This Week in Ontario Edublogs


First off …

Today marks a day of rotating strike action by ETFO members in the following districts:

  • Bluewater District School Board
  • District School Board Ontario North East

Details here.

Despite the situation in the province with respect to collective bargaining, Ontario Educators continue their professional reflection on their own blogs.


And the journey expands…

Congratulations to Beth Lyons

As I have received news that I was successful in my bid to become the Vice President/ President Elect of the OSLA Council for 2020-2021 years, I think this is a great time to reflect on my journey thus far…

To celebrate, Beth takes the opportunity to reflect on her own professional growth as a teacher-librarian. What impresses me about this look back is just how diverse a background is required for a teacher-librarian in order to carry out the role in the year 2020.

I think that many of us read quite a bit but we’re guided by our own interests and pressures. Beth reinforces the notion that a teacher-librarian must read and understand for everyone in their charge. Follow any teacher-librarian and you’ll notice the same thing.

But learning doesn’t stop there for a contemporary leader. This post touches many bases – podcasting, presenting, action research, and more.


Students’ Research Going Beyond Their Own Classroom With Minecraft EE

On the Fair Chance Learning blog, Ryan Magill shares some work dealing with Minecraft and his students. For those who are concerned that it could be a big free for all, you need to read and understand all of the content of this post.

The focus here was driven by a unit of study dealing with animals and habitats and brought in the notion of zoos and aquariums. What an opportunity – design your own zoo!

I had to smile. This country boy knew all kinds of things about cows at an early age! But, it’s not safe to assume that everyone had that chance. Maybe they do have to do some research and build an exhibit for their zoo!

I think that the big takeaway for all is that you need to avoid boxing yourself into a corner with technology. With a playground like Minecraft, the sky really is the limit.


frozen solid; warmth in the lines

This post, from Heather Swail, could best be described as “prelude to a strike”. It was written just before a work action and is very philosophical about education and the role of the teacher.

In education, the essence of pedagogy, teachers are taught and encouraged to be flexible, to change plans mid-stream when the lesson is just not working, to moderate voice, stance, position when dealing with a nervous or reluctant child, to try to understand behaviour, resistance, background and underlying issues. A good teacher is fluid all of the time. 

Heather launches into a story that reflects the reality for many teachers. I have no doubt that just about any teacher could write and reflect on the same topics; what makes this so powerful comes from the eloquence and passion from Heather.

She closes by indicating that this will likely be the last year of a career for her. It truly is sad that she’s going through this; I think everyone would like to think they’re going to finish a career with the best year ever.


Are we willing to lose a bit of control?

I love this post from Paul McGuire. He was inspired to write as a result of a Dean Shareski blog post “I Don’t Think I’m an EdTech Guy Anymore.” I had read Dean’s post and grew angrier as I read it. I just hope that he had his tongue in cheek as he wrote it.

Substitute any subject area for “EdTech” and you’ll see the folly.

This, coming from someone whose title was, “Computers in the Classroom Teacher Consultant”. The role was framed for me by my first superintendent. I still remember his thoughts.

“I don’t want you to just learn more technical stuff. I can hire someone for half your salary with a better technical background. I need you to help people learn how to teach with technology.”

He was right, of course.

Learning new technical things was, and remains, my little side gig. And, I’ll be honest; I love it. But we’re in the teaching profession and teaching should be at the heart of everything we do.

I probably became more of a nuisance to my Teacher Consultant colleagues as I was expected to learn about good teaching and good learning throughout all curriculum areas and all grades.

Paul’s post illustrates what happens when technology is still viewed as something extra, something special, something so that you can say “I used technology today” …

Earlier this week I observed a student teacher going through a lesson with some grade 9 students. The lesson did have technology – there were Youtube videos and digital media involved in the presentation. What was missing was any level of engagement with the students. The information was conveyed using a very traditional lecture style, the students were the passive receptors of the information.

I still remember the advice from my superintendent which made so much sense to me and still drives my thinking unlike unproven schemes like SAMR.

With technology, you can…

  1. do things differently
  2. do different things

The first step, I would suggest, is where this student teacher is. And, you can’t blame that student since he/she has been in the education system for 16 or 17 years. The challenge for her/him and indeed for the teachers at the Faculty is to move to the second step. It’s not an easy step for some.


All These Certified Teachers

Everyone has a story about how they got into education and became teachers. In this post, Matthew Morris talks about his story. His was a route that I would not have been able to do.

He was good enough as a football player to get a university scholarship and he was thinking NFL. When that didn’t work out…

When I realized the professional athlete route was a wrap, I started to think about “careers”. Teaching was my back up plan. I settled on that path during my senior year of university

My personal first plan was to be independently wealthy and, when that didn’t work out, I went to university. Unlike Matthew, I didn’t have the luxury of staying with my parents but was able to rent a room with a friend for the 8 months at the Faculty. I don’t recall the cost of tuition at the time but I’m positive it wasn’t anywhere close to the six thousand that Matthew quotes.

He offers an interesting proposal for improving the profession and that is “lowering” teacher credentialing. I read it as the cost to become a teacher.

It’s not just the process of becoming a teacher that is expensive after Grade 12. The whole cost of university can be limiting to some. Are people limited in career paths like the story that Matthew shares?


A problem of zero

I love a good mathematics story and there’s a great one in this post from Melissa Dean.

Visit her post to see the graphic there. As she notes, it leads to some interesting discussions about

  • what’s a rational number?
  • what’s an irrational number?
  • Are there ‘fake’ numbers?
  • what are those weird symbols about?
  • Why isn’t zero a natural number?

I had to smile at the observation made as a result of the discussion.

Zero is not a number

How would you handle such an assertion?


4:45

I think Aviva Dunsiger and I are kindred souls. At least in terms of being active in the morning! As you know, my daily blog post appears at 5:00. It’s not that I’m writing at that time but I am connected and reading and it’s nice to get a notification that the post scheduled for that time has indeed gone live. If I ever mess up, Aviva is there to let me know. (and it’s happened more than once)

I can imagine that this would be a difficult post for her to write, first at an emotional level and secondly when you’re putting yourself out there via her popular blog.

As we know, ETFO members are currently involved with a work action and Aviva has had her schedule interrupted as a result. When you’re up at 4:45, it should come as no surprise that she’s into school working at setting things up for the upcoming day.

In the post, she describes a typical day and

I am always at school between 6:45 and 6:50

It’s interesting to picture her setting up for the day. As an Early Years’ teacher, I can only imagine how much preparation goes into making sure that all the areas are ready to go.

There are a couple of lessons here…

  • first of all, to the federations, there is a lesson about how their members are affected when rules are applied to everyone
  • secondly, to parents and the general public, quality learning doesn’t happen by accident. All teachers have their own planning and implementation of lessons each and every day. It doesn’t happen by magic

Aviva has lots of friends and supporters – when you visit the blog post, also make sure that you check out the replies to her post.


Please keep you colleagues who are on strike today in your mind.

And, also think of the professionalism of these bloggers. Follow them on Twitter.

  • @mrslyonslibrary
  • @mrmagill1
  • @hbswail
  • @mcguirp
  • @callmemrmorris
  • @Dean_of_math
  • @avivaloca

This post appeared first at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Happy Friday and welcome to another sharing of some of my reading from Ontario Edubloggers I did recently.


Clean those boards

From Cal Armstrong, perhaps a Public Service Announcement. As Cal notes in the post, he has a number of whiteboards around the perimeter of his classroom that he uses regularly. His problem? How to clean them.

He indicates that he’s tried:

  • torn up towels
  • athletic socks
  • plastic bags

That’s quite a collection of ideas!

I never had that many whiteboards but I recall a solution, by accident, that worked out well. I had a microfibre wipe for my glasses sitting on the desk and reached out and actually used it once. It did an amazing job. Of course, they don’t come free and I don’t know how long it would work before it would need to be washed. I just threw it in the wash when I got home. And, truth be told, I only had one whiteboard that I was using. I can’t imagine a whole classroom of them.

Any suggestions? Head over to Cal’s blog and help a colleague out.


THE REWARDS OF TEAM TEACHING

From the TESL Ontario blog, a post from Mandeep Somal that I think goes further beyond just the concept of Team Teaching.

I’ll admit; team teaching wasn’t something that I wasn’t able to experience as the only Computer Science teacher in my school. So, I ended up living vicariously through this post.

I think that it’s tough to argue when she outlines how it works…

  • Open communication between teachers – this can consist of daily updates about the class, sharing ideas of what and how to teach, or jointly assessing students’ progress.
  • Efficiency in work – since you know that someone else is depending on you to complete your share of the workload, you become accountable to stay on schedule and get your share done in a timely manner.
  • Greater attention to detail – nobody wants to work with a messy or unorganized teaching partner, thus making you attentive to detail.

