This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Check out these recent posts from Ontario Edubloggers.


Watch Birds and Savour Books

From Jessica Outram, two terrific suggestions for what to do when you’re at home and not going anywhere.

The entry point for both is low but the payback can be very high. Around here, we have two bird feeders hanging just off the patio and, as the temperatures get colder, it gets very popular. Neither of the neighbours have a feeder so we’re the only place around here to eat. So, it’s not uncommon to see the whole gang as the weather gets colder.

It makes Christmas gifts easy to give. A book on identifying birds, bags of sunflower seeds to attract Blue Jays, …

If it ever gets boring (and it doesn’t), there are always quick trips to Point Pelee or Jack Miner.

I enjoyed Jessica’s story telling of how things play out for her with birds. At times, it seems like you’re looking down at a vibrant community. Are people watching us in this way? Do any of the birds that dine here make it to her place? Like most of her posts, she tells an interesting story and you’ll want to read it all.

Then, there are the books….


OneWordx12: Are you in?

A New Year. A New Word.

There are actually a couple of interesting and relevant blog posts from Beth Lyons to check out this week.

The first one proves that she saw something coming in 2020 by doing the whole #oneword thing a month at a time instead of choosing one word for the entire year. I found it really interesting to go through her list of 12 words and try to map out (or guess) what was happening in her personal and professional life.

Then, she starts off 2021 with her word for January. I thought that this was an interesting choice. Yes, it’s one word but she uses it in a number of different contexts just to illustrate how complicated things are these days. I’m not going to mention it here because I think you owe it to yourself to visit her blog to see her writing.

I am going to use one of her thoughts as inspiration for a future blog post. Maybe tomorrow.


Ask

Wow! That’s all that I could say when I was done reading this post from Amanda Potts. What an opportunity for her and for her students!

So, she’s bought into Beth Lyons’ concept of a word for a month and “Ask” is January’s word. After reading the post, I’m guessing that it wasn’t in place on December 31 but it’s certainly advice with a real example of success for all.

I know that people are looking for mega-inspiration activities for students to keep them engaged in online learning. So, out of boredom? or inspiration? Amanda wrote to a number of authors of the books her students are reading in class.

In 20 minutes, she had an confirmation from one of the authors that they would drop in virtually to her class and interact with them. What an opportunity.

Amanda summed it nicely when she said that all she had to do was Ask. Awesome.

During the This Week in Ontario Edublogs show on Wednesday, I asked Stephen Hurley is he was willing to share his expertise in Podcasting to a class that was interesting in taking the leap. He was very enthusiastic about the prospects so if you’re considering it, why not ask? He’s on Twitter as @Stephen_Hurley.

No pressure, Amanda, but I’m looking forward to a blog post from you sharing with us how your online guest worked out.


SIMPLIFYING ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION WITH GOOGLE ASSIGNMENTS – E033

The EduGals are back!

They have an interesting approach to sharing this message. It comes as both a podcast and a blog post.

I had to do a screen capture here just to show you that apparently they’re everywhere you get your podcasts.

I was doing some other work and listening to them in the background and was actually quite interested in their marriage of Brightspace and Google Assignments.

I’ll be honest here; I can pick up quite a bit by listening but this is so rich in content that I needed the blog post to completely understand their message. I thought that they had done a nice job in their explanation complete with their own documented captures.

If you’re using this combination of services, there’s probably some wisdom here that will make your job easier.


Saltwater

I’d only recently followed Hema Khodai’s blog and was pleased when my RSS program indicated that there was something to check out.

Interestingly, the content didn’t come from her but from another educator, Tharmila Apputhurai. The post is only a couple of paragraphs long but I’ll admit that it was one that brought out so much emotion in me.

During 2020, I think I’ve heard so many different personal reflections about what COVID means. But, nothing like this.

I felt as if I had been ordered by my acca to stay in the bunker until the sound and sight of the violence was gone.

