This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Welcome to another Friday and countdown to the early spring predicted by Wiarton Willie. Enjoy some great blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers as you count.


Gearing Up for MST with a Master Storyteller

In these COVID days, you would understand how someone might lose their enthusiasm for doing extraordinary things. That’s anything but the case for Noa Daniels and this post shows just what extraordinary might look like.

She and her grade 8 students have partnered with Lucky Budd about storytelling. This is kind of amazing to think that this would happen but why not.

In the post, Noa describes everything and it sounds pretty awesome. It’s also not the sort of one of that’s done over a weekend. You’ll have to read to get the complete details.

Her students are also appreciative about what’s going on. Here’s a sampling of the comments from students

  • I thought it was cool how the story connected with the 3 rivers in BC: the Skeena, the Nass, and the Stikine
  • I found it very interesting and I really liked how you paused during the story to add suspense. Thank you for taking the time to share your experience and telling us about how you got into storytelling.
  • I think it’s very inspiring that although the first time you tried to publish a book it didn’t happen but that didn’t stop you from trying.
  • I also really liked the suspense and sound effects you added when you were telling the story. It was really fun listening and you have such a cool vibe!

The complete story is in her post which makes it well worth the read.


I Want to Break Free!

Here’s a sentiment from Richard Erdmann that we all want to experience. Even the notion of going mall walking which, quite honestly, I never particularly care for takes on new importance simply be the fact that we are prohibited from doing it. In my case, I actually miss shopping with my wife who actually touches everything that she might be interested in purchasing. It drives me crazy. When we get the chance to do it again, I think I’m going to have a different outlook.

Cabin fever and stir crazy are two things that I can definitely related to. These days, the highlight is going outside to walk the dog which fortunately is still ok within the rules.

Richard’s situation is a lot more serious and his notion that he is not only missing the experiences but that he’s being robbed of them will give you pause and a chance to empathise.

I don’t know what else to say, Richard, other than to agree with you that we will eventually get through this. Let’s hope that it’s soon. Numbers across the province continue to show promise.


Stress and The Evolving Teenaged Brain: A Study in Contrasts

From the self regulation blog comes an interesting post from John Hoffman. Regular readers here will recall a post I made last week about a group of teenagers who felt robbed that they were not able to get their driver’s licenses.

I remember thinking, at the time, that their logic wasn’t rational – everyone is paying the price during the lockdown. Maybe now I can cut a little slack when, according to John, their rational mind isn’t fully matured until age 25.

But he notes the research that indicates that the teenage mind is specially vulnerable to excess stress. If what we’re living through doesn’t meet that criteria, I don’t know what would.

All this leads to the announcement of an upcoming course specially for this age group through the Merit Centre – Feeling Stress: A Self-Reg Mini-Course for Teens.


What I’ve learned from being a Virtual Teacher so far

I’m hoping that Amy Bowker’s “so far” doesn’t extend too much further and that any more learning comes from reflection.

She does a really good job of identifying her thoughts and feelings about teaching during these times. It’s sad but predictable that students are just plain disappearing by turning off camera or microphones or just not showing up. I can’t imagine the stress on the teacher who needs to mediate those actions.

As I read through Amy’s post, the word “communication” kept popping up. It lies in the answer to so many things that she addresses. Social cues, working with parents, retention and engagement all can be addressed with effective and ongoing communication.

All of it seems so simple until you realize that a teacher doesn’t have all the tools available that she would have in a face to face classroom.

Regardless, there are powerful observations in her post with lots of ideas and a plan for the future.


Per / Con / In / Re – form

Another great post comes from Will Gourley on the Heart and Art Blog. I can’t help but think immediately – are there any other words that end in “form”?

In the post, Will shares his observations on each of these. Each of these words take on a paragraph and you feel the weight of each of these on him personally. In football terms, I would call it “piling on”.

There’s real wisdom is this quote. Pause and think about your own reality as you read this.

I worry that too much emphasis has been placed on performance and conformity without serious consideration to being fully informed of the true social, emotional, and physical costs of virtual learning. 

I can’t help but think that the emphasis part is easy because it can be summarized with a visual checklist. The other part is so difficult to understand and address. Yet, it’s so important.

Thanks, Will, for summarising these “forms” so nicely.


Why Code Illusions?

It’s a question asked of Peter Skillen as a lead in to this activity.

My response is “Why not code illusions?”

If we believe in the power of programming, then we should never question a good premise for a programmed solution.