My only wonder about this deadlines and holding up your end on things. We all know that things always don’t go as planned when timing it out. Does missing your target cause issues for your partner?

Actually, I have another wonder – read the post and enjoy the philosophy described here – why don’t more people do this?


How to Appreciate Straight Talk

I’ve never met Sue Dunlop; I know her through her writing but if I had to guess, I would have predicted that she was, in fact, a straight shooter.

From this post, it’s not a new thing – she claims to have been this way since she was 18. In the post, she offers a couple of titles to support the notion of proceeding with candor.

In my opinion, it’s most efficient to use straight talk. If you’re honest and truthful, you won’t get caught up in the same discussion at some later date when you have to remember just what it was that you had said if you make it overly flowery or you dance around the issue.

I always appreciated a supervisor who was a straight talker. It was worthwhile knowing her/his position and once you agree on the points, much easier to determine a plan of action.

In a leadership course that I took once, we were encouraged to adopt this type of approach and Sue captures it nicely in the post. The one caution is to make statements on things that are observable and measurable and stay away from things that could be taken as a personal slam to someone.


Friday Two Cents: Being Positive For The New Year

I learned, from this recent post from Paul Gauchi, that he isn’t a contract full-time teacher yet. I guess I considered from the richness of his past posts that he was.

He manages to tie that position into one of not making a resolution for the New Year. No one word here.

Instead, he shares his outlook of positiveness…

  • Have high hopes
  • See the good in bad situations
  • Trust your instincts

The last point is interesting. I wonder – are teacher instincts different from other people’s? Not only do you, as a teacher, act for yourself but you also act and make decisions for students in your charge.

I like this graphic…it says it all.


Words on Fire

I started out reading this post from Sue Bruyns and remember thinking that it was going to be a book report or summary. Of course, it’s from Sue, so I made sure that I read the entire post.

Then, it got real.

But beyond becoming immersed in a world as readers, we also want our students to know the power of creation. We want them to use words, play with words and combine words to create other worlds, to create characters and to create tantalizing images of places that others will want to visit.

That changed the tone just a bit for me. Yes, she was still on about the book but it leads you to realize that reading in education is more than enjoying or understanding a good book. It should move the reader to want to create content on her/his own.

It seems to me that blogging is a great place to start in order to support this.


Snippets #3

Peter Beens is back with a summary and commentary on some of his recent posts. A couple really caught my interest.

Trump Properties

We definitely live in a challenging world and the recent acts and responses should give worldly travellers pause to consider their destination. Maybe it’s because I’m Canadian and some of the passengers on that Ukrainian flight were from the University of Windsor, but I would think carefully about places that I would care to visit.

If You’re an Avro Arrow Fan…

I’m old enough to appreciate the amount of Canadiana that surrounded the Avro. Like Peter, I feel that it’s a part of our history and it’s a good thing that these blueprints weren’t destroyed so that we might all be able to enjoy them. Would history have changed if this project hadn’t been scrapped?


The Memory Thief

This is a story that we’re seeing more and more of and many of us have lived through. It’s not a pleasant thing. In fact, when we were younger, there was so little that we knew about it. We sure know a great deal more today.

In this post, Judy Redknine shares a story of love and caring between her and her mother. She writes in great detail the process that they both have endured and the struggle through dealing with dementia.

Very appropriately, she addresses this illness as a thief stealing parts of a wonderful life.

Stealing is all about vulnerability. My mother is vulnerable. We are all vulnerable. Today her priceless treasures remain locked in a strong box. Her joy, her laughter, her love of nature, of music, of stories, of people, of ice cream, and chocolate. All fiercely protected by the superpower of love; guarded by friends and family. She is full of grace.

It’s a long, detailed read. You can’t help but feel the love and well up with a sense of empathy at the same time.


It’s another Friday of great reads. Please take the time to click through and read all that these bloggers are offerings.

And then, make sure that you’re following them on Twitter.

  • @sig225
  • @TESLontario
  • @dunlop_sue
  • @PCMalteseFalcon
  • @sbruyns
  • @pbeens
  • @redknine

This post appeared on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Because of the holidays, I had accumulated a collection of great blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers. Now, it’s time to get caught up!


New Wheels

I don’t know about you but I love shopping for a new vehicle. There’s so much to be learned from figuring out what’s on the market and doing a vehicle comparison to comparison and then the biggy – what’s my trade-in worth.

Before Christmas, Diana Maliszewski went through the process and bought herself a brand new car.

If you’ve ever been through the process, you’ll love this post. It’s got it all…

  • memories of old cars
  • advice from friends and colleagues
  • doing the footwork going in
  • comparing products (Diana uses a Google document to do that – every car salesperson’s worst nightmare)
  • narrowing the field

and then buying! Read the post to check out what she bought and how she haggled.

p.s. her new vehicle squints


Learning from Strangers Online

As Jennifer Casa-Todd notes, we’ve all passed along the advice about “Stranger Danger” and given the warning about what could happen when you friend the wrong person.

The problem, though, is that connecting with the “right stranger” can be one of the more powerful things that you can do in the classroom. So, where’s the magic moment when this can happen?

In this post, Jennifer shares her thoughts including an example of another teacher trying to make meaningful connections for his class. In particular, individuals were in search of mentors.

It’s a nice testament to just what can happen and you might just land yourself in a position of making an important connection.

I couldn’t miss the irony that Jennifer had me do some proofreading online of her book and that was before we had ever met face to face. It wasn’t an entirely random event; I like to think that she chose wisely.


Konmaring* Relationships

In this post, Debbie Donsky brings in a connection between relationships and Marie Kondo’s philosophy of getting rid of things that don’t bring you joy.

In this, “things” might also include relationships. As Debbie notes in this rather long post/story, not all friendships are for a lifetime.

I guess that makes a great deal of sense although I hadn’t thought about it in this way before. She notes that, at times, maintaining the relationships and friendships can be a challenge. Given her history and movement through education channels, I can completely understand.

She suggests some things

  1. Commit yourself to think about the relationships/friendships you have in your life.
  2. Imagine what an ideal relationship/friendship would feel like, sound like.(For example if it is a coach, a mentor, a colleague)
  3. Sincerely thank the person for the relationship/friendship you have had with them.
  4. Consider if this is a professional or personal relationship/friendship and what boundaries you might need to create to maintain or grow the relationship.
  5. Ask yourself if this relationship/friendship sparks joy.

If it doesn’t spark joy, then there are things that need to be done.

If those relationships are maintained via social media, there are quick and easy ways to remove those that don’t spark joy for you. I think there is another element to be considered; people often do take actions in a harsh manner. Are you prepared for the consequences?


One Word x 12

It’s the new year and one thing that you often notice in blogging and other social media is people identifying and presumably acting on their One Word for 2020. You can follow the discussion in Ontario with the hashtag @OneWordONT. Donna Fry is trying to push the concept Canada wide here.

Beth Lyons is taking a interesting and non-standard (if there is something standard…) approach. She’s not committed to one word for twelve months. Instead, she’s looking for one word per month. In her post, there are no rules against using the same word more than once so that’s an opportunity to continue or reuse.

She builds a good case for what she’s proposing. I wonder if those who read her blog might jump the traditional approach in favour of this. She doesn’t offer 12 words yet – but has a good start.

The good thing is that she’s planning to commit a blog post to each over the year so blog readers (and people who write or podcast about others’ blog posts) will be the big winners.


What is the purpose of a bulletin board?

From my year at the Faculty of Education, it was drilled into us to have bulletin boards that looked great so that when you got inspected and evaluated, whoever was the classroom guest would be impressed. Oh, and also, make sure that they are changed before your second inspection. Why, oh why, do I remember stuff like that?

Deborah Weston gives a nice discussion about the various ways that bulletin boards can be handled. The rationale I gave above isn’t one of them!

I always used bulletin boards but they were created by students as part of their research and assessment. It kept them fresh and allowed students to do something unique and different. They absolutely did a better job than what I could have done.

There was a move a few years ago to display all kinds of achievement data there; thank goodness we’ve gone beyond that.

Deborah gives a nice list of ideas; they’re well worth reading and considering. They’re not all on the same train of thought and that can only be a good thing.

I really like this piece of advice.

For me, in the end what matters is that the students feel like the classroom belongs to them as they have designed it – like an extension of their home space.


THE RECLINER AND MY READING APORIA

I thought that, after reading the first paragraph of this post from Alanna King, that we were going to really get into the concept of recliner chairs. For me, it’s my very best working space. Period. End of Concept.

What else ya got Alanna?

