understand and address. Yet, it’s so important.

Thanks, Will, for summarising these “forms” so nicely.


Why Code Illusions?

It’s a question asked of Peter Skillen as a lead in to this activity.

My response is “Why not code illusions?”

If we believe in the power of programming, then we should never question a good premise for a programmed solution.

In this case, Peter introduces us to a nice visualization of an optical illusion that I’m sure you’ve seen many times. You may actually have created the illusion yourself. You may have pulled out a ruler to prove that it is indeed an illusion.

Peter doesn’t provide a solution but it’s relatively easy to program, especially if you take a good look and analysis of the animation that he provides. Of course, I’m not going to include it here; you’ll have to visit Peter’s post to see it for yourself.


Sick Days for All

From Deborah Weston, a bit of a sobering post dealing with sick days. Much has been said about sick days for teachers, particularly how they don’t take them since it’s more work to prepare lessons for someone else than to drag yourself in to work.

We see the messages everywhere these days.

If you have a fever, shortage of breath, or a temperature, please do not enter.

Advice about this also applies to the workplace.

If your collective agreement has provision for sick days of some sort, it makes staying at home easier.

But that doesn’t apply to all. Deborah has done incredible research on this topic and pulls back the curtain to reveal the impact of no sick days.

  • Put Workers at Risk
  • Spread of Illness to Communities and Workplaces
  • Impacts Parents and Guardians
  • Women Face Labour Inequity
  • and more

She fleshes out each of these and ends the post with a true call to action to her readers.

Devote some time to this and you’ll find another counter to the simple statement “We’re all in this together”. Really?


These are terrific and thoughtful blog posts. Please take the time to click through and read them all. Then, follow these bloggers on Twitter. (and follow their blogs too!)

  • Noa Daniels – @noasbobs
  • Richard Erdmann – @rerdmann
  • John Hoffman – @UncommonJohn
  • Amy Bowker – @amyebowker
  • W!ll Gourley – @WillGourley
  • Peter Skillen – @peterskillen
  • Deborah Weston – @DPAWestonPhD

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


I’m still saddened by the lack of Hallowe’en things in parts of the province as laid out by the Premier last week. Hallowe’en is the last fun event before Christmas and was always a day that I looked forward to as a child. Even in areas like around here where we aren’t the recipient of the mandate from him, everyone is encouraged to find alternatives.

Since it’s a Friday, I’d like to share with you some great blog posts that I read recently and would encourage you to check them out yourselves. As always, if you’re an Ontario Edublogger, let me know; I’d love to add you to the collection.


Why “Time” Matters …

If you follow Aviva Dunsiger on social media, you know that this time of year, she follows the “Snails Across the Curriculum” resource. Amidst all this, she shares a story about the importance of time and how she and her partner are reminding each other to slow down so that students have more time on task.

It’s an interesting piece of advice but I’d like to see it further extended that their classroom.

Personally, in these COVID days, I find myself rushed all the time. And for no particular reason. In normal times, I linger while grocery shopping and I impulse buy; I like to browse the aisles at the LCBO; and, as I’ll talk about later, I’ll spend all kinds of time wandering bookstores when we’re at the mall.

These days, though, there’s none of that. I’ve got the floor plans of any place I’m going in to memorized and I’m basically in and out with what I had planned to do. Nothing more or nothing less. I haven’t even experimented with a new wine.

Aviva’s post and her stories about snails have got me doing a personal reality check. Maybe it’s time to slow down a bit and think about what I’m missing while I’m in such a rush. The things we learn from snails.


Month 1: Done

For Lisa Corbett, the month of September flew past. I’m hearing the same thing from all kinds of people. With all the angst that abounds, schools are now in the second month of the educational year.

Time flies when you’re having fun!

She shares some of the ways that she plans for curriculum – on her own and with personal experiences – and some of the things that have been covered in the mathematics classroom. I was a bit surprised when she talked about the use of manipulatives; many others are finding more pen and paper ways of doing things. But, we know from past experience that there’s so much more insight that can be had with hands-on activities. Yet, it’s not life as usual with them as she describes the nightly routine that she goes through to make sure they’re disinfected for the next day.