I did have to look up “acca” since it was a new term to me and that even further personalized the message for me.

I hope that the message of healing in 2021 rings true.


What’s Your Superpower? Mine Is Teaching!

If there’s a testament to why I follow people on Twitter, this is it. I’ve followed Nilmini Ratwatte-Henstridge for a while now and, quite frankly, she’s been a person that pops up on my FollowFriday list regularly.

Recently, she shared that she had a blog post for us to check out. And I did.

I can’t imagine that, after 2020, there isn’t a teacher who hasn’t felt being pushed further in their profession than at any other time. Nilmini is that boat and shares a list of 10 things and reflections about her feelings.

  • Strike a Balance
  • Discover Your Network
  • Ah, this thing called Technology
  • Be Yourself

You’ll have to click through to discover all 10! I’m betting that you’ll find out all kinds of things about her and probably yourself in these days.

I don’t know if I could agree with “Discover Your Network” more than I do as I write this. I’ve had my network for years now and daily I’m inspired and uplifted by the connections that I’ve made.

Since Ontario Educators are connected anyway these days, why not created your own Personal Learning Network for ideas, inspiration, and people to plan with?


A #VisibleLearning Look At My Playing Reality: Finding Joy In Remote Kindergarten

I’ve always said that they don’t pay kindergarten teachers enough. I’ve often felt exhausted just walking by their classrooms.

In this post, Aviva Dunsiger pulls back the curtain and gives us an inside look at her classroom, activities, and all that it takes to pull it off. It’s a long post but worth putting time aside to read.

There are interesting personal thoughts about what she thinks she’s doing. I always found it interesting to compare what I thought I did with my principal or superintendent in the debriefing after being supervised. My thought always was that I was overly hard on myself. How about Aviva?

So, she lays it all out there in this long post full of thoughts and documentation and she’s looking for advice. Do you have any?


It’s been another great experience to read these posts and then share my thoughts with you. There’s such a wide range of topics. I hope that you can find the time to click through and read the originals.

Then, follow these people on Twitter.

  • Jessica Outram – @jessicaoutram
  • Beth Lyons – @mrslyonslibrary
  • Amanda Potts – @ahpotts
  • EduGals – @edugals
  • Hema Khodai – @HKhodai
  • Nilmini Ratwatte-Henstridge – @NRatwatte
  • Aviva Dunsiger – @avivaloca

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


I know that there’s a big sigh of relief across the land for today. Congratulations for all the effort that it has taken to get this far and I wish all readers the best for the holiday. As usual, here’s a great collection of recent writing from Ontario Edubloggers.


The Journey Continues

I’ve followed Beth Lyons all year with her one word that she’s taken month by month as opposed to the year long choice others have made.

She wrestled with a word for December

  • teacher
  • decenter

And gives really good reasons for not selecting them.

Sadly, she questions her effectiveness as a teacher-librarian in these days as things are completely different. Things have changed a bit and she’s being called into action a little more so feels good about that. But, my dear Beth, everyone is feeling challenged and frustrated at every turn. I think we all know that you’re giving the same 125% that all educators are and that should never minimize your feelings about your impact. It’s different for everyone.

Anyway, click through to read the word that she finally chose for the last month of the year.


Writing in front of them

Man, I loved this post from Amanda Potts. I’d like to meet this Torin who missed out!

Beyond that, though, we’ve all had embarrassing moments that have us turning red in front of students. Amanda’s story is done in the best of educational pedagogy and yet had an interesting turn.

She could have turtled but decided that she’d gone too far to turn back and became very frank in front of her students.

The result? She claims that her students turned in some of their most honest writing work. You’ve got to like that.

And, you can’t help but think that the same results would never have happened if her lesson had been the sort of contrived activity that didn’t result in embarrassment!


LearningInTheLoo: Scan to Email

This will bring a smile to your face.