Actually, she’s got a great deal more than that and the topic has nothing to do with recliners! I really enjoyed her walk through authors and concepts. She openly identifies and shares what she considers her biases – we all have them so we shouldn’t feel too badly about that – but I think it’s different from the mind of a teacher-librarian.

As a human, we know what we like to read and naturally gravitate to it. We know when we feel we should be pushed and we might do so at times. But, when you’re crafting a literacy resource for an entire school, it’s an entirely different ball game. You need to not only consider yourself but everyone else.

My immediate thought was about schools who don’t have teacher-librarians championing the acquisition of resources and understanding a school of a thousand or so with differing needs. How can they even presume to play on the same field? A teacher-librarian is so crucial.

I also did have a bit of a smile; I don’t know if Alanna gave us a quick tour of her school’s library or of the books that you could see from sitting in that new recliner.


Tears Now, Acceptance Later

Eva Thompson’s back at the keyboard! Yay!

Good teachers observe and this is what she’s seeing…

More and more I see students stressed out, succumbing to anxiety, feeling isolated and struggling with self esteem.  Part of these issues are tied into school performance and acceptance. I need to address it in my programming. I must.

As a teacher of the gifted, Eva’s students would be an interesting collection. Academically, they may well not have been challenged at the same level as others. It’s easy to understand because there are lots of other students in the regular classroom that would be seemingly needing more attention.

As a result, Eva is working hard to challenge her students and providing situations where they WILL fail. (Emphasis hers)

It’s an interesting read and works as a reminder that not all students are the same and they shouldn’t be treated or even challenged in the same way.


It’s a great blogging start to 2020. Please take the time to visit these terrific posts and drop off a comment or two.

Then, make sure that you’re following these folks on Twitter.

  • @MzMollyTL
  • @jcasatodd
  • @DebbieDonsky
  • @MrsLyonsLibrary
  • @DrDWestonPhD
  • @banana29
  • @leftyeva

This post appeared on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


This week was a time for a special edition of voicEd’s This Week in Ontario EduBlogs. In addition to a whole bunch of fun and looking at some bloopers, it was a chance for Stephen and I to identify and look at some of the blog posts that really resonated with us this past year.

I hesitate to call them the “best of” as is done in so many places. I like the posts that appear here weekly and they truly are the best thoughts that the authors have to share at the time. In this case, for the show, we tried to find really personal reasons about the posts selected.

They appear below with my original commentary from this blog at the time.

The podcast is available at this link: https://voiced.ca/podcast_episode_post/december-31-looking-back-twioe-in-2019/

I’d like to thank Paul McGuire, Aviva Dunsiger, and Lynn Thomas for being so kind as to share some of their thoughts during the show.


This post was selected by Stephen and, for him, it was a message about parenting, testing, and measuring what is really important.

This appeared on May 24.

Dear Jordan…

One of the powerful things about blogging is that, at least for now, your thoughts will be there forever. (or until you delete it or the service goes away or … well, you get my meaning)

One of the things that Patt Olivieri will have a chance to do with her son is share this post when he’s old enough to fully appreciate it.

In education, we know all about assessment, evaluation, and data points. Our system and our jobs thrive on it. It’s one of the things that separate education workers from other workers. It’s scientific, artistic, and humanist all at the same time.

It’s not as powerful as a mother’s love for her child.

You see, my love, there is no test for all of this, no grade, no level that can ever capture the everyday, ordinary stuff that accumulates to the only stuff that can ever be measured in immeasurable ways.

Wow.

If you’re a parent, you’ll be moved by this post.


Another chosen by Stephen who loves metaphores. This is the second post from Anne-Marie Kees and her thoughts about trees.

This appeared on December 13.

What do trees have to do with well-being? (Trees Part Two)

A while back, I read Part One of Anne-Marie Kee’s thoughts about trees, in particular as they apply to Lakefield College School.

This is an interesting followup as she reflects on trees and how they grow, survive, and thrive. In particular, she shares some interesting observations about community and deep or not-so-deep roots in the section dealing with myths.

Towards the end, she turns to how it is so similar to today’s teenagers. Trees help each other grow and so do teenagers. In fact, by giving them the opportunity to take on more responsibility in truly meaningful ways, you do help the process. Not surprisingly, she makes the important connection to mental health and well-being.

I know that we all think we do that. Maybe it’s time to take a second look and really focus on the “meaningful”.


My first selection is a reminder that, no matter what good we think we may have seen in society or schools, there is still work to be done. I find it sad that this post had to be written, but Matthew Morris did it.

This appeared on August 30.

I Think My Neighbors Think I’m Selling Dope

This isn’t a post that I could write but Matthew Morris could – and did.

Recently, he moved and is now a part of a condo community but, according to the post, he hasn’t been accepted into that community as of yet.

In the elevator, I try to extend my courtesies with “good mornings” and “what floor?” with folks who happen to share the space with me. I’ve been met with cold responses and void eye contact.

Beyond the fact that he’s young, a person of colour, he’s a teacher. Consequently, he doesn’t go to work during the usual times in these summer months.

It’s a very personal post describing his life as he see it currently. I hope that it makes you think. Then, he does a shift and asks you to think of those students in your classroom where perhaps you have made or will make assumptions about.

He helps by having you walk in his shoes.


Much has been said about the cuts already done in Ontario and what’s on the way. If only there was a plan but I think the term “mindless” is used at its very best in the title.

This appeared on June 7.

Mindless cuts to education puts our future at risk

Charles Pascal tagged me in this op-ed piece he wrote for the Wellington Times. He had me hooked at the first paragraph…

A growing number of Ontarians are being hurt—and our shared future placed at risk—by the moment by moment uninformed decision-making by the current government at Queen’s Park. Led by an unthinking premier and enabled by a spineless cabinet, we are in the midst of a very damaging period in our political history.

Charles’ passion for society and education come through loudly and clearly as he challenges many of the assumptions that the current government has made as it has been making the cuts that we seem to hear more and more about each day.

There is an important message that shouldn’t go unnoticed in all of this. It’s easy to see the impact of cuts on students in the classroom but Charles points out that a child’s life is more than just going to school. Cuts can have the impact at many other points.

Set aside some time to read and understand the important message he’s crafted in this article – and then pass it along to colleagues and friends.


Every time I read a post from Deborah, I feel like saying “I’m not worthy”. More than a post, they often read like research articles. This time she takes on virtual reality and thoughts from Kyle Pearce.

This appeared on May 17.

Virtual Reality in the Math Class: Moving from Abstract to Concrete

I’ve been playing around with Virtual Reality off and on ever since I heard of the concept. Most of the applications are pretty predictable – you know – explore a world that may or may not exist in real life because you can. You might experience something unique and different.

One thing that I’ve tried every now and again with limited success is to create my own virtual reality environment. I think that would be the ultimate use of technology and the concept. I’ve come to the conclusion that this is something that I need to grow in to and to have better equipment.

But, back to this post from Deborah McCallum. Her posts are always inspirational and have me thinking about things I might not have ordinarily thought of.

She was inspired by a post from Kyle Pearce about moving from the concrete to the abstract in mathematics. She talks about the opposite – going in the other direction – from abstract to concrete. I like her thinking and it enhances the original thoughts from Kyle’s post.

I think that this may be a new frontier for exploration. In Kyle’s original post, he uses a doughnut example. I think I’d really enjoy Deborah taking on the opposite direction and perhaps show how a concrete approach could turn into consolidation. And, what sort of gear would be required.

Is there room for both Kyle and Deborah’s thinking? I think so.


It was great to look back at the year. I’ve shared the complete lists of wonderful posts over the past couple of weeks. They’re a testament to the great thinking and inspiration from Ontario Educators.

I’m looking forward to more in 2020.

BTW, you can follow these bloggers on Twitter at:

This post appeared on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

Year end at voicEd Radio


This morning, at 9:15, there will be a very special broadcast of This Week in Ontario Edublogs on voicEd Radio. It’s not quite Wednesday, but it is the end of the year. For Stephen Hurley and me, it was a year of getting together on Wednesday mornings to talk about a selection of blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers. Except for a few weeks this summer when Stephen went off the grid, we were pretty faithful in meeting that time commitment.

If you read my blog post last Friday, I had put together a list of all of the blog posts that made my This Week in Ontario Edublogs blog post on Friday mornings. Of those, five were talked about on the radio show. Two were held back for the post. The original list featured the Friday posts; the list you’ll find below are those that were discussed on Wednesday morning.

It wasn’t something that I had kept track of; it was just when Stephen and I thought to do a special end of year show that I went to work and created the document. It was actually pretty easy. I share a Google Document with Stephen and it was just a matter of going through the document and grabbing the information. A typical entry looks like this:

During the summer, we invite guests to come on the show with us. It’s just a matter of sharing this document with them so they know the posts, where it’s located, and some of my thoughts. We had a great group join us this year.

