This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Happy Friday and welcome to another sharing of some of my reading from Ontario Edubloggers I did recently.


Clean those boards

From Cal Armstrong, perhaps a Public Service Announcement. As Cal notes in the post, he has a number of whiteboards around the perimeter of his classroom that he uses regularly. His problem? How to clean them.

He indicates that he’s tried:

  • torn up towels
  • athletic socks
  • plastic bags

That’s quite a collection of ideas!

I never had that many whiteboards but I recall a solution, by accident, that worked out well. I had a microfibre wipe for my glasses sitting on the desk and reached out and actually used it once. It did an amazing job. Of course, they don’t come free and I don’t know how long it would work before it would need to be washed. I just threw it in the wash when I got home. And, truth be told, I only had one whiteboard that I was using. I can’t imagine a whole classroom of them.

Any suggestions? Head over to Cal’s blog and help a colleague out.


THE REWARDS OF TEAM TEACHING

From the TESL Ontario blog, a post from Mandeep Somal that I think goes further beyond just the concept of Team Teaching.

I’ll admit; team teaching wasn’t something that I wasn’t able to experience as the only Computer Science teacher in my school. So, I ended up living vicariously through this post.

I think that it’s tough to argue when she outlines how it works…

  • Open communication between teachers – this can consist of daily updates about the class, sharing ideas of what and how to teach, or jointly assessing students’ progress.
  • Efficiency in work – since you know that someone else is depending on you to complete your share of the workload, you become accountable to stay on schedule and get your share done in a timely manner.
  • Greater attention to detail – nobody wants to work with a messy or unorganized teaching partner, thus making you attentive to detail.

My only wonder about this deadlines and holding up your end on things. We all know that things always don’t go as planned when timing it out. Does missing your target cause issues for your partner?

Actually, I have another wonder – read the post and enjoy the philosophy described here – why don’t more people do this?


How to Appreciate Straight Talk

I’ve never met Sue Dunlop; I know her through her writing but if I had to guess, I would have predicted that she was, in fact, a straight shooter.

From this post, it’s not a new thing – she claims to have been this way since she was 18. In the post, she offers a couple of titles to support the notion of proceeding with candor.

In my opinion, it’s most efficient to use straight talk. If you’re honest and truthful, you won’t get caught up in the same discussion at some later date when you have to remember just what it was that you had said if you make it overly flowery or you dance around the issue.

I always appreciated a supervisor who was a straight talker. It was worthwhile knowing her/his position and once you agree on the points, much easier to determine a plan of action.

In a leadership course that I took once, we were encouraged to adopt this type of approach and Sue captures it nicely in the post. The one caution is to make statements on things that are observable and measurable and stay away from things that could be taken as a personal slam to someone.


Friday Two Cents: Being Positive For The New Year

I learned, from this recent post from Paul Gauchi, that he isn’t a contract full-time teacher yet. I guess I considered from the richness of his past posts that he was.

He manages to tie that position into one of not making a resolution for the New Year. No one word here.

Instead, he shares his outlook of positiveness…

  • Have high hopes
  • See the good in bad situations
  • Trust your instincts

The last point is interesting. I wonder – are teacher instincts different from other people’s? Not only do you, as a teacher, act for yourself but you also act and make decisions for students in your charge.

I like this graphic…it says it all.


Words on Fire

I started out reading this post from Sue Bruyns and remember thinking that it was going to be a book report or summary. Of course, it’s from Sue, so I made sure that I read the entire post.

Then, it got real.

But beyond becoming immersed in a world as readers, we also want our students to know the power of creation. We want them to use words, play with words and combine words to create other worlds, to create characters and to create tantalizing images of places that others will want to visit.

That changed the tone just a bit for me. Yes, she was still on about the book but it leads you to realize that reading in education is more than enjoying or understanding a good book. It should move the reader to want to create content on her/his own.

It seems to me that blogging is a great place to start in order to support this.


Snippets #3

Peter Beens is back with a summary and commentary on some of his recent posts. A couple really caught my interest.