Next up – robots from the Education Centre. I wonder how you sterilize a robot?


How are you doing? Making time to check in

As I read this post from Jennifer Casa-Todd, I was reminded of an incident in my first or second year of teaching. I was walking outside the English hallway and met one of the teachers.

Me: “How are you doing?”

Him: “Why? Do you really care?”

I don’t recall what my response was but I hope that I was nice. I shared the experience with a colleague who left me know “Oh, that’s so and so”. He’s like that.

For me, it was never like that before or since. The moment still sticks with me as a result.

I still will asked people how they’re doing when I run into them. I do kind of care.

Jennifer’s post reminds us that it’s important to do these check-ins and they’re obviously much more serious these days. She shares her thoughts about the importance of doing this and also a Google document template that you can borrow and modify to make it unique to you. It’s certain to take on more importance as more classes go online. She’ll even take you to the level of mindfulness and its importance.

I hope that it’s reciprocated and that friends and colleagues are also checking in on Jennifer.


Cataloging and Comprehending

I felt compelled to include this post from Melanie White since she mentioned me! and also came down on the side of Elizabeth Lyons and centred writing!

But, I’ll be honest; I’ve read the post probably a dozen times and I’m sure that the message that she intends still eludes me.

Despite that, there still were some takeaways for me – I now know the word “chiasmus” although I’m not sure how I’d use it – and I really like the paradox that she talks about with her Grade 12 students and

the ability to intellectually hold two contradictory ideas which can both be simultaneously true;

That pretty much sums up two party politics in a nutshell.

Maybe if I’d become a librarian, I would have had some better insights to the rest of her post!


Impact/Moments

Speaking of Elizabeth Lyons, this post outlines another cheat of hers in the “one word” for the year activity that many educators take on. She’s already diverged by insisting on “one word” per month for 2020 except for October where she’s taking on the two words in the title to the post.

And she rationalizes it nicely.

Imagine being a teacher-librarian in a school. In a normal year, you’re fully booked with classes coming in for research, book exchange, readings, technology, and teachers coming in for curriculum planning assistance.

The traditional isn’t happening this year but Elizabeth is still trying to make a similar or better impact this year. The opportunities may not be as scheduled or as planned but moments that they become available are her opportunity to make her presence known.

So, the combination makes absolute sense here.


How to be an Anti-Racist in a Bookstore

This post from Matthew Morris might have been about me. It was his observation of an older white man in a bookstore. Matthew shared his thoughts about just what this man might be.

I checked so many of the boxes.

  • blue jeans. Absolutely. I don’t know that I actually have any others anymore except for some really dressy ones for fancy occasions. Except, my wife would never iron my blue jeans
  • plaid shirt. Maybe, although since the weather is cooler these days, it’s more likely a sweatshirt but definitely something comfortable
  • grey hair and glasses – check
  • cottage – no
  • mid-size sedan – does a Ford Fusion count? Check? I bought mine used
  • football – yes; golf – not for years – a real divergent here
  • green lawn – yes, but by dumb luck; I don’t water
  • retired – check

Matthew was surprised to see this man in the “community and culture” section. That could be me. For me, book stores are a place where I can go without an agenda. It’s just a nice place to spend time and just wander aimlessly throughout just looking at book titles and covers.

The part that I think that went missing was that Matthew didn’t stop and talk with the man as it sounds like he wanted to. I can’t help but think that that was an opportunity lost for both of them.

But that would be too judgmental. I put myself in Matthew’s shoes and I could understand standing back and doing nothing.


Unpacking the Invisible White Backpack in a Time of Black Lives Matter

Matthew’s post brought back a memory of this one from Deborah Weston. I’m wondering that if my comments about Matthew’s post don’t come from within my own personal Invisible White Backpack.