  • July 3 – Peter Cameron
  • July 10 – The BeastEDU – Andrea Kerr, Kelly MacKay
  • August 14 – Terry Greene
  • August 21 – Lynn Thomas
  • August 27 – Beth Lyons
  • November 6 – Ramona Meharg (at the Bring IT, Together Conference)

It’s so nice to be able to reach out and have these folks join us. Of course, they’re all bloggers themselves.

At one point in the show, Stephen and I made reference to ourselves as the old guys in the balcony from The Muppets. It was Diana Maliszewski that either knew or did the research to let us know that they actually had names – Statler and Waldorf.

If people only knew!

The best part of the show happens in the 15 minutes before the show actually goes live. We do our sound check and get caught up on the week’s events.

I’m constantly amazed that we’re able to make it work. Things are so low-tech on my end. Just a computer, an external monitor, a Samsung set of earbuds, and an internet connection. All the magic happens on Stephen’s end where he sets up things and then we go live. All of the shows are posted on the voicEd site.

So, we’ve been busy putting things together for this year end show. I hate to use the term “best of 2019” because all of the blog posts that we chat about weekly are excellent and insightful. Without the regular amazing content, there would be a lot of dead air.

And, thanks to a suggestions from Sheila Stewart, there will be a blooper section although I’ll point out that it’s not really fair. We do the show live but most listeners hear it later via podcast. By that point in time, Stephen has had the opportunity to edit out any fluffs on his part. Mine remain!

And, here’s the complete list of amazing bloggers and their blog titles that we had a chance to chat about on the show. Sometimes, we even stayed on topic.

I hope that you can join us this morning at 9:15.

