Never Miss a Formula 1 Race Again


Lately, there’s only been one Formula 1 race in the Eastern Time Zone.  The bulk of the races are in Europe and there is a growing number of races in Asia and then, of course, there’s Australia.

Other than viewing the programming guide, I’ll head over to the Formula 1 website and click on the “Convert To My Local Time” to get the actual starting time of the races.  Confession – I’ll add it to my electronic calendar with a heads-up warning and it works very nicely to make sure that I don’t miss a race live.  Of course, there’s replays but that’s really not the same.

Today, I ran into another wonderful time converter.  We all know (I hope) that you can use Google to convert times in different time zones for you but it’s much more fun to use something else.

If you’re one of them, check out Time Zen.

As with all time zone converters, the actual place you’re looking for may not be available so you have to be close.  In this case, Silverstone isn’t there but Northampton is.  Use the Add/Remove buttons to get the places you need!  The little slider allows you to adjust the times forward and backwards to get just what you want!

Of course, there is an educational use other than the mechanics of Formula 1 racing which is worthwhile in itself.  Suppose you’re doing a real time chat with a classroom from another time zone.  Time Zen has you covered!

That’s probably a better rationale for most people but I am watching qualifying from Silverstone as I write this!

 

OTR Links 06/30/2013


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Hoot Reading


Like many people I suspect, I’m on the search for a good replacement to the Google Reader when it stops operating on Canada Day.  For so long, Google Reader has been my go-to for news reading and I will really miss it.  But it is what it is and we’ll have to change.  I’ve installed Feedly on my computer and I’m actually go to go with that but I got sidetracked.

In my web browser, I have Hootsuite open all the time in a tab.  It may not necessarily be the open tab but it’s there should I have the need to take a look at what’s happening on Twitter.  When I discovered that Hootsuite had made RSS reading available, I had to give it a shot.  My first reaction is very positive.  Rather than having a separate application open for RSS reading, incorporating it into my existing social reading routine makes so much sense.

Here’s how I did it.

First, I had to get my Google Reader data.  It’s a step that everyone should do – you get it by going to Google Takeout and downloading your content.  The nice thing about this is it also lets you take control of your information.  The content comes down as a .zip file which you need to expand.  Inside, you’ll find a few files but the important one for this process is subscriptions.xml.  Got it!

Now, the standard Hootsuite installation doesn’t do the trick.  You need to download the Hootsuite Syndicator.  It’s part of the Hootsuite Hootlet for Google Chrome.  (Try saying that five times)

It installs itself into Hootsuite as an application.  (I already had the Evernote application installed)

Launching the Syndicator for the first time gives you the opportunity to import your subscriptions from your Google Reader.

Or, you could start from scratch/add even more.

Next step is to work with the Subscription Manager to look at your existing subscriptions.

Each blog that you’re monitoring or potentially monitoring has to be selected.  If you have them in groups, add a group or add the individual feeds.  I actually liked this process.  It reminded me of how much I have chosen.  (I did decide to not activate a couple)

And you’re off!  Refresh the column or let Hootsuite do it based upon whatever time interval you have set and the reading resumes…right in your social media browser!

You’ll undoubtedly want to play around with the configuration options to make the installation your own.  What is particularly nice is the age of sharing pops up when you cursor over a story.

Favourite it, share it (Yeah!), mark as read, or mark it to read later.

Clicking an individual story opens a reader…

Story

 

With a hot link to go to the original story in a new tab.  I like this feature.  I don’t tend to sit down and read stories one by one.  I tend to read the title, consider the source, read the snippet and then open the story in a new tab if I want more.  Once I have a bunch of tabs open, only then will I do the complete article reads.

The implementation is quite nice.  There will be critics, I’m sure, that will indicate that it doesn’t have the full set of features previously found in the full blown Google Reader.  Individual users will have to make their own decision but, for me, the fact that it’s just another column in one of my most used applications is really appealing.

OTR Links 06/29/2013


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Yesterday in Ontario MicroBlogging


Normally, on Fridays, I share some of the wonderful Ontario Blogging efforts from the previous week.  I thought I would take a slightly different tact this week.  There have been a lot of “last day(s)” thoughts shared on Twitter on Thursday.  Here’s some of what caught my eye in case you missed them.

I’ve created a Storify of some of them.  I could have kept going and going but I’ll leave that up to you if you wish.

You can follow all of the Ontario Educators on my lists here and here.  It’s so good to see the professionalism of the discussion at the end of a very long and eventful school year.

If you want to be added yourself, visit here and complete the form!

Check out the complete Storify here.

(I think this is a record for the number of heres in a post!)

Storify

 

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Just to finish with a couple of blog references.