In this case, Peter introduces us to a nice visualization of an optical illusion that I’m sure you’ve seen many times. You may actually have created the illusion yourself. You may have pulled out a ruler to prove that it is indeed an illusion.

Peter doesn’t provide a solution but it’s relatively easy to program, especially if you take a good look and analysis of the animation that he provides. Of course, I’m not going to include it here; you’ll have to visit Peter’s post to see it for yourself.


Sick Days for All

From Deborah Weston, a bit of a sobering post dealing with sick days. Much has been said about sick days for teachers, particularly how they don’t take them since it’s more work to prepare lessons for someone else than to drag yourself in to work.

We see the messages everywhere these days.

If you have a fever, shortage of breath, or a temperature, please do not enter.

Advice about this also applies to the workplace.

If your collective agreement has provision for sick days of some sort, it makes staying at home easier.

But that doesn’t apply to all. Deborah has done incredible research on this topic and pulls back the curtain to reveal the impact of no sick days.

  • Put Workers at Risk
  • Spread of Illness to Communities and Workplaces
  • Impacts Parents and Guardians
  • Women Face Labour Inequity
  • and more

She fleshes out each of these and ends the post with a true call to action to her readers.

Devote some time to this and you’ll find another counter to the simple statement “We’re all in this together”. Really?


These are terrific and thoughtful blog posts. Please take the time to click through and read them all. Then, follow these bloggers on Twitter. (and follow their blogs too!)

  • Noa Daniels – @noasbobs
  • Richard Erdmann – @rerdmann
  • John Hoffman – @UncommonJohn
  • Amy Bowker – @amyebowker
  • W!ll Gourley – @WillGourley
  • Peter Skillen – @peterskillen
  • Deborah Weston – @DPAWestonPhD

The Year in Ontario Edublogs


As we wrap up and stick at fork in 2020, there are lots of places that are providing their highlights of the year. I’m going to be able to do that this year.

Because of COVID – how sad is that?

Earlier this year, I sat down and created a spreadsheet itemizing all of the blog posts that I had included in my Friday “This Week in Ontario Edublogs” post and also for the voicEd Radio show. I guess this is my signature post; I do it every Friday and feature some great content from Ontario Edubloggers. I’ve written a blog post with the title “This Week in Ontario Edublogs” or “The Week in Ontario Edublogs” 445 times. I do make mistakes.

I started blogging in 2007 and have been at it since then. I even have the book on it written by Will Richardson called “Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms.” So, don’t let anyone tell you that this is a new concept!

My worry, at the time, was there were lots of people all excited about the concepts and digital messages and were sharing stuff to their Personal Learning Network. That’s certainly a great concept and most definitely still worthwhile but everyone was all over American blog posts. There just had to be worthy Canadian content and even more specifically, Ontario content. I was now on a mission. As I would discover Ontario blogs, I started to accumulate them in one spot, this Livebinder.

I’ve actually collected lots of Ontario blogs. Like many things on the web, there comes a time when people move on but I decided to maintain the list just because the blog might return and the original content was just that good.

Certainly, I don’t have time to wade through all of these every week. At one point, I had put the posts into Google Reader which has since gone away. I now maintain a resource stored in The Old Reader so that I’m notified when the RSS spots a new post.

About four years ago, Stephen Hurley extended me an invitation to do a show on voicEd Radio. Unlike traditional podcasts, we would do this show live on Wednesday mornings with the show being recorded and available later as a podcast. We still do that! I write the show overview and share it with him in advance so that he can do some reading. When we have guest hosts like we do in the summer, they get added to the document as well so they know what we’re talking about!

A typical share looks like this one I did for a fun blog post from Terry Greene.

Just enough information to jog my memory but not enough that the talk becomes scripted.

The data from blog posts that are used either on the show or on my Friday blog posts gets entered into the spreadsheet. A typical weekly entry would look like this:

Just check out the titles of those blog posts. Ontario Edubloggers are absolutely the best. There’s always inspiration there and the content never fails to get me thinking. And, after all, that’s one of the reasons why you blog in the first place.

The first five entries would be used for the radio show and the last two which I call “Bonus” in my notes are exclusive to this blog. You’ll see that each author name is actually a link which opens a new sheet in the spreadsheet devoted to that person. Then, there’s the blog post title, the number of times I’d used that particular blog author last year and then a link to the actual TWIOE post. (I had a lot of time at the keyboard during being locked down…)

From my perspective, all this data collection is interesting and lets me make sure that I’m bringing in new voices all the time. It also let my create another new sheet where I could do some statistics and come up with my personal “Top 10 of 2020” list. It’s purely quantitative.