BloggerBlog post title
Alanna King – @banana29Leaping with no net: autism for teens in Ontario
How to coddle a volunteer
UX/UI Design with Canada Learning Code
Albert Fong – @albertfongTeachers tell stories
Amanda Potts – @AhpottsWhy he comes to class
He may be right; I may be crazy
He talks about me at home
Exam
When friendship lasts
Enough
For Mrs. Barkman
Amy Bowker – @amyebowkerGoal Setting in the Classroom
Andrea Haefele – @andreahaefeleDear Other Mom
Andrew Campbell – @acampbell99An Alternative To A School Cellphone Ban
Ann Marie Luce – @turnmeluceThe value of the Exit Interview
#EdcampBeijing
Morale Compass
#oneword2019
Anna Bartosik – @ambartosikCitation practices, using databases, and literature reviews #MyResearch
Anne Shillolo – @anneshilloloOnline Pre-School
Anne-Marie Kee – @AMKeeLCSShould schools ban cell-phones?
What do trees have to do with well-being? (Trees Part Two)
Focus on Trees – Part One
Arianna Lambert – @MsALambertHour of Code Is Coming…
Association for Media Literacy – @A_M_LTaking Old Town Road to School
Aviva Dunsiger – @avivalocaMy Look At The Holidays: What Are Your Stories?
Back To The Map Of Canada: What Do You Do With That 2%?
Wondering About WHMIS: When Compliance Training Makes You Reflect On Assessment & Evaluation
What Makes A Partnership Work?
What Do You Do On A Perfect Day?
How Do We Use Our Powerful Words For Good?
Educating Grayson: How Do We Make Inclusion Work?
Beate Planche – @bmplancheMomentum and the positive side of constraints
Beth Lyons – @mrslyonslibrarySharing the LLC Space- An Advocate’s Infographic
Maker. Space. Inquiry. Place. What might be the connection?
What the Librarian Read Part 1
On Being a “Teacher-Librarian”
Preserving the Cup
Podcast PD?
Social Media- What is it good for?
Bonnie Stewart – @bonstewartExperience Required: Walking the Talk in Digital Teaching & Learning
The #UWinToolParade: Open Pedagogy as #OER
Brenda Sherry – @brendasherryExploring By The Seat of Your Pants
Cal Armstrong – @sig225The structure of the Interstitial App, or, Observations & Conversations – Part 2
Charles Pascal – @CEPascalMindless cuts to education puts our future at risk
Colleen Rose – @ColleenKRTake 10 Minutes
A Stitch in Time
David Carruthers – @dcarrutherseduGo Magic! Let’s do this! 🙂
Do You Have A Safety Net?
Reflections from the Tech Guy
David Petro – @davidpetro314Math Links for Week Ending Jan 25th, 2019
Deanna McLennan – @McLennan1977Autumn Math Walk
What does the equal sign really mean?
Deb Weston – @dr_weston_PhDClass Size and Composition Matters
Why students walked out today – April 4th, 2019
Debbie Donsky – @DebbieDonskyFrom Compliance to Commitment Takes Personal Accountability
A Career Marked by Change: Learning the Big Lessons in Some Small Places
“You aren’t what I was expecting…”
The Fear of Writing: Finding Your Voice When Writing within an Organization
Deborah McCallum – @BigideasineduLeadership & Goal Setting for Math Learning
Guided Reading for Math?
Virtual Reality in the Math Class: Moving from Abstract to Concrete
Guided Reading with Adolescent Readers
Derek Tangredi – @dtangredWorking with Children in Makerspaces
Diana Maliszewski – @MzMollyTLFirst Day Back
Reconnecting with my cultural roots
Making Kindergarten Media Projects with Meaning
The Gift of Staying Connected – Thanks Andrew and Diana
Further Reflections after Faith in the System Podcast
Reflections on NAMLE Part 1
Happy 40th Anniversary AML!
Diana Maliszewski and Neil Andersen – @MzMollyTLBaby It’s Cold Outside: The Saga of a Song
Fair Chance Learning – @FCLEduIndigenous Institute Blends Tradition & Tech to Preserve Anishinaabe Teachings
Using Technology to Drive Language Skills and Create Meaningful Learning Opportunities
Fleming College Learning Design and Support Team Blog – @FlemingLDSWeek 4, Winter 2019
Heather Swail – @hbswailTMB Withdrawal
Heather Theijsmeijer – @HTheijsmeijerFirst Week of Math: Resources to help make connections & build relationships
Making the Shift Toward Tracking Observations
Heidi Solway – @hsolwayRoll Out The Red Carpet
Helen DeWaard – @hj_dewaardThinking about Feedback
Ian McTavish – @ianmctClass size changes – my perspective. #ontedannouncement
Indygo Arscott – @decolonizeontOntario Students Hold Walkouts in Protest of Progressive Conservative Party’s Policy Proposals
Irene Stewart – @IrenequStewartIrene learns about teaching: Part 1a
Irene learns about teaching – Part 1b
Interviewing My Domain
James M Skidmore – @JamesMSkidmoreA MODEST SOTL PLAN: WORKING WITH LITERARY PASSAGES
Jamey Byers – @mrJameyByersBOOKMARKS ON TWITTER
Jay DuBois – @Jay__DuboisThe Grade 3 ‘Travelling Genius Bar’
Jen Giffen – @virtualGiffAnother Day another EdTech conference! #ECOOCamp 2019
Jennifer Aston – @mme_astonThis Blog is not Dead it’s…
Another One Bites the Dust?
Parlons Minecraft BIT2019
Building a Google Site and Relationships with Parents
A Tale That Endures
Jennifer Brown – @JennMacBrownReflection and Self-indulgence
Jennifer Casa-Todd – @jcasatoddThree lessons on Grit and Resilience
My device. My terms. 3 strategies for finding balance.
No Wifi: Pretend it’s 1993
What school and Curling have in common
Jessica O’Reilly – @Cambrian_JessSo Why SoTL?
Sidney Helped
Finding Middle Ground
Jessica Outram – @jessicaoutramMoccasin Flowers: A Work-in-Progress
Jim Cash – @cashjimWhy do you want kids to code?
Mathland Actually
Scratch 3.0 is Here!
Joe Archer – @ArcherJoeExploring Classroom Expectations while using WipeBook Chart Paper
Swimming with my fish! Do it ALL!!
Joel McLean – @jprofNBThe DNA of a leader
“I Don’t Have Time For That”
R.E.A.L. Leadership
Find A Vision
A Positive Climate For A Culture Of Growth
John Allan – @mrpottzSTUDENT INFOGRAPHICS
TESOL’S ELECTRONIC VILLAGE ONLINE
Jonathan So – @MrSoClassroomPerseverance, struggle and a little grit: How running a 53km race relates to Education
Judy Redknine, Toby Molouba – @redknine and @tmoloubaIt’s a Matter of Relationships
Karaline Vlahopoulos – @KaralineVla99 Needs and They’re All Student Related
Kelly McLaughlinSchool year start up
Kyle Pearce – @MathletePearceHOW TO START THE SCHOOL YEAR OFF RIGHT
Kyleen Gray – @TCHevolutionThe problem(s) with mandatory e-learning…
Why (as a teacher and parent) I Value Standardized Testing
Arguments for Teacher Performance Pay in Ontario
Laura Bottrell – @L_BottrellRethinking End of Year Countdowns
Laura Elliott – @lauraelliottPhDStandardized bodies < Accepting & Celebrating Difference
My ‘Why?’ …
Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261This week we did…something
MATH, NUMBER SENSE & NUMERATION, NUMBER TALKS, PATTERNING & ALGEBRA
Update: Assessment
Slice is of Life: Who Needs Me?
Day 3: Relax
Summer Math:Counting and Subitizing
Lisa Cranston – @lisacranWe teach students not just content
Beyond Behaviour Charts
Lisa Floyd – @lisaannefloydText to Speech and Translation Blocks in Scratch 3.0
Lynn Thomas – @THOMLYNN101H is for Happy
F is for Frankenstein, Focus & Future Ready
D is for Debate
B is for Brainy, Bold & Beautiful
Q is for Questions and Not Getting Caught in the Quagmire
P is for Patience
O is for Outside the Box
L is for light
Mark Chubb – @MarkChubb3Strategies vs Models
One-Hole Punch Puzzle Templates
The More Strategies, the Better?
Martina Fasano – @RokStarTeacherWhy Caring Adults Matter: An Ode To My Alma Mater
Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorrisCell Phone Ban in Classrooms
Does Black History Month still hold meaning in 2019
5 School Ideas for Black History Month
Detentions
I Think My Neighbors Think I’m Selling Dope
Matthew Oldridge – @matthewoldridgeUsing Play to Teach Math
Too Random, Or Not Random Enough: Student Misunderstandings About Probability In Coin Flipping
Melanie Lefebvre – @ProfvocateMelWHY FRUSTRATED STUDENTS MADE MY DAY TODAY
An Oscar-esque thank you speech type of blog post
I DON’T USE TEXTBOOKS
Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadioNurturing Guilt
Merit Centre – @Self_RegA Self-Reg Look At “Preparing Kids”: Is It Time To Change The Conversation?
No Such Thing as a Bad Kid
Michelle Fenn – @toadmummyThe Gender Gap in Technology
Coding with Microbits
Mike Washburn – @misterwashburnWHEN LAST PLACE FEELS LIKE FIRST PLACE
Nancy DrewReckless Abandon!
Noa Daniel – @noasbobsPitch Day 2019
Elevate your Audience
My River, My Mountain- A Day of Learning with Jennifer Abrams
Patt Olivieri – @pattolivieriDear Jordan…
Paul Gauchi – @PCMalteseFalconFriday Two Cents: Positive Thoughts For The New Year
Friday Two Cents: Honour Our Past To Understand Our Present
Paul McGuire – @mcguirpWhen your plan is no longer the plan
Tour de Mont Blanc – Day Eight for Climb for Kids
When it comes to mental health in Canada, the gap is still too wide
“What Do You Say When Our Social Institutions Are Under Attack?”
Trolls Creep Into the Education Debate in Ontario
Self-Regulation and Evangelism in Education
Class Sizes Really Matter
Has inclusive education gone too far? – The Globe and Mail debate
Naming and Shaming
Walking in a New Way – the Ottawa Indigenous Walk
Peter Beens – @pbeensSnippets #1
Students’ Favourite Affinity Designer Tutorials
Peter Cameron – @cherandpeteGO! Explore!
Find your inner explorer
A Day (or three) in the Life of this Grosvenor Teacher Fellow
For Water: Learn. Adopt. Protect. Walk.
Our Kids’ Spelling is Atrocious
Peter Skillen – @peterskillenDear Ontario Educators,
Ramona Meharg – @ramonameharg#ECOOCamp Owen Sound
50th Episode – I Wish I Knew EDU learning
Snow Day Chaos – the Lament is over!
Fill Your Own Cup With Gratitude
Rebecca Chambers – @MrsRChambersAnother Year and The Unlearning Continues
Dreams do come true if you persevere, my vision of an experiential passion based classroom have come true.
Rob Cannone – @mr_robcannoneIf not now, then when?
Designing the Learning Environment : Why students, pedagogy and critical reflection should come first
On cultivating curiosity in the classroom
Rola Tibshirani – @rolatHow To Self Engineer A Learning Community?
When Students Shine!
Rolland Chidiac – @rchidsEsports with Primary Students – Part 1: Jumping In
Esports in Primary – Part 2: Next Steps
Ruthie Sloan – @RoosloanSecret Truths of Empathy While Learning to Advocate
Context is Key
Sean Monteith – @KPDSB_SchoolsA New Year, Perspective From Experience
It’s “Time”
Sheila Stewart – @sheilaspeakingMinding the Children
Chocolate by Trial and Error
Good Tree Stories
Shelly Vohra – @raspberryberet3Inquiry, Social Justice, & the SDGs
Digital Breakouts Using Google Forms
ETFO Innovate 2019
Shyama Sunder – @ssunderaswaraFinal Thoughts
STAO Blog – @staoapsoExperiment of The Week – Homemade Projector by Steve Spangler
KEEPING BIRDS SAFE INQUIRY – GRADE 1
Stepan Pruchnicky – @stepanpruchReader’s Theatre = Experiential Learning
Canada’s New Food Guide
Sue Bruyns – @sbruynsHere’s to Paving New Ground
Adjust the Tuning
Proofreader or Instructional Leader?
Sue Dunlop – @Dunlop_SueWhy Summer is a Perfect Time for Reflection
Are You Caught in the Whirlwind?
Just Stop Using “You Guys”
T.J. Hoogsteen – @marexdad21st Century Skills: What Students Need Now or Just More of the Same Bad Ideas?
TDSB Professional Library – @ProfLibraryTDSBNew books: take an eReading March break!
Terry Greene – @greeneterrySo Long and Thanks For All of This
The Open Learner Patchbook Went To The PressEd Conference
Hatching a PLN
Reset, Reboot, RemOOC
Thanks Milan – Lessons Learned at #OEGlobal19
Feeling the Ground by Getting Some Air
What’s With All The Sharing?
TESLOntario Blog – @TESLontarioWHO HAS THE FINAL SAY ABOUT STUDENT MARKS?
The Beast – @thebeasteduA Guy Walks into a Bar
I Am Right Here
Keys to a Rocket Ship
Recess is as Real Life as it Gets
The Merit Centre – @self_regWords Matter. But Sometimes the Interbrain Matters More.
Tim King – @mechsympStretched Thin
Tim King – @tk1ngPrivilege Masquerading as Superiority
Class Caps are a Low Resolution Solution to a High Resolution Problem
Cyber Dissonance: The Struggle for Access, Privacy & Control in our Networked World
2019-20: Persistence and Possibility
Tina Zita – @tina_zitaA Journey with Sketchnotes
Will Gourley – @WillGourleyShoulders of giants
Undercover Boss
Beyond
Be Strong in the Face of Poor Government
Back in the day was better (because now is often unbearable)
The best present is one you can give year round
Zelia Tavares‏ – @zeliamctSkype-A-Thon 2019
EdTechTeam Ontario Summit 2019
Hack the Classroom 2018

This Year in Ontario Edublogs


Yes, you read that correctly and it’s not a typo. The normal post for a Friday morning around here is “This Week in Ontario Edublogs” but this is a bit different.

I’ve been doing that post for a long time now. Using WordPress’ duplicate title feature, that title has appeared 389 times. There are actually a few more because I’ve made typos and called it “The Week in Ontario Edublogs” a few times. So, if there are 52 weeks in a year, 52 goes into more than 389

a whole bunch of times. Actually, that’s a post a day for a year and then some.

So, why did I start to do this?

It goes back a while (I’m still doing the math). Blogging was kind of young and there were blogging recommendations that people would share. The problem this Ontarian realized, was there were a lot of blogs written right here in the province – why aren’t we shouting from the rooftops the amazing things we’re doing here? dougpete.wordpress.com was my rooftop.

I stored, and continue to store, Ontario Educational blogs here. Some remain and others have come and gone; if nothing else, it’s a collection of professionals who have shared their thinking for the world to read.

This week, I’ve done something that I’ve wanted to do for a while now. Next week during our weekly podcast, Stephen Hurley and I will be doing a year-end summary so I wanted to create a document of all of the blog posts that we talked about on a weekly basis. Now, that document which I’ve since shared with him doesn’t include all of the posts that I write for my blog post. Typically, we talk about five on the show; then there’s a couple extra I add just for here. I don’t want him stealing all my readers!