Trump Properties

We definitely live in a challenging world and the recent acts and responses should give worldly travellers pause to consider their destination. Maybe it’s because I’m Canadian and some of the passengers on that Ukrainian flight were from the University of Windsor, but I would think carefully about places that I would care to visit.

If You’re an Avro Arrow Fan…

I’m old enough to appreciate the amount of Canadiana that surrounded the Avro. Like Peter, I feel that it’s a part of our history and it’s a good thing that these blueprints weren’t destroyed so that we might all be able to enjoy them. Would history have changed if this project hadn’t been scrapped?


The Memory Thief

This is a story that we’re seeing more and more of and many of us have lived through. It’s not a pleasant thing. In fact, when we were younger, there was so little that we knew about it. We sure know a great deal more today.

In this post, Judy Redknine shares a story of love and caring between her and her mother. She writes in great detail the process that they both have endured and the struggle through dealing with dementia.

Very appropriately, she addresses this illness as a thief stealing parts of a wonderful life.

Stealing is all about vulnerability. My mother is vulnerable. We are all vulnerable. Today her priceless treasures remain locked in a strong box. Her joy, her laughter, her love of nature, of music, of stories, of people, of ice cream, and chocolate. All fiercely protected by the superpower of love; guarded by friends and family. She is full of grace.

It’s a long, detailed read. You can’t help but feel the love and well up with a sense of empathy at the same time.


It’s another Friday of great reads. Please take the time to click through and read all that these bloggers are offerings.

And then, make sure that you’re following them on Twitter.

  • @sig225
  • @TESLontario
  • @dunlop_sue
  • @PCMalteseFalcon
  • @sbruyns
  • @pbeens
  • @redknine

This post appeared on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

News, then and now


Well, the election is now over.  How did things go in your neck of the woods?

We had a change in our Member of Parliament.  We went from Orange to Blue.

Like many Canadians, I suspect, I was channel surfing last night to see the various election coverages.  I lost count of the number of times that the CTV coverage explained the colours on the scoreboard on the bottom of the screen.  I remember thinking that if that had to be explained to you, then maybe you shouldn’t be able to vote.

Digitally, I like to stay on top of the news and last night was no different.  In addition to the television, I had my laptop open monitoring things.  I’ve been playing around with a new news resource, Newsola.  It claims to be based upon NewsMap according to the link in the bottom right corner.  NewsMap relies on Flash but Newsola doesn’t so that was refreshing and it ran it my browser without intervention on my part.

Instead of providing you with one story, Newsola provides you with them all.  Or, at least, what fits on the screen.  Bigger and brighter means more relevancy.  As I sat back to watch things, I knew I was going to write this post so I took a screen capture roughly at 8:00pm.

Of course, the first thing that I did was change the country to Canada and the topic area to National … it would have been tough coverage without that!

Screen Shot 2019-10-21 at 8.11.25 PM

After I captured the screen shot, I clicked on the “Auto refresh” to have the stories refresh themselves without my intervention.

This morning about 8:00am, I reloaded to see the latest.

Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 8.37.35 AM

The news kept flowing nicely which was a nice testament to this product.  For full details about how it works, click on the About link at the top of the screen.

Now, National isn’t the only category that you can select for stories.  If you’re into monitoring, Technology, there’s a button for that.  Just know that the selections are additive so unchecking a category that you don’t want can be really helpful.

 

At what cost?


I read about the announcements from Apple yesterday with interest.  It’s not that I’m sitting on a pot of gold here waiting to buy the latest and shiniest though.  It’s just a chance to see how Apple will push the world forward in technology use and ideas and also a chance to see them catch up with others.

My biggest interest was in what I would call catch up and that was the promised news service.  I admit that I’m a news junky and was really curious.  Off I went to the App Store and I couldn’t find it.  I grabbed my iPad and looked at the store there and nada.

I wasn’t terribly surprised; often it takes a day or two for things to trickle down to we Canadians.  The price of Apple News+ is listed at $9.99/month which, of course, is American dollars.  If you’ve ever downloaded a song for iTunes, you know that it takes a few more pennies Canadian to do the deed.

So, I was going to wait a couple of days but then wondered if I wasn’t missing a web version.  I actually just guessed that it might be at http://news.apple.com and it turned out I was correct.