So, here’s my Top 10 List For 2020.

  1. With 15 hits, we have a tie,
    Aviva Dunsiger – @avivaloca – https://adunsiger.com
    Diana Maliszewski – @mzmollytl – https://mondaymollymusings.blogspot.ca
  2. Used 13 times,
    Beth Lyons – @MrsLyonsLibrary – https://thelibrariansjourney.blogspot.com
  3. At 12 hits and two blogs,
    Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261 – https://mrscorbettsclass.wordpress.comhttps://alotalot.wordpress.com
  4. A three-way tie at 11 hits,
    Deborah Weston – @DPAWestonPhD – http://heartandart.ca
    Tim King – @tk1ng with two blogs – https://temkblog.blogspot.cahttp://mechanicalsympathy.ca/wp/
    Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorris – http://www.matthewrmorris.com
  5. And, another three-way tie at 9 hits,
    Jennifer Casa-Todd – @jcasatodd – http://jcasatodd.com
    Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadio – https://reflectingonrecreation.wordpress.com/
    Will Gourley – @WillGourley – http://heartandart.ca

For the record and grand total, 349 blog posts made their way into a Friday TWIOE blog post.

As posts are used on the radio show, I add them to my public voicEd Radio Blog Roll. I feel so honoured that I’ve actually had the opportunity to meet some of these people in person – typically at a professional learning event. Will and I even held a wall up at the back of an auditorium!

I’m so appreciative to all the Ontario Edubloggers that give me raison d’être on Thursdays so that the post can be written and appear on Fridays.

I’m happy to indicate that the voicEd show and the TWIOE post will continue into 2021. I’ve created a new draft document and it’s ready to go (2020 had 114 pages to it and takes forever to load, even with high speed internet).

Now, I’m not naïve enough to think that I’ve got all the Ontario Educational Blog posts corraled. If you’re a blogger and I don’t know about you and your blog, please complete the form you’ll find here. I’m looking for a bit of information like your Twitter handle and link to your blog post. I’d really like to be able to add you to the collection.

In the meantime, I wish everyone a Happy New Year and a prosperous and safe 2021. Look for the radio show and Friday blog post to pick up again next week.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


The voicEd Radio show is always fun to do and it keeps me out of trouble for an hour on Wednesday morning. It’s even more special with guest hosts. This week Paul McGuire joined Stephen Hurley and me for the show. If you missed it, all the shows are archived here – https://voiced.ca/project/this-week-in-ontario-edublogs/


Looking Catholic Education in the Face in Ontario

I remember that one of the arguments against full funding was that it would promote one state sponsored religion and their values and teachings against all others.

In this post, Paul McGuire takes on the issues surrounding a comment from a school board trustee and the breaking of the district’s code of conduct. Paul takes a look at the issue and the influences in and out of education.

Most importantly, he applauds the efforts of teacher Paolo De Buono for speaking his mind and keeping the issue up front in the eyes of those who follow him on social media.

The ultimate decision about this one individual trustee will happen at the next set of elections and it will be interesting to follow.


Brutalist worksheets

Writing on the ETFO Heart and Art Blog, Will Gourley shares his thoughts about the use of worksheets in the classroom. Along the way, he uses the term “brutalist” to further his thoughts.

In this day and age with a mixture of modes of education, I can see where a worksheet solves a number of issues and could be seen as an attempt to level the play ground. I know that many schools have now implemented a quota system on the school photocopier, sadly for financial rather than pedagogical reasons!

It’s sad to see so many “21st Century Educators” turning to Google Docs as a replacement for the paper worksheet. Going digital should always add value to the process and is not just an opportunity to replicate bad practice in a digital form.

In the post, Will shares a number of resources that could be used instead and they are digital. Paul recommended Discovery Education resources during the show. While we were live, Will sent me a message indicating that he had omitted TVO in his collection and that he would add it in. A quick check indicates that he was true to his word.


SOCIAL PRESENCE IN ONLINE LEARNING

Writing on the TESL Ontario blog was a new blogger to me – Jennifer Allore and I hope that I’ve managed to track down her social media account for later on in the post.

We know that teaching online or hybrid is a real challenge and people are doing their best to use the tools that are available to them. Sadly, many districts are just saying “here’s a link – good luck” without any professional learning to go along with it.

There are many tools and Jennifer shares some great advice with the following:

  • Video
  • Personal 
  • Discussion Board
  • Feedback

The one area that it seems to me that would be a challenge in the ESL classroom is the conversations that are a part of the normal routine. Can a Zoom session lead to the same results?