It took a while but I went through all of the posts on this blog that I use to celebrate great Ontario blogging on Fridays. I really hope I captured them all. You’ll understand if I say that my eyes got crossed a few times. Of course, there are people who have been featured numerous times here. They obviously love to blog and share their ideas and I love to read them. There was a time when I would leave comments on their blogs. But, by putting them here, I’m in control and can sometimes offer more than just words.

Before I share the list from you, let me step back from the rooftop and go to street level and look up at these people. As I was working this document, I was just in so much awe as I revisited their titles and what I had written about them at the time. There is absolutely so much great writing and reflection. I am truly, truly humbled by looking at it. I hope that you don’t skip past this. Please take some time and look at the titles and the wide variety of content and wisdom that was shared.

I’m already having blogger’s remorse as I look at the finished product. There were some things that I could have done better. This was originally not going to go beyond the two of us but it was too impressive not to share.

But, there’s always next year.

Please enjoy and appreciate the absolute genius in the content that has been shared with the world this past year. Ontario bloggers are a terrific example of what people who are serious about their profession do. They share successes, outline next steps, and then push themselves to higher levels. I can think of no higher praise for both their efforts as bloggers or their dedication to learning and their profession.

BloggerPost
Alanna King – @banana29Leaping with no net: autism for teens in Ontario
How to coddle a volunteer
UX/UI Design with Canada Learning Code
HTML/CSS with Canada Learning Code
When Political Penny-Pinchers Pilfer Your PD
Albert Fong – @albertfongTeachers tell stories
Amanda Potts – @AhpottsWhy he comes to class
He may be right; I may be crazy
He talks about me at home
Exam
When friendship lasts
Enough
For Mrs. Barkman
Amy Bowker – @amyebowkerGoal Setting in the Classroom
Andrea Haefele – @andreahaefeleDear Other Mom
Andrew Campbell – @acampbell99An Alternative To A School Cellphone Ban
Your Students Should Nap (and so should you)
Ann Marie Luce – @turnmeluceThe value of the Exit Interview
#EdcampBeijing
Morale Compass
#oneword2019
Anna Bartosik – @ambartosikCitation practices, using databases, and literature reviews #MyResearch
Independent Reading and Research, Week 1: Data Tool Analysis #MyResearch
Anne Shillolo – @anneshilloloOnline Pre-School
Anne-Marie Kee – @AMKeeLCSShould schools ban cell-phones?
What do trees have to do with well-being? (Trees Part Two)
Focus on Trees – Part One
Have you ever put a tooth in the microwave?
Arianna Lambert – @MsALambertHour of Code Is Coming…
Podcasts for Students
Long-Range Plans
The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning Resource
Association for Media Literacy – @A_M_LTaking Old Town Road to School
Aviva Dunsiger – @avivalocaMy Look At The Holidays: What Are Your Stories?
Back To The Map Of Canada: What Do You Do With That 2%?
Wondering About WHMIS: When Compliance Training Makes You Reflect On Assessment & Evaluation
What Makes A Partnership Work?
What Do You Do On A Perfect Day?
How Do We Use Our Powerful Words For Good?
Educating Grayson: How Do We Make Inclusion Work?
Do We Need A Scaffolded Approach to Bullying
A Lot More Good …
How Do You Define Beauty?
When “Dear Other Mom” Becomes “Dear Educators And Parents”
Can Kids Understand Equity?
This is WHY I Speak Up. Why Do You?
Beate Planche – @bmplancheMomentum and the positive side of constraints
Beth Lyons – @mrslyonslibrarySharing the LLC Space- An Advocate’s Infographic
Maker. Space. Inquiry. Place. What might be the connection?
What the Librarian Read Part 1
On Being a “Teacher-Librarian”
Preserving the Cup
Podcast PD?
Social Media- What is it good for?
Preserving the Cup
Bonnie Stewart – @bonstewartExperience Required: Walking the Talk in Digital Teaching & Learning
The #UWinToolParade: Open Pedagogy as #OER
bringing back the participatory: a story of the #ProSocialWeb
Brenda Sherry – @brendasherryExploring By The Seat of Your Pants
No First Day Jitters This Year!
Cal Armstrong – @sig225The structure of the Interstitial App, or, Observations & Conversations – Part 2
Observations & Conversations: Part 1 of many?
Choose your own… PD.
Charles Pascal – @CEPascalMindless cuts to education puts our future at risk
Colleen Rose – @ColleenKRTake 10 Minutes
A Stitch in Time
Keep it Simple. (thanks, Rachel)
Conrad Glogowski – @teachandlearnPodcasts on Youth Development
David Carruthers – @dcarrutherseduGo Magic! Let’s do this! 🙂
Do You Have A Safety Net?
Reflections from the Tech Guy
David Petro – @davidpetro314Math Links for Week Ending Jan 25th, 2019
Math Links for Week Ending Oct. 25th, 2019
Math Links for Week Ending May 3rd, 2019
Deanna McLennan – @McLennan1977Autumn Math Walk
What does the equal sign really mean?
Deb Weston – @dr_weston_PhDClass Size and Composition Matters
Why students walked out today – April 4th, 2019
Did you get your flu shot yet?
Violence in Ontario Schools
Evaluating e-learning
The Courage to Teach
Debbie Donsky – @DebbieDonskyFrom Compliance to Commitment Takes Personal Accountability
A Career Marked by Change: Learning the Big Lessons in Some Small Places
“You aren’t what I was expecting…”
The Fear of Writing: Finding Your Voice When Writing within an Organization
The Caterpillar Math Problem: Is it possible to be unbiased in our assessment?
Deborah McCallum – @BigideasineduLeadership & Goal Setting for Math Learning
Guided Reading for Math?
Virtual Reality in the Math Class: Moving from Abstract to Concrete
Guided Reading with Adolescent Readers
Make your Feedback more Productive
Supporting Struggling Students in Math
Derek Tangredi – @dtangredWorking with Children in Makerspaces
Diana Maliszewski – @MzMollyTLFirst Day Back
Reconnecting with my cultural roots
Making Kindergarten Media Projects with Meaning
The Gift of Staying Connected – Thanks Andrew and Diana
Further Reflections after Faith in the System Podcast
Reflections on NAMLE Part 1
Happy 40th Anniversary AML!
Hit By A Car
Reflections on NAMLE Part 2
Reflections on NAMLE Part 3
Happy #DLweekTO
Full STEAM ahead with Blue Spruce Books
My Many Microaggressions
Diana Maliszewski and Neil Andersen – @MzMollyTL and @mediaseeBaby It’s Cold Outside: The Saga of a Song
ECOO – @ecooorgECOOcamp Owen Sound 2019
Fair Chance Learning – @FCLEduIndigenous Institute Blends Tradition & Tech to Preserve Anishinaabe Teachings
Using Technology to Drive Language Skills and Create Meaningful Learning Opportunities
Implementing Survivor Mode into Student Learning in MinecraftEE
HP Maker Challenge
Fleming College Learning Design and Support Team Blog – @FlemingLDSWeek 4, Winter 2019
Harnessing Assessment – @HarnessingADescriptive Feedback: The Engine that Powers Learning
Hatch Coding – @hatchcodingSpending time with professional teachers
Heather Lye – @MsHLyeBittersweet Year End
Heather Swail – @hbswailTMB Withdrawal
Heather Theijsmeijer – @HTheijsmeijerFirst Week of Math: Resources to help make connections & build relationships
Making the Shift Toward Tracking Observations
When a Drawing is Not Just a Drawing
Heidi Solway – @hsolwayRoll Out The Red Carpet
30 Days of Gratitude: Day 26 – The Perfection in Imperfection
Helen DeWaard – @hj_dewaardThinking about Feedback
Helen Kubiw – @HelenKubiwGoodnight, World
Ian McTavish – @ianmctClass size changes – my perspective. #ontedannouncement
Indigenous Awareness – @indigenousawrns‼️‼️ELECTION DAY‼️‼️
Indygo Arscott – @decolonizeontOntario Students Hold Walkouts in Protest of Progressive Conservative Party’s Policy Proposals
Irene Stewart – @IrenequStewartIrene learns about teaching: Part 1a
Irene learns about teaching – Part 1b
Interviewing My Domain
James M Skidmore – @JamesMSkidmoreA MODEST SOTL PLAN: WORKING WITH LITERARY PASSAGES
ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES
Jamey Byers – @mrJameyByersBOOKMARKS ON TWITTER
Jay DuBois – @Jay__DuboisThe Grade 3 ‘Travelling Genius Bar’
Reset?
Jen Apgar – @jenapgarDesign Thinking and 3D printing challenges
Jen Giffen – @virtualGiffAnother Day another EdTech conference! #ECOOCamp 2019
Twitter – To Reply or Reply All?
Jennifer Arp – @Jennifer_ArpFull-Day Kindergarten at it’s best: awesome things are happening in Room 102
Jennifer Aston – @mme_astonThis Blog is not Dead it’s…
Another One Bites the Dust?
Parlons Minecraft BIT2019
Building a Google Site and Relationships with Parents
A Tale That Endures
Jennifer Brown – @JennMacBrownReflection and Self-indulgence
Jennifer Casa-Todd – @jcasatoddThree lessons on Grit and Resilience
My device. My terms. 3 strategies for finding balance.
No Wifi: Pretend it’s 1993
What school and Curling have in common
The risk of digital leadership
Help! My child wants a YouTube channel
Five reasons why banning cellphones is a bad idea
Jessica O’Reilly – @Cambrian_JessSo Why SoTL?
Sidney Helped
Finding Middle Ground
Jessica Outram – @jessicaoutramMoccasin Flowers: A Work-in-Progress