Click to try and I get this…

AppleNews

I forgot this was Apple.  Every new feature requires a rewrite of the operating system!  Here’s where I stand as I begin to write this post.  2.5 GB to use a new application.  Hopefully, the standard “bug fixes and enhancements” also apply.

download

Even after I download it, and apply the update, there’s no guarantee that it’s going to be available in Canada but I’m 1/2 a gig into it so will finish.

It’s not that I need another news program.  Followers of me know that I’m up early and reading things in Flipboard, News 360, Opera Personal News, and of course, my Old Reader collection.  But still, a new player on the market deserves at least a click or two (and a download).

— a while later —

I’ve rebooted and am back to the news site.  When I click the “Try Apple News+” button, I’m prompted to see if I approve the opening of the application.  I did a quick check and, yes, there is now a News application in my applications folder.

Upon opening, there are a number of default channels – obviously it knows that I’m from Canada and it comes pre-configured for Canadian Politics and NHL Hockey.  How cliche.  No CFL Football?

Ah, but I can search for additional channels or topics.  Of course, I had to add Education and Educational Technology.

Channels

I could add some of my, er, Favourites…

Favourites

And a bit of preferences to change.

newsprefs

It was interesting to poke around.  There is the promised News+ section which will be the paid upgrade.  Disappointingly, for the way I read the news, I couldn’t find a way to share the stories that I’m reading to my social networks.  There is the traditional Apple sharing menu amongst Apple things that are on my computer.

Heading back and poking around, there clearly is a Mac OS and an iOS application.  There’s nothing about the program that runs on the web.  That cuts out much of my reading routine because I’m not always using my MacBook Pro.  Plus, I do like the sharing with others aspect of what I do when I’m reading.  The best I could come up with is to use the “Open with Safari” option (which actually opened my default browser which isn’t Safari) and from there I could share.  It’s just a couple of extra steps.

Navigation was slick; the navigation menu was in a dark mode in the left pane with the content appearing as the publisher intended in the right.

In summary, it is an Apple application and designed to keep you in the Apple environment and not out in the open on the web.  I’ve taken a quick wander around the News+ section.  Given the limitations above, from my perspective, paying for access for stories might well be the saving factor for the program.  So much of the other functionality exists already in other places.

News Junkie


Within the past hour, I have confessed to a friend that I’m a news junkie.  I read and try to understand as much as I can.  Consequently, I’m constantly looking for the best way to read what I want to read.  On my iPad, I have Zite, Flipboard, Pulse News Reader and the LCARS RSS Reader.  (all of which have had previous reviews on this blog!)  On my computer, I’ve experimented with a number of RSS readers and seem to have settled in on Google Reader and Newsquares.  On top of that, I do have the Newseum and a couple of other newspapers all queued up!

I read a number of blogs and some of my favourites, you’ll find on my own blogroll.

 

There’s lots of good reading to be had at all of the above sources.  Still, I search for more efficient ways to stay on top of things.

Normally, anything that I write about on this blog is part of my regular routine and I’ve tried them long enough to have an opinion.  But, given the conversation with @doremigirl tonight, I thought that I’d share a service that I literally signed up for this morning while reading something somewhere else!  It’s called Planetaki.  Their description of their service is:

A planet is a place where you can read all the websites you like in a single page. You decide whether your planet is public or private.

My first reaction was that this service would be a good way to assign reading assignments that involve multiple sources to students.  Just create a “planet” with all of the resources cued up for the students to read.  It probably would serve well in that function.  But then, I started thinking — could I use this to make me a more productive reader for the things that I read every day.

Essentially, when you create a “planet”, you put together websites that you want to read.  Planetaki then assembles the websites into a single reading document.  I would just scroll down the computer reading what I want to read.  It sounds intriguing.  Where to start?

I just happened to be looking at my Blogroll at the time.  Why not start there?  So, I created a “planet”.  I wasn’t alone.  Here are some of the recently created planets…

image

I figured that I better focus on mine.  I already was looking up and down the list eager to check out the other “planets”.  Now, these “planets” can be public or private but it seems to me that the best route would be to go public.  So, you can read my blogroll at http://www.planetaki.com/dougpete.  You can read the list – when I read it, the newest items are highlighted as new since the last reading.

