This Week in Ontario Edublogs


So, during this morning’s walk Jaimie and I were talking about what content to put into this post.  As always, there’s always some great stuff from Ontario Educators.  Of all the posts that I do, this is far and away the easier one to do.  The only difficult thing is to weed it to keep it down to three-five entries.  (See my TL friends, I do listen and learn your code words.)  As we were walking, he indicated that I’m all about this coding thing so why not highlight some Hour of Code stuff from Ontario people so that teachers have at least a week to plan for something for the Hour of Code, December 8-14.  So now the secret’s out – the brains behind this blog is a 5 year old Shepherd/Husky cross.

Hey, I’m smart AND good looking!

It sounds like a good idea so here goes…

Playing with Programming: Coding for Younger Students

From the Minds on Media event at the recently concluded Bring IT, Together conference, Peter McAsh shares his collection of links and resources for coding in the elementary school.


Hopscotch

I’m a big fan of the Hopscotch programming language if you have access to iPads in your classroom.  This link takes you to my Hopscotch page on my PD Wiki.


Making a palindrome from a user-provided String in Java

It’s hard to convince the non-converted that coding can be fun.  One of the fun problems that has to be part of any program of computer science has to be coding fun with palindromes.  “Able was I ere I saw Elba”.

It’s fun to create palindromes and it’s also fun to input a string to test if the string is indeed a palindrome itself.  It lends itself to a discussion of rules – does capitalization count?  How about punctuation?  Spaces?

True story – I woke up and played this YouTube video from Brandon Grasley this morning.  It’s just plain fun – and a reminder that Hour of Code isn’t limited to the youngest of students.


How to Get Started with Coding in Your Classroom with the Hour of Code

For the unbeliever, this is always the question.  A few others – where do I find the time?  How do I learn this stuff?  Does it fit the regular curriculum?

Scott McKenzie addresses much of this in his post…


Learn to Code – A Hands on Tutorial for Teachers

Maybe coding in the Scratch language is where you want to be with your students.  On Wednesday evening, Brian Aspinall led a unique opportunity in #csk8 to learn a bit about the basics of Scratch and how to develop an application.

The session was captured by hashtag and a Storify document created from it.


Hour of Code 2014

Finally, in case you missed it, I had checked my Hour of Code links from last year, updated them, and added a few more.

In addition to updating the Learning and Pearltree resources used previously, I added a Flipboard and NKWiry version.  If you’re interested in my resources, you only need to check one of them.  They all point to the same resources.  It was just my way to force myself to keep at least a modicum of functionality with these tools.


Jaimie was right.  That was fun and I hope helpful.

Check out all of the Ontario Educators blogging list here.

Maybe I should add these links to a Livebinder for next year….

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OTR Links 11/28/2014


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.