Jim Cash – @cashjimWhy do you want kids to code?
Mathland Actually
Scratch 3.0 is Here!
Joanne Babalis – @joannebabalisSebby Dee turns 3!
Joe Archer – @ArcherJoeExploring Classroom Expectations while using WipeBook Chart Paper
Swimming with my fish! Do it ALL!!
Joel McLean – @jprofNBThe DNA of a leader
“I Don’t Have Time For That”
R.E.A.L. Leadership
Find A Vision
A Positive Climate For A Culture Of Growth
John Allan – @mrpottzSTUDENT INFOGRAPHICS
TESOL’S ELECTRONIC VILLAGE ONLINE
Jonathan So – @MrSoClassroomPerseverance, struggle and a little grit: How running a 53km race relates to Education
If we want our students to (insert word) it starts with us
Judy Redknine, Toby Molouba – @redknine and @tmoloubaIt’s a Matter of Relationships
Karaline Vlahopoulos – @KaralineVla99 Needs and They’re All Student Related
Kelly McLaughlinSchool year start up
Krista McCracken – @kristamccrackenCommunity Archives and Identity
Preserving and Listening to Soundscapes
Kyle Pearce – @MathletePearceHOW TO START THE SCHOOL YEAR OFF RIGHT
Kyleen Gray – @TCHevolutionThe problem(s) with mandatory e-learning…
Why (as a teacher and parent) I Value Standardized Testing
Arguments for Teacher Performance Pay in Ontario
Laura Bottrell – @L_BottrellRethinking End of Year Countdowns
Laura Elliott – @lauraelliottPhDStandardized bodies < Accepting & Celebrating Difference
My ‘Why?’ …
Helping our Girls Reframe Anxiety – it’s not all bad!
Laura Wheeler – @wheeler_lauraLearning in the Loo: Collaborative Kahoot Quiz
Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261This week we did…something
MATH, NUMBER SENSE & NUMERATION, NUMBER TALKS, PATTERNING & ALGEBRA
Update: Assessment
Slice is of Life: Who Needs Me?
Day 3: Relax
Summer Math:Counting and Subitizing
Slice of Life: Published
A little of this, a little of that
Writer’s Self-Regulations Project
Addition of double digit numbers
Lisa Cranston – @lisacranWe teach students not just content
Beyond Behaviour Charts
Self-Care for Writers
#HandsOffFDK
Lisa Floyd – @lisaannefloydText to Speech and Translation Blocks in Scratch 3.0
Lisa Munro – @LisaMunro11New Journeys
Liv Rondreau – @MissORondeauTHE MEDICINE WHEEL VS MASLOWS’S HIERACHY OF NEEDS
Lynn Thomas – @THOMLYNN101H is for Happy
F is for Frankenstein, Focus & Future Ready
D is for Debate
B is for Brainy, Bold & Beautiful
Q is for Questions and Not Getting Caught in the Quagmire
P is for Patience
O is for Outside the Box
L is for light
K is for Knowledge
Maggie Fay – @maggiefay_Hallway Connections: Autism and Coding via @maggiefay_
Mark Chubb – @MarkChubb3Strategies vs Models
One-Hole Punch Puzzle Templates
The More Strategies, the Better?
Marc Hodgkinson – @Mr_H_TeacherThe 500 – #452 – John Prine – Debut
Martina Fasano – @RokStarTeacherWhy Caring Adults Matter: An Ode To My Alma Mater
Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorrisCell Phone Ban in Classrooms
Does Black History Month still hold meaning in 2019
5 School Ideas for Black History Month
Detentions
I Think My Neighbors Think I’m Selling Dope
Equity Tech’quity
Speaking on and about black male students
Matthew Oldridge – @matthewoldridgeUsing Play to Teach Math
Too Random, Or Not Random Enough: Student Misunderstandings About Probability In Coin Flipping
The Playful Approach to Math
Melanie Lefebvre – @ProfvocateMelWHY FRUSTRATED STUDENTS MADE MY DAY TODAY
An Oscar-esque thank you speech type of blog post
I DON’T USE TEXTBOOKS
Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadioNurturing Guilt
Merit Centre – @Self_RegA Self-Reg Look At “Preparing Kids”: Is It Time To Change The Conversation?
No Such Thing as a Bad Kid
Michelle Fenn – @toadmummyThe Gender Gap in Technology
Coding with Microbits
Mike Washburn – @misterwashburnWHEN LAST PLACE FEELS LIKE FIRST PLACE
Nancy DrewReckless Abandon!
Neil Anderson – @mediaseeHighlights of the National Association of Media Literacy Educators Conference
Noa Daniel – @noasbobsPitch Day 2019
Elevate your Audience
My River, My Mountain- A Day of Learning with Jennifer Abrams
TTalks for Impact 2019
This Week in Ontario Playlists – Doug Peterson’s P3
Patt Olivieri – @pattolivieriDear Jordan…
Paul Gauchi – @PCMalteseFalconFriday Two Cents: Positive Thoughts For The New Year
Friday Two Cents: Honour Our Past To Understand Our Present
Friday Two Cents: The Language of Art
Comic Strips: School’s Out for Summer
Paul McGuire – @mcguirpWhen your plan is no longer the plan
Tour de Mont Blanc – Day Eight for Climb for Kids
When it comes to mental health in Canada, the gap is still too wide
“What Do You Say When Our Social Institutions Are Under Attack?”
Trolls Creep Into the Education Debate in Ontario
Self-Regulation and Evangelism in Education
Class Sizes Really Matter
Has inclusive education gone too far? – The Globe and Mail debate
Naming and Shaming
Walking in a New Way – the Ottawa Indigenous Walk
History in the Making – Creating Digital History Techbooks
New Beginnings, New Adventures
Your Professional Life is Declining and It’s About Time
Peter Beens – @pbeensSnippets #1
Students’ Favourite Affinity Designer Tutorials
100DaysofCode
Snowbirds
Peter Cameron – @cherandpeteGO! Explore!
Find your inner explorer
A Day (or three) in the Life of this Grosvenor Teacher Fellow
For Water: Learn. Adopt. Protect. Walk.
Our Kids’ Spelling is Atrocious
K Cups Math Resource Page
Water Walking
Ideal PD?
Peter Skillen – @peterskillenDear Ontario Educators,
Ramona Meharg – @RamonaMeharg#ECOOCamp Owen Sound
50th Episode – I Wish I Knew EDU learning
Snow Day Chaos – the Lament is over!
Fill Your Own Cup With Gratitude
#RememberingLeanne
#BIT19 Call for Proposals is OPEN!
Rebecca Chambers – @MrsRChambersAnother Year and The Unlearning Continues
Dreams do come true if you persevere, my vision of an experiential passion based classroom have come true.
Introduction to Unlearning June 23 – August 17
Rob Cannone – @mr_robcannoneIf not now, then when?
Designing the Learning Environment : Why students, pedagogy and critical reflection should come first
On cultivating curiosity in the classroom
Robert Hunking – @yesknownoWhen The Dust Settles?
Rola Tibshirani – @rolatHow To Self Engineer A Learning Community?
When Students Shine!
Rolland Chidiac – @rchidsEsports with Primary Students – Part 1: Jumping In
Esports in Primary – Part 2: Next Steps
Ruthie Sloan – @RoosloanSecret Truths of Empathy While Learning to Advocate
Context is Key
Sarah Lalonde -@sarahlalondeeThirty one days – my social media detox
Sean Monteith – @KPDSB_SchoolsA New Year, Perspective From Experience
It’s “Time”
Sheila Stewart – @sheilaspeakingMinding the Children
Chocolate by Trial and Error
Good Tree Stories
Web Intentions
Shelly Vohra – @raspberryberet3Inquiry, Social Justice, & the SDGs
Digital Breakouts Using Google Forms
ETFO Innovate 2019
Shyama Sunder – @ssunderaswaraFinal Thoughts
STAO Blog – @staoapsoExperiment of The Week – Homemade Projector by Steve Spangler
KEEPING BIRDS SAFE INQUIRY – GRADE 1
5 Things That Make You a Mosquito Magnet – YouTube
Stepan Pruchnicky – @stepanpruchReader’s Theatre = Experiential Learning
Canada’s New Food Guide
Sue Bruyns – @sbruynsHere’s to Paving New Ground
Adjust the Tuning
Proofreader or Instructional Leader?
Cultivating the Culture Code
Sue Dunlop – @Dunlop_SueWhy Summer is a Perfect Time for Reflection
Are You Caught in the Whirlwind?
Just Stop Using “You Guys”
T.J. Hoogsteen – @marexdad21st Century Skills: What Students Need Now or Just More of the Same Bad Ideas?
TDSB Professional Library – @ProfLibraryTDSBNew books: take an eReading March break!
National Indigenous Peoples Day – June 21
Terry Greene – @greeneterrySo Long and Thanks For All of This
The Open Learner Patchbook Went To The PressEd Conference
Hatching a PLN
Reset, Reboot, RemOOC
Thanks Milan – Lessons Learned at #OEGlobal19
Feeling the Ground by Getting Some Air
What’s With All The Sharing?
Dreaming is Free
Where am I in the #ExtendmOOC Conversation?
A New Year, A New Semester
TESLOntario Blog – @TESLontarioWHO HAS THE FINAL SAY ABOUT STUDENT MARKS?
ENCOURAGING REFLECTIVE PRACTICE FOR OURSELVES AND OUR STUDENTS
TESOL’S ELECTRONIC VILLAGE ONLINE
The Beast – @thebeasteduA Guy Walks into a Bar
I Am Right Here
Keys to a Rocket Ship
Recess is as Real Life as it Gets
The Merit Centre – @self_regWords Matter. But Sometimes the Interbrain Matters More.
Tim King – @mechsympStretched Thin
There is no STEM
Good Will: it’s what holds the education system together
Tim King – @tk1ngPrivilege Masquerading as Superiority
Class Caps are a Low Resolution Solution to a High Resolution Problem
Cyber Dissonance: The Struggle for Access, Privacy & Control in our Networked World
2019-20: Persistence and Possibility
Easy Money
Elearning: How to make the inevitable more than a cash grab
Tina Zita – @tina_zitaA Journey with Sketchnotes
Saying Goodbye – A Consistent Journey
A Modern ‘Who Came First’ Debate
Will Gourley – @WillGourleyShoulders of giants
Undercover Boss
Beyond
Be Strong in the Face of Poor Government
Back in the day was better (because now is often unbearable)
The best present is one you can give year round
Zelia Tavares‏ – @zeliamctSkype-A-Thon 2019
EdTechTeam Ontario Summit 2019
Hack the Classroom 2018