My knowledge of my family tree doesn’t go back very far, nowhere near what she describes in the post. I know where three of my grandparents came from – Denmark, Germany, and Great Britain and that’s about it. It never occurred to me in my younger days to dig deeper and maybe that’s because it didn’t matter. I was born in Ontario and I like to think I fit in nicely into my community.

As Deborah’s husband notes:

 He knows that White people have more privilege and “it has always been that way.”

I found it interesting to read Deborah sharing her heritage and her understanding about appearances and fitting into society. A great takeaway from her post though are the activities and resources about the topic that she shares.


Please do take some time and read the blog posts from these great Ontario Edubloggers. There’s so much there.

Then, make sure that you’re following them on Twitter.

  • Aviva Dunsiger – @avivaloca
  • Jennifer Casa-Todd – @jcasatodd
  • Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261
  • Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadio
  • Elizabeth Lyons – @mrslyonslibrary
  • Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorris
  • Deborah Weston – @DPAWestonPhD

This post appears on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Welcome to another Friday edition of This Week in Ontario Edublogs. #twioe It’s cool here but I’ve heard reports of you know what in other places. Stay warm and read some great blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers.


Living in the age of incivility Part 3 – The Iron Cage that is the school system

This is a rather longish post from Paul McGuire and even longer if you click through and read about “The Cage” and I would encourage that and thank Paul for including it.

As teachers, I think we’re all aware that a school district sets a direction and all teachers are expected to follow those directions. There are consequences for not playing along. I couldn’t help but think about this skit from Monty Python.

On one hand, people are encouraged to be creative but one the other hand, only when it’s within the rules.

As teachers, we always had the ability to contact our federation if we felt that we were treated improperly. Paul’s experience reminds us that principals are not part of any federation and are basically on their own.

In my mind, “The Cage” has become more of a thing with the amalgamation of school districts into super boards. More than ever, it’s easier to manage from the top if everyone follows the dictated rules.

The question should be asked – what type of school system results?


Back to Life, Back to Reality…

When a blog post starts with bad news and then good news and there’s still a great deal to read, it’s hard to predict!

Jen Aston lived with the message that she would be in a portable classroom for the school year. That really isn’t good news. There was a glimpse of sunshine when she was directed not to do too much setup. Because things change. In 2020? Really? <grin>

It sounds like she ended up in a better than expected classroom – a large room in the primary area of the school. That’s good news.

What’s in the rest of the post? It’s an interesting discussion about what’s happening in Mme Aston’s classroom in the various subject areas. If you know Jen, you just know that beekeeping would end up being part of the discussion.

Click through to see how!


Student Virtual Room Tutorial à la Bitmoji Classroom

Larissa Aradj shares with us an idea that she used from earlier this year. She had students design room; not with a drafting tool but in Google Slides.

She includes some pictures of what has been done by her students. They don’t need to maybe draw their own personal room but the room they’d like to have? It’s interesting to explore these images. As you might imagine, if you take a quick look, you might miss a great deal. Take some time, blow up the pictures, and see all the messages that are there.

Since it’s done in Google Slides, it seems to me that there are some interesting additional things that could be done. Make some areas hot spots so that you could open the books on bookshelves or any of the other objects in the room.

I’m also thinking that if this just one big collaborative slidedeck, the teacher could be hiding that Elf on the Shelf within student’s rooms and have them looking for it regularly.


Deciding whether or not to make the switch…

This really is a sign of the times in the fall of 2020. Some students have elected to start the year face to face and others have decided to do it online.

Depending upon the first decision and how it’s going, it should come as no surprise that students may wish to change their mode of learning. No surprises there and the rise in number of COVID people in the province might be forcing a new reality.

To manage this, school districts have set a date by which families must declare how it is that their children will go to school. That date determines the last date that they can switch, at least for now.

Kelly McLaughlin lays out the reality in her district where the date is November 3. To help parents, she’s created a pro and con information resource for them.

Of course, I know just what everyone is thinking – another reorganization of the schools and classrooms.