As I’m creating this entry, two of the most recent posts where from Peter Skillen and David Warlick.  Planetaki gives a decent amount of a preview for the post with a link to the original post.  Not bad for a preview.  If an item is newsworthy, then I can click on the keep button where the story is preserved.  Viewing the complete post pulls in all of the artifacts from the original blog so that you can do things like add a comment, digg it, tweet about it, or whatever the author has configured.

image

As I kept checking the resource today, I realized why I have these resources on my blogroll.  They write great content and there were updates during the day.  As I mentioned earlier as well, there are some people with blogrolls that haven’t had a post in three years.    But, I guess it’s important to do some name dropping.

I took a look at it and really like it.  It definitely is sequential but when you bring up the “planet” on the iPad where scrolling is so important, it really performed nicely.  Ditto for the iPod Touch.  It does reaffirm to me that this would be the perfect tool for assigned student reading.  The only real problem that I’ve run into is adding Alfred Thompson’s blog http://blogs.msdn.com/b/alfredth/.  I get him plus a whole bunch of other Microsoft blogs.  They’re actually pretty good reading but not what I had in mind.

For me, I’m going to give it a shot.  I’ve made it a bookmark on my Tizmos page which is my default.  I’m going to give it a shakedown and see if it can’t change my reading lifestyle for the better and make me more productive.

RSS is Boring


Well, maybe I can change your mind about this.  As I was playing around with Google Chrome and trying to work solely in the browser, I started to think about RSS feeds.  It’s yet another way to gather all the news that’s fit to read.  I’ve actually moved away from my computer based RSS Readers in favour of picking up current reads from announcements from Twitter or by reading through Flipboard of Pulse on the iPad.

As I poked around inside Chrome though, I stumbled across a find that’s worthy of keeping and sharing with you.  The application is called NewsSquares.  Like many of the apps that I talked about yesterday, it’s available through the Chrome Store and installable with a click.

In order to use NewsSquares, you need to be logged in to your Google account.  On first launch, if you have items in Google Reader, NewsSquares uses that as a starting point.  Starting point for what?

It’s a little difficult to describe so here’s a visual.

Each of the items appear in your screen as a news square.  In the top right corner, you’ll see a count for unread messages.  In the bottom right corner, an arrow lets you browse through the stories.  The individual stories clips appear in boxes along the bottom of the screen.  You’ll scroll across the bottom with your mouse or trackpad until you find a story of interest.

Each story comes with a time stamp so that you’re not reading ancient history.  Find one that’s of interest to read to access it.

As you would expect with stories, it’s important to share the news and so there are buttons available to share on your favourite services.  Need more than just a clip?  Then, ask NewsSquares to take you to the original so that you can read it all.

On their FAQ, they do respond to the unfair question about being compared to Flipboard or Pulse.  I like the response that this is a project in HTML5 which distinguishes this from the other products.  If you like the Chrome version, you’ll also want to snag the Android version of this product.

If you need more than just what your RSS provides, you can search for and/or add your own content to feed the reader.  Configuration items include colours and frequency of updates.  I think that this is a real find and well worth the time to click once and get if you’re a fan of RSS.

A Tale of Two Newspapers


A few months ago, paper.li hit the internet by storm.  Paper.li is a free service that creates an online newspaper packed with content that is provided by your followers or a list that you created, all based on your unique Twitter account.  The resulting unique “newpaper” features some of the interesting posts that people have sent to their part of the Twitter stream.  What it does for the end user is highlight stories and also provides a summary of what’s happening when, for some reason, you’re not connected to these accounts 24/7.

The concept intrigued me and I created my own paper.li based upon the users that I follow.  Nicely divided into sections that the service determines, it provides a nicely rounded summary of those I follow.  I only follow people that have some interest to me and the resulting newspaper is of great interest.  While my primary interest in using Twitter is connecting with other educators, I do have what I consider to be a nice bit of entrepreneurs, news and sports sources, a few celebrities, and just plain folks that I find interesting.