What Is Our Responsibility?

For those who aren’t in an Early Years’ classroom, I suspect that it can be a challenge to read content into the sort of play that might be seen on a cursory glance. Fortunately, we have Aviva Dunsiger digging deeply about the concept.

A student wanted a repeat of a Box City project. I’m impressed that this second year kindergarten remembered the fun from a year ago!

Along the way, Aviva shares that they got into a number of pretty important topics.

  • Gender,
  • Racism,
  • Bullying,
  • #BlackLivesMatter

Those are important topics at every grade. Why not here.

I’m be remiss if I didn’t mention the number of pictures that Aviva shares and the way that she does. It’s well done – show the activity and not the faces…


Designing school when students have the Teacher’s Copy

Boy, did I enjoy this post from Dave Cormier. We know that we all live in different times.

When I read the title of Dave’s post, I thought immediately about university life. Some professors had put previous exams in the library so that we could check out what their exams look like. Others refused to do so indicating that they’d have to come up with a new exam if they did that!

Dave addresses the current reality and information scarcity versus information abundance. If you don’t understand information abundance, it’s time for a Google workshop.

So, what is the goal of university? Is it just to go and learn stuff well enough to be able to play it back? Or, is it a place to learn and apply stuff? If it’s the former, then everyone should be able to thrive by staying home. Of course, surveillance tools will be required to ensure that you’re not cheating on exams.

If it’s the latter, it’s a game changer for many – students, universities, professors – and that leads to a great deal of questions which Dave closes his post with.


Math Links for Week Ending Dec 4th, 2020

David Petro is always good for some interesting things to do with mathematics and this collection does disappoint.

I spent a great deal of time poking around with

Desmos colours

I’m intrigued by this upcoming webinar about snowflakes and symmetry.


Getting High

No, Peter Cameron is not talking about the opening of a cannabis story.

He’s after:

  • Moving.
  • Outside.
  • Breathing.
  • Being in the moment.

He and his family are finding it very close to his home. It’s their current “high” and it sounds like they’re really taking advantage of it.

In these COVID days, I’m reading more and more about classes taking advantage of getting outside for periods of time. This post reminds me that there is a huge advantage just being mindful while doing it.


There’s your collection of great posts from Ontario Edubloggers. Take a few moments and click through to enjoy each of these terrific posts.

Then, follow these bloggers (and their blogs) on Twitter:

  • Paul McGuire – @mcguirp
  • Will Gourley – @WillGourley
  • Jennifer Allore – @jen_allore
  • Aviva Dunsiger – @avivaloca
  • Dave Cormier – @davecormier
  • David Petro – @davidpetro314
  • Peter Cameron – @petectweets

This post originated at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Welcome to another Friday and a chance to take a look at some great blog posts from Ontario Edubloggers. As always, you won’t be disappointed with this great content.


#girlswhogame – Part 2

From Roland Chidiac, this is a followup to his Part 1 blog post from a few weeks ago. Read the blog post and you’ll see where Roland and the #girlswhogame are heading now in their learning.

Spoiler – Minecraft

Unlike games of old that are often first person shooter types, the gaming in this classroom includes work with:

  • solve problems using an inquiry process
  • think of and express questions in order to generate novel ideas
  • think about their thinking and have a growth mindset
  • participate in team work
  • communicate effectively in a variety of ways
  • understand how they are globally interconnected

Of course, all of these concepts are fleshed out in the post and it comes complete with pictures so that you can get a sense of what it looks like in Mr. Chidiac’s classroom.


Friday Two Cents: Society Cannot Function Without Women

Paul Gauchi shares with us some observations from his recent tour of occasional teaching. He’s noting that many of the teachers he’s working with are female.

In a discussion, as I’m sure happens in all schools, the reclosing of the school buildings is a topic.

Paul offers two reasons why he thinks it won’t happen.

First, he shares his thoughts that the politicians view schools as daycare. Secondly, he wonders about teaching positions being undervalued and expands the list to include a number of positions that are traditionally held by women.

He then takes a turn and offers a solution that might help the cause. As a father of two daughters, I didn’t find it a particularly easy post to read.


No Longer School Online

Regular readers will know that I really appreciate a good reflective post and Terry Whitmell looks at the first part of the school year and the successes that her school had with online instruction.

