This Week in Ontario Edublogs


July kicked off the summer months and This Week in Ontario Edublogs was there to enjoy the day. On the voicEd Radio show, guest Amanda Potts joined Stephen Hurley and me for the hour. You can listen to the show via Podcast here.


Who’s anti-racist?

Our guest Amanda Potts took us through this very personal post. Because of the issues happening in the US and indeed, Canada, at the moment, people are taking the time to write about their feelings and sharing their own view of their personal privilege.

There was an interesting reflection on her view of the difference between n0n-racist and anti-racist and we had a chance to discuss that on the show.

In the post, Amanda shares two wonderful stories and paints a vivid picture in each. One was about a student whose mother kept her at home when she got angry to keep her from getting into trouble. The other story was about accidentally assisting a person who she had cut out of her social media life. Of course, both were learning experiences.

Throw in reference to a couple of podcasts on the topic and it’s quite easy to see that she has done considerable thinking about this.

It’s a long-ish post and very rich in content. I’ve read it a few times now and fine something new each time through.


Slice of Life: Routine

One of the truly remarkable things about being a teacher is that, in a thirty year career, you have 30 different starts and stops to your workflow. I can’t think of any other job that can make that claim.

School is full of routine. We know that students succeed better because of this. And, because teachers are there every minute, they run through the same routine, at least while at work.

I can recall the end of school years gone by. You run for an entire school year living and breathing the routine of daily life. Then, on that last day, it all changes. The school year routine goes away FULL STOP and summer begins. Some people take the first week or so to kick back and relax. I always liked the concept of continuing with the energy and going on a holiday or attend a conference at the first of July.

As we know, this year is different. Lisa Corbett claims that she has a lot to do and shares some of it with us. She admits that, upon proofreading, she found her post “aimless”. As a result of teaching at home, the home part continues, sans students. I hope that her family helps reset her priorities.

 That was what I needed to reset my school brain so I was ready for summer brain. Somehow I need to convince my family to do this on Friday night.

She does call the post “aimless” and I can understand. I also suspect that there are thousands of teachers that are feeling the same way and will need to kick start the summer months differently somehow this year.


Storage War$ Learn at Home Editon

As I was doing the show yesterday, I looked at the title and noticed the spelling mistake. I thought that was odd and that I had typed it incorrectly. But, Larissa Aradj, it was a copy/paste job from your post.

The post is about a terrific classroom activity that uses a Google Slide presentation to provide choices for students to select, based upon what they might find should they beat Brandi and Jarrod to win a locker.

What was unique about this was Larissa didn’t share her original template. Instead, another teacher, Leslie Mott, had taken Larissa’s concept and ran with it and Larissa chose to share Leslie’s idea in her post.

That stuck me as really unique. So many of us create and share concepts on social media. But, do we ever get a chance to share what someone else did with our idea? (Think about it for a second) It seems to me that this is how good ideas become great as a result of community improvement.

There actually was a bit of discussion on Social Media where Leslie identified Larissa as a mentor and a sharer of great ideas. I’ve been in a PD session led by Larissa and completely agree.


The 500 – #419 – “Dummy” – Portishead

I hadn’t heard any Portishead for years until I read this post from Marc Hodgkinson. He’s working his way through a top 500 list and sharing his thinking with us.

It was a great re-listen to me. It seems so long ago.

What’s interesting is how Marc goes through and shares his thinking about the music and ties it to what was happening in his personal life at the time.

And, just like last time I featured one of his posts, I did follow the link to the list of the top 500 to re-discover #1.


COVOID-19 and the Return of the Memory Thief

Well, this has to be one of the more emotional blog posts that I’ve read in a long time. Many of us have dealt with family members struggling with Alzheimer’s Disease. It’s incredibly tough.

As much as I had to deal with it, it pales to the way that Judy Richards is. I had the advantage of being face to face, hand to hand, hug to hug. I can’t imagine the pain of being locked outside looking in at someone who is locked inside dealing with it.

Staff do try to make an effort by doing the communications via iPad thing but assuredly, it’s not the same. That’s even true if both ends of the communications are effective users of the technology.

Fortunately,

There is a brigade of fire fighters caring compassionately for my mom, doing their best to comfort her, and keep her safe. 


PowerAutomate, Forms->Excel
PowerAutomate, Forms->Excel Part 2

The above is actually two posts from Cal Armstrong. I know that it looks a bit messy with the formatting but I don’t want to point to one without pointing to the other.