7 Reasons Why I’ll Miss My 7s

I fell for Diana Maliszewski’s teaser for this post

So I cried at school on Monday and I cried again at school on Friday. Different reasons; apologies to my in-person colleagues who were worried/alarmed at 1st. (Consider this a “teaser trailer” for this Monday’s blog post.)

— Diana Maliszewski (@MzMollyTL) October 10, 2020

and I held a spot for it.

You can feel her emotions come through in the post and I wish that I could be there to give her a hug. Split grades are a reality more than ever but imagine a school that looks like this…

JK-SK, 1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 6-7 and 7-8

The staff got together and reorganized as

JK-SK, 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-8

In this reorganization, Diana ended up having to pass off what sounds like a great group of Grade 7 students.

Now, keep in mind that in the TDSB, things have been in a flux so she hasn’t had a stable classroom since the first day of school. And yet, she is able to identify a bunch of attributes for these students and how they wished her goodbye. Hence the tears.

You just have to read the post.


Slice of Life: ***

I gained even more respect for Lisa Corbett after reading this blog post. Truly.

It brought back advice from my father – you can do the wrong thing and you can do the right thing. The wrong thing might make you friends or help you through a situation but doing the right thing will let you sleep at night.

The bottom line is that you have to live with yourself when things are done and you should never have to apologize for doing the right thing.

Do the wrong thing and you might be doing some explaining for a long time to come.


Bicycles for the Mind

It was great to see Helen DeWaard back blogging again.

This time around, she reflects as a result of watching the Social Dilemma.

This film, ironically warehoused within the Netflix collection, is touted as a “must watch” docudrama bringing a critical view to the impact of social media on the cultural fabric of society

She makes the connection for analyzing the moving using resources from the Association for Media Literacy and shares her questions with us.

A discussion of this also appeared on #OnEdMentors. Read the post for her analysis of things and check out the podcast on voicEd Radio for the group discussion.


Please take the time to read these posts in their entirety.

Then, follow these educators on Twitter.

  • Paul McGuire – @mcguirp
  • Jen Aston – @mme_aston
  • Larissa Aradj – @MrsGeekChic
  • Diana Maliszewski  – @MzMollyTL
  • Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261
  • Helen DeWaard – @hj_dewaard

This post originates from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Greetings from an area still in Phase 1. I hope those of you who are not got yourself a nice haircut.


The Class of 2020

Congratulations to Jennifer Casa-Todd for getting her Masters degree in Curriculum and Technology. In any other year, the day that she booked off would have been spent travelling to convocation, getting taken to a nice supper and getting showered with congratulatory gifts.

Of course, things are different and she made the effort to still make the day special by dressing up in cap and gown and walking across her front lawn.

So many questions – flipflops or barefeet? who just has a cap and gown hanging in a closet for this occasion?

Jennifer uses the post to extend congratulations to so many that are in the Class of 2020 no matter where they are. Achievements like this are big and definitely need to be observed.

Anne Adamson shared how they’re celebrating around here.


Skipped a generation

From the ourdadshoes blog comes this post from Jay Dubois. Like many of the posts of the blog, it’s written to honour the man that served as his father.

Jay is a bit tough on himself indicating that there were some things that his father tried to teach him that didn’t take. I think all of us often felt this way, that we couldn’t stand up to the standard that the greatest man in our lives set.

Jay’s in the position now of being father to his own children and shares his insights on how that’s going with him.

I just hope he doesn’t get this thrown at him like I do. “Daaaaad, you’re such a teacher.”


Snapshot- a Photo Synthesis

When Noa Daniels blogs about anything that fits into her BOB philosophy, I find it very insightful and most definitely worth the time to read, consider, and bookmark.

In this case, she talks about a concept that she uses called “Snapshots” which is such a rich activity at so many levels. Of course, there’s the photo aspect but it goes way beyond that when you consider media literacy.

What made such an impression on me was how flexible this activity was. It was started long before the school building closures but it seems to me that it’s relatively easily done at the distance teachers find themselves from students these days.