  • Teacher Networking
  • Student Agency
  • Consistency
  • Tools
  • Efficiency
  • Organization
  • Professional Learning
  • Student-Student Connection
  • Success

In the voicEd Radio show, I took a bit of liberty with Terry’s post and used the work Efficacy instead of Efficiency. I really liked her observations about how students took control of their educational lives. In a normal school setting, the structure is imposed on students but she observed their taking control of things. That seems to me to be one of the most important things from this post.

The post is written from the perspective of an administrator. I’d love to know if the teachers at the school observed the same things.


Step Down #SOL2020

Melanie White had me a bit emotional as I read this post. It was difficult to read because she uses “step down” as a delimiter throughout the post. It really was effective as it made me slow down and really mull over her thoughts.

Her thoughts took me through a sense of loneliness as she walks through her school describing what she sees. It reminded me of my own secondary school where we had an old part and a new part. The new part probably could have been a school anywhere in the province but the old part was really unique and yet, at the same time, similar to the building that Melanie describes.

I know that I’ve mentioned it before but her writing can be so moving and she’s done it again.

Then, the bottom fell out when she describes an airless room with Grade 9 students and her efforts to change that. While only a few people could have written something this emotional, I would bet that the emotions and the imagery she uses could be the words of so many others.


Social Distance Games & Activities

The day before I read this post from Larissa Aradj, I’d driven by French Catholic elementary school and students were outside.

Normally, that’s nothing to take note of but the ground was wet and it was the activity that the students were doing that caught my attention. They were lined up, physically distanced of course, and they were doing pushups as the teacher walked along in front of them. I was witnessing a Physical Education activity.

That took me back to my football coaching days!

This year, Larissa has picked up classes of Physical Education herself. It seems to me that that really is a challenging assignment these days. In the good old days, you’d have soccer balls and other tools of the game trade. These are not allowed these days so innovative ways to keep students engaged must be found. In this post, Larissa shares some ideas and links to professionally created activities. It’s a good collection to pass along to colleagues. Thanks, Larissa.

Hey, how about burpees?


Changing the narrative

I found this an interesting discussion from Alanna King. And she’s right; every curriculum document and course of study is presented chronologically.

My “yah, but” came from Computer Science where you build capacity in that matter; it you jump ahead, you overlook key concepts. I mean, what Computer Science teacher hasn’t had to stop in the middle of a lesson to explain something that was not apparent to be missing when you started.

Alanna’s talking more about the big picture in the humanities and that got her thinking about educational structure.

Good questions.

(Alanna, I felt badly that I started at the top of your list and read down)


Creating Engaging Lessons with EdPuzzle – E029

From the Edugals blog, a link to their podcast and the notes to go along with it. The topic this time around was EdPuzzle.

Reading this made me feel old!

EdPuzzle is a tool and a technique for helping students understand the content of a video and you’re probably thinking YouTube. I read an article recently that children put more credibility behind something from YouTube rather than something teacher created. When you think about it, it makes sense.

I actually was “formally” taught about how to use video in the classroom and the lesson went far beyond the play button. It involved noting the timer, having a sheet of questions, and most importantly a remote control. So teacher centred!

In the post, the ladies take you through the process as a teacher and a students and offer some sample codes so that you can experience what they’ve been working with.


There’s lots of great content yet again this week that will inspire you and help you take your game to the next level. Please take the time to click through and read all of these wonderful posts.

Then, make sure you’re following these bloggers on Twitter.

  • Rolland Chidiac – @rchids
  • Paul Gauchi – @PCMalteseFalcon
  • Terry Whitmell – @TerryWhitmell
  • Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadio
  • Larissa Aradj – @MrsGeekChic
  • Alanna King – @banana29
  • EduGals – @EduGals

This post comes from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Let me tell you about dedication. After a stretch of cold weather, it’s been incredible around here. Today, I took a drive to Belle River and the marina on Lake St. Clair. I just sat there enjoying the warm and the lake and watching the people fishing. If it wasn’t for the need to get home and write this blog post, I could have stayed there overnight! But, back to work. Here’s some great content from Ontario Edubloggers.


L’aigle et le corbeau

I learned a great deal from this post from Joel McLean. Originally written in French, I let Google Chrome translate it for me. In the process, the word “corbeau“was translated both to raven and crow. Not to point fingers at Google Translate solely, Bing Translate did the same thing. Joel jumped in for clarification later in the day.

Back to the post, the other thing that I learned was that a raven is the only bird that will attack an eagle. How does the eagle handle it? You’ll have to read Joel’s post.

Above the walk through nature, Joel challenges you to think about the ravens that are on your back and attacking. How do you handle them? What are your ravens? Why are you wasting your time with the ravens?