As I read both posts, I’m impressed with the support that Cal is providing for staff members in this. Lots of details, lots of screen captures. When I worked with a group of CAITs, we did this a lot and called them “One Sheet Wonders”. The rules were to make it clear, make it efficient, but keep it to one sheet of paper so that people are able to easily follow through the concepts.

In this case, Cal is showing readers how to connect resources using Microsoft’s Flow. I like his analogy to IFTTT which has been around and so functional for so many people. The comparison is immediately obvious.

Both examples were really easy to go through. The first one shows how to easily manage Microsoft Social-Emotional Check-In via Forms through to Excel and the second one features how to be smarter than Excel. (Cal’s words)

I know that many people are really handy with Forms. They’re probably equally as handy with Excel. The value from this post comes from showing how to connect the two, making you that much more efficient.


Crazy Hair Day

As a result of the COVID virus and the Learn at Home initiative, a lot of people are thinking about a lot of things that are happening and things that are hard to make happen. In this post, Arianna Lambert thinks about things that maybe shouldn’t be happening at all.

She got me thinking of my own high school. At Grade 12 graduation, I got a School Letter. In Grade 13, I got a Major School Letter. The “Letter” wasn’t actually a letter; it was actually a crest of the school mascot. At the time, the school mascot was a profile view of a character that we wouldn’t even consider these days. The school has since changed its mascot retiring this one. If only professional sports teams would follow the same lead. Getting a letter was important at the time. It was one of those institutional things that the school had always had. I can’t remember the numbers now but if you joined X number of clubs, Y number of sports, or Z number of honours, you got a badge. Get enough badges and you were eligible for a letter.

In her post, Arianna Lambert identifies things that are common to many schools in a way to encourage spirit. She shares a story of a little girl who felt the activity made it hard to participate in. Of course, nobody asks students how they feel about the activity. It is just assumed that what was done in the past is good going forward.

Now on the other side of the desk, she’s asking good questions that the institution and those that support it need to consider and possibly act on. If there is no good and equitable way to make it work for all, why perpetuate it?


I really enjoy sharing my thoughts about the great posting from Ontario Edubloggers. I hope that you can take some time to click through and enjoy the original posts.

Then, follow these great bloggers on Twitter.

  • Amanda Potts – @Ahpotts
  • Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261
  • Larissa Aradj – @MrsGeekChic
  • Marc Hodgkinson – @Mr_H_Teacher
  • Judy Richards – @redknine
  • Cal Armstrong – @sig225
  • Arianna Lambert – @MsALambert

This post originated on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

A couple of visualisations


I’ve shared a couple of COVID-19 website resources over the past little while. The Mathematics Geek in me really appreciates the efforts of other who are tracking the virus and sharing with us.

Today a couple more…

HealthMap

This is another world-wide visualisation. Instead of a snapshot at a particular time, it’s an animation that shows the spread world-wide. By pressing the play button on the bottom left, you can see the spread over time.

I’ve captured the world on February 24, 2020.

Beyond just playing the animation, you can pause the display and use the scrubber bar that appears at the bottom. That lets you view the animation at your speed and also lets you focus on a particular area or country to see where it hit there and how it spread.


Siouxsie Wiles & Toby Morris: What does ‘level two’ mean – and why does it matter?

From New Zealand and released under a Creative Commons license, is a discussion of the “level” system in use there. The details are interesting and also include the visualisation shown below.

It’s a simple demonstration where one person makes contact with just two people. If you’ve ever worked with binary trees, you’ll recognise it immediately. But wait – the second part of the animation shows the impact that an individual making a social connection decision can have on the spread.

For some people, they understand better with a visual approach. Both of these do a terrific job of sending a message.

A second opinion


Earlier, I had shared a resource developed by John Hopkins University to allow internet connected users to track the COVID-19 virus. The post appears here.

The resource lets you check into things with the latest updates added.

Microsoft, through Bing has produced a similar resource. COVID-19 Tracker

As with the John Hopkins University tracker, the data is display in a visual manner on a world map. The size and intensity of the data plotted give you a quick sense as to location and numbers.

Data from the United States can be found by state. The map is zoomable and so you head to the state of interest. Canada’s data is accumulated into a single entry and it’s located in mid-Saskatchewan. You can hover over any identified location for more specific information.

Both resources are good examples as to how powerfully data can be used to illustrate the story behind it.