Given a loophole in the use of washrooms at her school, Laura Wheeler was back at providing professional learning activities while taking care of things when nature calls. I’m making a leap here assuming that people don’t go to the washroom just for the PD.

The activity is something that every educator should know.

A networked photocopier can do more than print copies to paper.

In this case, Laura shows staff how they can scan to email and then take care of content electronically. Not only is it an efficient way of handling things, think of the paper that can be saved.

And, managing files can be easier than binderizing sheets of paper.


Earth Day: Call for Submissions 2021

As a result of this post from Jessica Outram, I’ve added a new word to my vocabulary.

eChapbook

It’s an initiative that she started last year and it marries the concept of poetry and Earth Day. This year’s theme is “Learning from the Earth”.

Click through to read about the initiative, how to participate, and the rules with timelines.

I can’t help but think that there might be huge interest in this so help a colleague out, read the post, and share it with others.


Overjoyed – A Christmas Tale with an Ed-Tech Twist

Like Amanda’s post above, there are things that prove that teachers and students are human after all.

Terry’s post brought back some memories of my own as a student and as a teacher when it comes to Christmas assemblies.

The memory in this case – overhead projectors and Christmas song lyrics. Somehow, the classic “Joy to the World” by Three Dog Night enters the picture!


Treadmills Near Me

It’s a gazillion dollar industry so you might find it bizarre that there is a person that doesn’t like a treadmill. Other than me, there’s Matthew Morris.

I’ll be honest; we had one in our bedroom and it became a place to hang clothes. It was purchased with the best of intentions for getting fit. Or, at least getting moving.

Quite frankly, it’s boring and my bad knee just became worse from using it. We ended up giving it to my daughter along with our best wishes. I should ask her how it’s going.

If you ever wondered if someone could paint a story about a treadmill, you’ll be interested to read this post from Matthew.

I wonder what he feels about dog walking. It’s an exercise that you can’t put off. At least three times a day.


In the Midst of Life . . .

Slow death and muffled grief

Joan Vinall-Cox shares some writing and an image that really hit me emotionally.

It hit at close to the same time as the news of the issues at Schlegel Villages.

Joan, this is a powerful piece and I know that you didn’t write it with me in mind but you hit me right between the eyes.


Please take some time to click through and read these wonderful blog posts.

Then, make sure that you follow these folks (and their blogs) on Twitter.

  • Beth Lyons – @mrslyonslibrary
  • Amanda Potts – @Ahpotts
  • Laura Wheeler – @wheeler_laura
  • Jessica Outram – @jessicaoutram
  • Terry Greene – @greeneterry
  • Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorris
  • Joan Vinall-Cox – @JoanVinallCox

This post is from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


The voicEd Radio show is always fun to do and it keeps me out of trouble for an hour on Wednesday morning. It’s even more special with guest hosts. This week Paul McGuire joined Stephen Hurley and me for the show. If you missed it, all the shows are archived here – https://voiced.ca/project/this-week-in-ontario-edublogs/


Looking Catholic Education in the Face in Ontario

I remember that one of the arguments against full funding was that it would promote one state sponsored religion and their values and teachings against all others.

In this post, Paul McGuire takes on the issues surrounding a comment from a school board trustee and the breaking of the district’s code of conduct. Paul takes a look at the issue and the influences in and out of education.

Most importantly, he applauds the efforts of teacher Paolo De Buono for speaking his mind and keeping the issue up front in the eyes of those who follow him on social media.

The ultimate decision about this one individual trustee will happen at the next set of elections and it will be interesting to follow.


Brutalist worksheets

Writing on the ETFO Heart and Art Blog, Will Gourley shares his thoughts about the use of worksheets in the classroom. Along the way, he uses the term “brutalist” to further his thoughts.

In this day and age with a mixture of modes of education, I can see where a worksheet solves a number of issues and could be seen as an attempt to level the play ground. I know that many schools have now implemented a quota system on the school photocopier, sadly for financial rather than pedagogical reasons!