A Cure for Double Doubling

Tim King thinks that maybe the implementation of the Quadmester might be unique to his district. I can tell you that it isn’t; I know of a number of districts that have also taken this route.

At this point, I have yet to see any educators that affirm that this is a good idea. Instead, a whole course is compressed to fit into a longer period during the day and a shorter course length. The net result is huge pressure on both students and teachers and real concerns that the content won’t be adequately learned.

In secondary schools, there are a number of courses that require specialized instructors. If you follow Tim, you know that he’s one of them. In a perfect world, there is contractual language that talks about class sizes. Have the rules changed in the time of COVID?

Tim offers his analysis of both of these topics and offers ways for it to be resolved. That may well make things even more difficult for a district to implement so I hope that Tim isn’t holding his breath.


Learner Variability

Lynn Thomas uses this blog post to describe her walkthrough of the Learner Variability Navigator. Based on solid pedagogy, this appears to be a complete resource for educators dealing with today’s students.

As Lynn notes, these students show up for school with a lot of baggage.

  • Poverty​
  • Learning to speak English ​
  • Lacking background knowledge​
  • Boredom and disengagement​
  • Trauma​
  • Color, ethnicity, or gender making you susceptible to stereotype threat​
  • Working memory, decoding, or attention challenges ​
  • Devastated socially and emotionally in school​

Dealing with language and mathematics, this is a one stop place to embrace and understand so much. Set aside a bunch of time to work your way through this.

Again, language and mathematics are the target for this research but I could see how the elements could play out in other disciplines.


#girlswhogame – Part 1

Rolland Chidiac is back and describes a wonderful opportunities for the girls in his 5 / 6 class.

With the onset of COVID, it kind of looked like it might not happen and yet, it did. Kudos for all who pull that together.

The “game” is Minecraft and the girls have the change to work with Brenda Sherry and Rolland’s Vice-Principal Sherry as mentors. With the connection through Katina Papulkas at Dell, they’re involved with Dell’s “Girls who game” initiative. Gaming?

Exciting times are ahead as the girls discover more about gaming using Minecraft as well as the Global Competencies, STEM, and future career paths that may be of interest to them.


A good Canadian Maple

If you think that sounds much like “a robust, full-bodied red wine”, you’re pretty close to the content of this post from Sheila Stewart!

She’s been on fire writing blog posts as of late but I ended up intrigued with this one. I’ve definitely heard of Bailey’s Irish Cream but Sheila had the opportunity to experience Cabot Trail Maple Cream, another liqueur. Just reading her post and the experiments that she’s had with it make me want to brush my teeth!

Our favourite warmup for the winter months is a mulled wine – easily made with a non-descript red wine, cloves, and cinnamon sticks. That’s our comfort drink, Sheila.

I will have to keep my eye out for her recommendation the next time I drop into the LCBO.


In Remembrance: Service, Sacrifice and a Soldier Bear Named Winnie

On the Mathematics Knowledge Network blog, Arielle Figov introduces us to this film featuring “Winnipeg Winnie”.

It comes in time for Remembrance Day and, more than just the movie, includes curriculum resources tied to the Ontario Curriculum.


The 500 – #398 – Eliminator – ZZ Top

Following Marc Hodgkinson’s walk through Rolling Stone’s Top 500 albums has been an awesome experience for me. It also is a reminder of how long ago some of these albums actually are.

This time, it’s ZZ Top’s Eliminator.

If you are in the mood for a trip back to the fusion of blues-rock and synth-pop in 1983, give this record a listen. Better still, click on some of those video links and enjoy the cheesy decadence of a classic ZZ Top video.   

For me, this brought back a smile. I moved to Essex County from an area of Canada with a much more decided Canadian taste. I was always all over them about Canadian versus American spelling. I remember a home room moment with a chat with a student who sat right in front of my teacher’s desk.

Hey, sir! Have you heard the new song from Zed Zed Top?

To his defence, they were bombarded by the Detroit media.

I always wanted a spinning guitar.


Phew! I got the post done in time to watch Thursday night football.

Please take a moment to click through and read these terrific posts. Then, follow them on Twitter.

  • Joel McLean – @jprofnb
  • Tim King – @tk1ng
  • Lynn Thomas – @THOMLYNN101
  • Rolland Chidiac – @rchids
  • Sheila Stewart – @SheilaSpeaking
  • Arielle Figov
  • Marc Hodgkinson – @Mr_H_Teacher

This post appears on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.