I think this is something bookmark-worthy for implementation in your own classroom whatever shape or form they take in the fall.

If you go right to the bottom of the post, Noa has included a slideshow of the images that the students have submitted for this assignment. You’ll have faith that Noa’s students are going to be world aware and empathic going forward.


STATEMENT FROM EDUGALS ABOUT EVENTS UNFOLDING IN THE USA.

Rachel Johnson, Katie Attwell are the EduGals. They take a departure from the regular focus of their blog – technology support, insights, and inspirations – to share their very personal opinions about what we’re seeing south of the border.

They recognize straight up their privilege as white women and some of the things that they’ve never had to worry about in their lives.

I felt that they identified and explained their position nicely. But Canada is not off the hook here and they don’t let the issues of the day that are in the news go unnoticed. Kudos to them for that.

Included in the post as well are resources worth investigating.

I’m reminded of this article written for TVOntario about the last segregated school in Canada. When and where before you click.

The story of Ontario’s last segregated Black school

And, you don’t have to beyond the nightly news to realize the plight of our First Nations’ citizens.


Classrooms & Communities

This is an older post from Idil Abdulkadir, dating back to February. So why share it now?

Like Noa’s post above, this describes a wonderful classroom activity for MAP4C. And, it’s given the very technical name of “The Thing”.

In a world where mathematics is seen as something that needs to be dragged from students and something that is to be endured until the end, this is different. The enthusiasm for mathematics and engagement from Idil comes through clearly in the post.

So why now? Because in these days of not meeting face to face with students, it’s something that addressed important expectations and yet has a huge engagement factor. Using support for Twitter, Idil has assembled a delightful learning activity and it begins with a collection of data in a shared spreadsheet.

We all know the power of infographics and data analysis done correctly with the element to convince the reader to get immersed in the topic.

So, “The Thing” has evolved over time.


Over the past few weeks from when I found it, I’ve been trying to highlight the great father posts from ourdadshoes.com. Since Father’s Day is this Sunday, I’ve run out of time. Posts that I haven’t shared here…

Intent of the Blog

Please take the time to click through and read all these great blog posts.

Then, follow these Ontario Educators on Twitter.

  • Jennifer Casa-Todd – @jcasatodd
  • Jay Dubois – @Jay__Dubois
  • Noa Daniel – @noasbobs
  • Edugals – @EduGals
  • Idil Abdulkadir – @Idil_A_

This post originates from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


And, just like that, it’s June. It’s been the longest three months and yet March Break seems just like yesterday. We’re now hearing of schools that are opening so that things that got left behind in March can be picked up. I’m not sure that you could write this as a story. And yet, here we are.

Here we are again for another Friday and an opportunity for me to highlight some terrific blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers. I hope that you can come with me and enjoy their writing.


Who has the Courage to Evolve?

When I first read this post from Deana Gordon, I immediately thought of Peter Cameron’s post challenging the notion from the Minister of Education that the system has pivoted.

This post comes from the “Authentic” Side of the stillnesshub blog. Labelling the notion of what’s happened in Ontario this spring as authentic is absolutely appropriate.

Deana notes that it’s very easy to find the negative but the reality is that teachers are on the job and everyone wants to do the very best for their students.

So, they need the courage to see things differently, reorder life and job priorities, express more gratitude and face the things that we run from. The courage to evolve indeed.


Exit Outcomes

I’ve been a participant of badging as a child through swimming lessons from the Red Cross and Royal Life Saving Society and then as a Wolf Cub and Boy Scout. The concept is to learn a skill, demonstrate a proficiency in it, and then demonstrate that proficiency to a tester that awards a badge for success.

We’ve seen badging or credentialing all over the place, typically for teachers. Microsoft, Google, and many software entities offer badges for teachers to put on their website or other social media as a way to give them cred with visitors.

Amy Bowker is looking at the concept for her classroom going forward. Whether schools are back in classroom or online learning continues, there undoubtedly will be more focus on digital portfolios to demonstrate skills. She’s created herself a set of credentials for expectations with varying levels of proficiency.