It’s sad to see so many “21st Century Educators” turning to Google Docs as a replacement for the paper worksheet. Going digital should always add value to the process and is not just an opportunity to replicate bad practice in a digital form.

In the post, Will shares a number of resources that could be used instead and they are digital. Paul recommended Discovery Education resources during the show. While we were live, Will sent me a message indicating that he had omitted TVO in his collection and that he would add it in. A quick check indicates that he was true to his word.


SOCIAL PRESENCE IN ONLINE LEARNING

Writing on the TESL Ontario blog was a new blogger to me – Jennifer Allore and I hope that I’ve managed to track down her social media account for later on in the post.

We know that teaching online or hybrid is a real challenge and people are doing their best to use the tools that are available to them. Sadly, many districts are just saying “here’s a link – good luck” without any professional learning to go along with it.

There are many tools and Jennifer shares some great advice with the following:

  • Video
  • Personal 
  • Discussion Board
  • Feedback

The one area that it seems to me that would be a challenge in the ESL classroom is the conversations that are a part of the normal routine. Can a Zoom session lead to the same results?


What Is Our Responsibility?

For those who aren’t in an Early Years’ classroom, I suspect that it can be a challenge to read content into the sort of play that might be seen on a cursory glance. Fortunately, we have Aviva Dunsiger digging deeply about the concept.

A student wanted a repeat of a Box City project. I’m impressed that this second year kindergarten remembered the fun from a year ago!

Along the way, Aviva shares that they got into a number of pretty important topics.

  • Gender,
  • Racism,
  • Bullying,
  • #BlackLivesMatter

Those are important topics at every grade. Why not here.

I’m be remiss if I didn’t mention the number of pictures that Aviva shares and the way that she does. It’s well done – show the activity and not the faces…


Designing school when students have the Teacher’s Copy

Boy, did I enjoy this post from Dave Cormier. We know that we all live in different times.

When I read the title of Dave’s post, I thought immediately about university life. Some professors had put previous exams in the library so that we could check out what their exams look like. Others refused to do so indicating that they’d have to come up with a new exam if they did that!

Dave addresses the current reality and information scarcity versus information abundance. If you don’t understand information abundance, it’s time for a Google workshop.

So, what is the goal of university? Is it just to go and learn stuff well enough to be able to play it back? Or, is it a place to learn and apply stuff? If it’s the former, then everyone should be able to thrive by staying home. Of course, surveillance tools will be required to ensure that you’re not cheating on exams.

If it’s the latter, it’s a game changer for many – students, universities, professors – and that leads to a great deal of questions which Dave closes his post with.


Math Links for Week Ending Dec 4th, 2020

David Petro is always good for some interesting things to do with mathematics and this collection does disappoint.

I spent a great deal of time poking around with

Desmos colours

I’m intrigued by this upcoming webinar about snowflakes and symmetry.


Getting High

No, Peter Cameron is not talking about the opening of a cannabis story.

He’s after:

  • Moving.
  • Outside.
  • Breathing.
  • Being in the moment.

He and his family are finding it very close to his home. It’s their current “high” and it sounds like they’re really taking advantage of it.

In these COVID days, I’m reading more and more about classes taking advantage of getting outside for periods of time. This post reminds me that there is a huge advantage just being mindful while doing it.


There’s your collection of great posts from Ontario Edubloggers. Take a few moments and click through to enjoy each of these terrific posts.

Then, follow these bloggers (and their blogs) on Twitter:

  • Paul McGuire – @mcguirp
  • Will Gourley – @WillGourley
  • Jennifer Allore – @jen_allore
  • Aviva Dunsiger – @avivaloca
  • Dave Cormier – @davecormier
  • David Petro – @davidpetro314
  • Peter Cameron – @petectweets

This post originated at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


I’m not a real fan of using salt. Typically, it’s not needed in Essex County. It could be icy and snowy in the morning but mostly it’s gone by noon (with exceptions of course). This week, we had a pretty good storm by our standards and the patio is actually quite icy. I had shovelled the snow but then it started to melt and back fill. With the winter sun, it doesn’t get much light so I’m thinking I have no alternative. For the rest of you who got much more than us, I know, I know. It’s not a biggy.