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


I just got back from walking the dog and my fingers are frozen. It’s so windy and I didn’t wear heavy enough gloves. But, I guess I can’t complain too much. Last night Lisa Corbett, Beth Lyons, and I exchanged screen captures of local temperatures. I guess we’re just balmy and I’m a wimp.

So, this Friday before the Holiday Break, how about treating yourself to some great blog writing from Ontario Educators?


Skype-A-Thon 2019

Maybe it’s just the circles I run in, but I haven’t read or heard much about Mystery Skypes for a while. It seems like not so long ago, it was the hottest thing in the classroom. Maybe people have abandoned the concept for Flipgrid?

So, it was interesting to read Zélia Tavares’ post about her class’ participation in a Skype-a-Thon event.

Students are inspired by experts as their share words of wisdom and students reflect on comments which they have found very inspiring when recommended to find their own networks and supports around the world to lift themselves and others up.

Imagine having the opportunity to talk with a Vice President of Microsoft! Wow.

Look for links in the post to skypeintheclassroom.com and skypeascientist.com.

This could be the tip of the iceberg. If you could have anyone Skype into your classroom for a visit, who would it be? Often, all you have to do is ask. I remember coming in via remote to a Leslie Boerkamp class.


The Grade 3 ‘Travelling Genius Bar’

From Jay Dubois’ recent blog post, a new word for me …

ADE-worthy

The ADE program has been around for a number of years so I imagine that it is indeed difficult to come up with a new project and description that would stand out from what’s already been done.

1:1 iPad Classroom? Been there, done that, kids got t-shirts

But Jay puts a worthy twist to the concept. His students become geniuses and take their expertise on the road to any class in the rest of the school that wants a piece of the iPad action.

Now that’s unique and interesting. There’s a video of the process in the blog post stored on Google Drive. I hope that doesn’t cause problems.


Reconnecting with my cultural roots

I still have to copy/paste Diana Maliszewski’s name when I make reference to her in a post! Sorry, Diana.

Diana really does get this open stuff though and there doesn’t come a post from her that I don’t learn something new. In this case, it’s sharing that part of her heritage comes from Guyana and the West Indies. I had no idea.

She’s fortunate to still have her parents as part of her life and Diana shares a story about making garlic pork. Now, by themselves, they can be two of my favourite foods and I suspect that all sausage comes flavoured with garlic. But, I’ll confess that I’ve never had the need to drink gin out of necessity. Barring access to Diana’s intellectual property, I checked out the recipe online.

http://www.caribbeanchoice.com/recipes/recipe.asp?recipe=318

Let stand for 1-4 days? Hmmm.

The second part of her heritage moment involves going to a charity luncheon. I can understand myself being intimidated by a new group but never thought that the Diana I know would! So, I found that interesting.

Kudos to Diana for making the effort to remain connected to her heritage and her parents at this time of the year.


Naming and Shaming

Just this week, we’ve seen the incident south of the border as a consequence for a politician and Paul McGuire does make reference to that.

This is really something terrible to watch. House Republican leaders are actually saying what Donald Trump does in his attempts to bribe the leader of Ukraine is OK because, well, he didn’t go through with it. He got caught, so no bribe happened.

The bulk of this post though, is focused on the formal naming and shaming done by the Minister of Education. Has this become the way of politics now? Instead of civil discourse, we just ignore facts and shoot from the hip? As Paul notes, many of the big claims, i.e. eLearning for everyone, have been been refuted.

When your minister knowingly doesn’t tell the truth. When he tries to use old-style bully techniques, when he apes the tactics of Republicans south of the border we have to realize that we are playing by a different set of rules.

I hope that the statements and posturizing are for the news media and that common sense prevails in negotiations.


Thanks Milan – Lessons Learned at #OEGlobal19

What an opportunity for Terry Greene. He got to attend the Open Education Global Conference in Milan.

In this post, he offers 10 lessons.

#1 is great – take a chance and maybe it will work out.

#7 what an incredible looking lecture hall

#8 and warning, this can be a time suck but a time suck in a good way

and finally

#6 is something that we’ve learned from international hockey friendship trips. Other people love Canadian stuff. I find that demonstrating Canadian currency is always a crowd pleaser.

All 10 are great to read, muse about, and make sure that you follow the links.


voicEd Radio

The podcast version of our live TWIOE show featuring these posts is available:

https://www.spreaker.com/episode/20854909

Bonus Coverage

The risk of digital leadership

I like the message that’s explicitly stated in this post from Jennifer Casa-Todd. The post revolves around a bullying situation and she pulls out all the tried and true tools as recommendations for how to handle things.

I think, though, that there is another message that comes across in the suggestions that Jennifer offers. All of them are good but the message that I heard was try this, try that, try this, and don’t give up. Somewhere there is a solution.

And, if you don’t have the correct answer, do what the parent did. Turn to someone with more experience – in this case it was Jennifer. And, if you’re that “Jennifer” and you don’t have all the answers, don’t be hesitant to ask others.

Together we’re better.


An Interview with Leigh Cassell

And, in case you missed it, yesterday I posted an interview with Leigh Cassell. If you don’t know of Leigh, you may know of the Digital Human Library.

Leigh was good enough to take the time to answer a few of my questions for the interview. I learned more about this amazing person and the projects that she has her finger on. Give it a read and I’m sure that you’ll learn more and will be inspired.


I know that it’s a Friday and everyone is ready to recharge over the next little bit. I’d like to take the opportunity to wish you a safe and relaxing holidays. It’s my intention to keep learning and blogging but there might be a day or two break in there somewhere.

The podcast This Week in Ontario Edublogs won’t be recorded next week. After all, Wednesday is Christmas Day and Stephen and I have family. Look for something special in the following week though. Keep blogging yourself and let me know what you’re writing.

Make sure that you’re following these great Ontario Edubloggers.

  • @zeliamct
  • @Jay__Dubois
  • @MzMollyTL
  • @mcguirp
  • @greeneterry
  • @jcasatodd
  • @dHL_edu
  • @LeighCassell

This post comes from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.