In education, we often think that the motivation to do well is a mark at the end of a course or year. Why not recognize smaller achievements ongoing throughout the year?

One takeaway from all this Learning at Home stuff has been the challenge of maintaining motivation. Perhaps ongoing badge collection would be helpful.

I think she’s on to something here.


Slice of Life: Flat

The question went out to students in Lisa Corbett’s online classroom. Has anyone got any mail?

<crickets>

But that was about to change as students from her class opened letters to reveal “Flat Mrs. Corbett”.

Like that other Flat guy, the challenge of taking a picture with Flat Mrs. Corbett in various places was on.

Would the impact have been there if it had been emailed?

Of course not, there’s just something special about getting personally addressed mail.

Spring in Ontario didn’t go by unnoticed here. Sweatshirt and sandals!


Emergency Assessment: Are We Growing Success(fully)?

Patt Olivieri takes us on a deep dive thinking about assessment and growth in these emergency times. She was inspired by a Twitter message from Brandon Zoras that generated quite a bit of discussion. As Brandon notes, the document has the flexibility to be melded by professional educators and many are doing so at this time.

I can’t do justice to this post except to encourage you to read it at least a couple of times. It’s rich in content and ideas and a section encouraging you to focus on what matters. She addresses a number of things there but there was one that really leaped from her list for me.

‘P’ is for Pandemic not PD – learn one thing well from a place of curiosity and care, not panic.

This was an important message for me. My job was Professional Development among other things. In order to stay on top of things, I was always learning because I wanted to.

In these times, people are indeed learning new things just as a way to survive. You could easily panic and feel a need to learn outside the traditional route. But good learning comes from curiosity, not from threats.


YOU’LL EARN / LEARN SOMEDAY

I’ve really been interested in the posts from the ourdadshoes.com blog. It’s a space for people to talk about being a father and honouring your own father.

This post came from Chris Cluff.

There’s a terrific opportunity that Chris has when going to university. He had the opportunity to meet up with his father at Union Station and take the train with him back to Oshawa. I’m jealous; I didn’t have that opportunity.

Of course, on the train, there might be a discussion between father and son. Chris had the opportunity to ask his father why he chose the profession that he did. The answer might surprise you so you need to read the post in Chris’ words.


THE IN-BETWEEN AND THE OTHER SIDE

This is another post from the ourdadsshoes blog, this time from Rolland Chidiac. He concludes with this piece of wisdom.

Whether you have a dad, are a dad, or want to be a dad, do what you can to enjoy every minute of your experience because once it’s gone, you can’t ever have it back exactly the way it was. 

Rolland shares that his father passed away young leaving many things between the two of them hanging.

Rolland lets us know that it was painful for him to write the post, thinking of all the memories that he had, and then he does find the power to share some things with us.

I’m so happy for him that he’s able to see his father in his children. That will let the memories be good and live on.


Sketchnote book summary for When by Dan Pink

The concept of organizing thoughts has never been so important as it is these days. People have different ways of organizing; I tend to use bullet points in a document or a graphical tool. I do recognize that my resultant notes always tend to look like a timeline or a flowchart.

I’m envious of people like Laura Wheeler who have the ability to create Sketchnotes as their way to organize. I enjoy it when they share their creations; in this case, it’s the book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel Pink. I find it easy to understand the message that she has diagramed.

I just can’t do it myself. I’ve spent way too much time trying.

Maybe I should just come to the conclusion that it’s not just for me. I really do appreciate that Laura shared her work with us.


Please take some time to click through and read these inspirational blog posts. There’s some great thinking there for you to enjoy.

Then, make sure that you’re following these educators on Twitter.

  • Deana Gordon – @dgdocfree76
  • Amy Bowker – @amyebowker
  • Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261
  • Patt Olivieri – @pattolivieri
  • Chris Cluff – @chrisjcluff
  • Rolland Chidiac – @rchids
  • Laura Wheeler – @wheeler_laura

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