Time to share some great blogging from a collection of Ontario Edubloggers. That’s more fun than spreading salt anyway.


Reflecting and Celebrating

I recognize that it’s a challenging time to be in education. Certainly, you don’t have to look very hard to read about the very real challenges.

That’s not the case with Lisa Munro.

We would not expect a family member who just received their beginner’s license to navigate a road trip across Canada in their first week behind the wheel, nor should we expect perfection in the structures and processes we have created with school start up. 

Amen.

I love a post that is just full of hope and understanding.

Lisa is looking to connect to continue the discussion. Why not enrich your learning network and do so?


Our path to personal wellbeing in 2020: Insights & offerings

I loved this post from Laura Elliott even though I didn’t completely understand it the first time through. A few subsequent reads and I find something new to hang my hat on each time.

She tells a personal story of self-care and the challenges that she has and uses the word yo-yo to describe her journey that ended up in yoga and pilates.

So, if she’s having difficulties, imagine the teenager whose trying to cope these days. It seems to me that it may largely go unnoticed since there is this sense of bravado that goes with growth and development at that age.

Laura then turns her eye towards the media and how its portrayed women over the years and then to social justice. As Stephen Hurley noted in our live radio broadcast on Wednesday when we took on Laura’s description of a “Food desert” in Toronto, it’s always been more affordable to buy less than healthy food. Laura notes that it’s our privilege that allows us to spend more for healthy.

This is a rich post describing part of what’s happening that might well be overlooked. Read it a couple of times; it’s not an easy read but is so full of ideas.


Negativity.

As noted above, it’s not hard to find stories about negativity and so I kind of expected that tone in this post from James Skidmore. It was his reflection on a story reported by the CBC that

“Pandemic has caused decline in educational quality”

This was pulled from an article from a story conducted by the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations and is focused on post-secondary.

James notes that much of the content from the study was overlooked in favour of reporting on the negative statement above. He draws a couple of conclusions at the end that I think are important.

Then there was this … which I hadn’t thought of. In an effort to maintain student interest when working online, educators have switched to little tasks as opposed to big ones with the idea that they would provide better engagement. On the surface, it might appear to make sense but when you think of the high performers in your class, there really are no little tasks. If there’s a mark or assessment, it’s important so the whole notion may have the opposite effect.

It may work well in a face to face classroom but doing it online is a different ballgame.


Different Number Fonts

It was easy to skim this post from Deanna McLennan. After all, it’s two short paragraphs, two pictures, and a link.

But it stuck with me for some reason.

She gave her students a pair of dice, a bingo dabber and then a sheet of numbers in different fonts. The instruction – make a game.

Of course the mathematician in me could think of a number of ways this could turn into a game but then I was disappointed in my thinking. All of my ideas had been done previously so I was just working with my previous learning.

And, am I missing or overlooking the point with the use of different fonts? Then, I started to think with the dabber and the different fonts, the product started to look like those annoying Captchas that drive me crazy. That then, opened my mind to newer things. So, I appreciated the push to my thinking, Deanna. I hope that she follows up with some of the things that these inquisitive minds generated.

Oh, and there’s a link to a document that she created that you could download and use it with your class.


You’re making me hungry!

Who hasn’t found the concept of student blogging intriguing? In theory, it should be easy to do. Just get the kids to write about something that interests them. How many times have you seen that logic fall flat on its face. There are so many dead blogs out there that started out with the best intentions.

I’ve long been a fan of what Cameron Steltman does with blogging. He writes the blog post and then his students go to the blog and respond to his prompt. It has been a while and I had wondered if he had given up on the concept. I was pleased to see that he’s back.

Now here’s the challenge, can you write a descriptive paragraph that doesn’t mention what your food is but describes it so well that your classmates can guess what it is?

As I write this, there have been 18 responses. I can’t remember the last time I got 18 responses to a blog post! Have I ever?

Here’s the most recent.

Did you get it?

More importantly, check the time and date stamp on this reply. When was the last time that you had students writing at 5:30 in the morning?


Psychology, Cybersecurity and Collaboration in Educational Technology

I file part of the content of this post from Tim King under “things I hope never happen to me”.

Followers of Tim know that he and his students have been doing some pretty heavy lifting with cybersecurity. While some classes are dragging and dropping blocks to draw geometric figures, this goes way deeper.

Don’t get me wrong; there’s room for both and both should be done.

It’s so easy to sit back and say “this will never happen to me” and I hope that it never does. But, when it does, what do you do? Who do you turn to? It may well be one of Tim’s graduates who have been interested and immersed in the concept of security.

The post describes the activities that students work through and has them using virtual machines. What an experience for them!

Think this will never happen in “real life”, whatever that is these days? It happens more than you would think and my stomach just sinks when I see some of the cases that make the news – typically not because the bad guys were caught but because someone paid the ransom to get their data back.


The torch has passed…

There comes a certain age when things are passed along from family members to others. It may not have happened to you yet but there will come a time.

It’s most noticeable and most emotional when it happens at “big event times” like birthdays or anniversaries.

In Anna Bartosik’s case, it appears to be happening this Christmas season. She’s on the receiving end of the torch.

“We have to make pierogi this year. I’ll do the fillings and we’ll make them together on the weekend. We can get them finished in one morning. We can make enough to share and take some to your aunts and your grandmother.”

I’ll be damned if I let COVID steal the Christmas pierogi.

There are a lot of Polish things in here that I don’t really understand but I do have memories of my parents owning one of those crocks. We used it for making pickles but not in this case!

It’s a lovely story of family and generations.


Please take the time to click through and enjoy all of these wonderful posts.

Then, make sure that you’re following these bloggers on Twitter.

  • Lisa Munro – @LisaMunro11
  • Laura Elliott – @lauraelliottPhD
  • James M Skidmore – @JamesMSkidmore
  • Deanna McLennan – @McLennan1977
  • Cameron Steltman – @MrSteltman
  • Tim King – @tk1ng
  • Anna Bartosik – @ambartosik

This post originates on the blog:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you found it anywhere else without attribution, it’s not the original and that makes me sad.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Welcome to another Friday and a chance to take a look at some great blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers. As always, you won’t be disappointed with this great content.


#girlswhogame – Part 2

From Roland Chidiac, this is a followup to his Part 1 blog post from a few weeks ago. Read the blog post and you’ll see where Roland and the #girlswhogame are heading now in their learning.

Spoiler – Minecraft

Unlike games of old that are often first person shooter types, the gaming in this classroom includes work with:

  • solve problems using an inquiry process
  • think of and express questions in order to generate novel ideas
  • think about their thinking and have a growth mindset
  • participate in team work
  • communicate effectively in a variety of ways
  • understand how they are globally interconnected

Of course, all of these concepts are fleshed out in the post and it comes complete with pictures so that you can get a sense of what it looks like in Mr. Chidiac’s classroom.


Friday Two Cents: Society Cannot Function Without Women

Paul Gauchi shares with us some observations from his recent tour of occasional teaching. He’s noting that many of the teachers he’s working with are female.

In a discussion, as I’m sure happens in all schools, the reclosing of the school buildings is a topic.

Paul offers two reasons why he thinks it won’t happen.

First, he shares his thoughts that the politicians view schools as daycare. Secondly, he wonders about teaching positions being undervalued and expands the list to include a number of positions that are traditionally held by women.

He then takes a turn and offers a solution that might help the cause. As a father of two daughters, I didn’t find it a particularly easy post to read.


No Longer School Online

Regular readers will know that I really appreciate a good reflective post and Terry Whitmell looks at the first part of the school year and the successes that her school had with online instruction.

  • Teacher Networking
  • Student Agency
  • Consistency
  • Tools
  • Efficiency
  • Organization
  • Professional Learning
  • Student-Student Connection
  • Success

In the voicEd Radio show, I took a bit of liberty with Terry’s post and used the work Efficacy instead of Efficiency. I really liked her observations about how students took control of their educational lives. In a normal school setting, the structure is imposed on students but she observed their taking control of things. That seems to me to be one of the most important things from this post.

The post is written from the perspective of an administrator. I’d love to know if the teachers at the school observed the same things.


Step Down #SOL2020

Melanie White had me a bit emotional as I read this post. It was difficult to read because she uses “step down” as a delimiter throughout the post. It really was effective as it made me slow down and really mull over her thoughts.

Her thoughts took me through a sense of loneliness as she walks through her school describing what she sees. It reminded me of my own secondary school where we had an old part and a new part. The new part probably could have been a school anywhere in the province but the old part was really unique and yet, at the same time, similar to the building that Melanie describes.

I know that I’ve mentioned it before but her writing can be so moving and she’s done it again.

Then, the bottom fell out when she describes an airless room with Grade 9 students and her efforts to change that. While only a few people could have written something this emotional, I would bet that the emotions and the imagery she uses could be the words of so many others.


Social Distance Games & Activities

The day before I read this post from Larissa Aradj, I’d driven by French Catholic elementary school and students were outside.

Normally, that’s nothing to take note of but the ground was wet and it was the activity that the students were doing that caught my attention. They were lined up, physically distanced of course, and they were doing pushups as the teacher walked along in front of them. I was witnessing a Physical Education activity.

That took me back to my football coaching days!

This year, Larissa has picked up classes of Physical Education herself. It seems to me that that really is a challenging assignment these days. In the good old days, you’d have soccer balls and other tools of the game trade. These are not allowed these days so innovative ways to keep students engaged must be found. In this post, Larissa shares some ideas and links to professionally created activities. It’s a good collection to pass along to colleagues. Thanks, Larissa.

Hey, how about burpees?


Changing the narrative

I found this an interesting discussion from Alanna King. And she’s right; every curriculum document and course of study is presented chronologically.

My “yah, but” came from Computer Science where you build capacity in that matter; it you jump ahead, you overlook key concepts. I mean, what Computer Science teacher hasn’t had to stop in the middle of a lesson to explain something that was not apparent to be missing when you started.

Alanna’s talking more about the big picture in the humanities and that got her thinking about educational structure.

Good questions.

(Alanna, I felt badly that I started at the top of your list and read down)


Creating Engaging Lessons with EdPuzzle – E029

From the Edugals blog, a link to their podcast and the notes to go along with it. The topic this time around was EdPuzzle.

Reading this made me feel old!

EdPuzzle is a tool and a technique for helping students understand the content of a video and you’re probably thinking YouTube. I read an article recently that children put more credibility behind something from YouTube rather than something teacher created. When you think about it, it makes sense.

I actually was “formally” taught about how to use video in the classroom and the lesson went far beyond the play button. It involved noting the timer, having a sheet of questions, and most importantly a remote control. So teacher centred!

In the post, the ladies take you through the process as a teacher and a students and offer some sample codes so that you can experience what they’ve been working with.


There’s lots of great content yet again this week that will inspire you and help you take your game to the next level. Please take the time to click through and read all of these wonderful posts.

Then, make sure you’re following these bloggers on Twitter.

  • Rolland Chidiac – @rchids
  • Paul Gauchi – @PCMalteseFalcon
  • Terry Whitmell – @TerryWhitmell
  • Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadio
  • Larissa Aradj – @MrsGeekChic
  • Alanna King – @banana29
  • EduGals – @EduGals

This post comes from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.