The “Doug Peterson Community News” is just an interesting collection of the thoughts of the over 2500 interesting sources from my online community that I read.

It’s automatically published early in the morning and I pour over the contents with a coffee much like I would with its paper cousin.  Like a traditional newspaper, its content is wide ranging.  The title page supposedly posts the best of the best and then the generated sections lets me dig deeper into the content.

I also have a second newspaper that’s created and published about 3 hours later.

From the Twitter list that I’ve created and called “Ontario Educators”, a summary of what Ontario educators are posting appears in this edition.  What I’m constantly amazed by is the rich content that educators from the province are writing and reading and sharing.

I think that, in the back of my mind, I had expected the content from both of these to be quite similar.  While there are some overlapping articles, the entirety of each is completely different.  I skim the headlines in both papers and regularly do followup to the linked articles because of the content that’s shared.

The downside?  If you recall, there was a furor because some people were offended since paper.li does a shout out of 2 or three of the sources when it makes your paper.  While some people get a hoot from being recognized, others considered the acknowledgement as a form of Twitter spam.  To the developer’s credit, they wrote some code that would allow those folks to opt out of being acknowledged for their sharing.  I still struggle with the concept but such is life.

The editions are archived so that you can return to previous issues if you need to for some reason.  I’ve tried it a couple of times and it works nicely but I don’t use it often.  I think that’s testament to the fact that Twitter is all about now and the present and less about what happened in the past.

I really enjoy both of these publications and I’d like to thank those who create the content for me just by sharing whatever it is that they’re reading.  It’s a powerful wealth of resources.  I can think of all kinds of ways to create customized newspapers for reading in virtually any kind of classroom environment.  A Computer Science daily.  A Digital Storytelling daily.  A Science daily….

The only downfall?  Well, it’s embarrassing when I spend all the time to create a blog post expressing my thoughts of the day and the editors at paper.li elect not to run with my story.  How sad is that?

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Consuming the News


I don’t just read the news; I consume the news.  There is just so much to read, to learn, to be aware of, and to understand.  In the beginning, it was just paper newspapers which now seem such a relic to the process.  But, if you just want one source and one opinion, they still have their place.

Then it was time to expand the scope and connectivity was there to help.  Big time.

For the longest of times, I would get my various news and information sources by having a reading list that I would access online.  Designers and writers do a great job of putting things together.  Yet, it was time consuming and if I happened to miss a source, it just left an empty feeling of a job undone.  Thankfully, an RSS reader approach was helpful and does a great job of aggregating the sources.  Then, I had a relapse when I started to go portable.  Individual news sources started to create their own unique mobile application.  Starving for colourful inspiration, I grabbed some of my favourites.  I still use that as a way of quick reference and specific updates.  You can’t beat the TSN application for updates for sports, for example.  When the iPad came along, I thought that I’d reached the ultimate with Flipboard.

Flipping through sources and news is terrific with this application.  I’m amazed with the design and the user interface for interacting with the information provided.  Recently, the developers have announced a whole set of built-in resources.  You’ve got to love it.  The only catch is that it’s limited to the iPad.

Within the past week, I’ve been playing around with another alternative.

Pulse News enters the playing ground with yet another approach to reading.  The interface is strangely attractive and engaging.  Sources that you subscribe to appear as bands across your screen.  With a flick, you’re skimming the articles which typically include a great image.  Find an image or a stub of information that interests you and with a tap, a window slides into place where you can read the entire story.

Like all good readers, there are hooks into Twitter, Facebook, and direct links to the actual resource on the web.  It makes skimming the news from your selected resources so easy and a tap takes you directly to the story.

What is so intriguing is that this application is not limited to just the iPad.  There is an iPhone/iPod and an Android version as well.  So, in addition to accessing the news on your bigger device, it becomes even more portable with your smaller device.  And, if your primary portable device is one of these smaller units, you can now take your news with you with this application as well.

It comes with a tonne of excellent news and entertainment sources ready to go with a simple tap but anything goes with access to any RSS feed.

A great source of information is the Pulse Blog.  It’s well worth the read and following to stay on top of things with this excellent application.

If you’re into trying out applications to see if they fit and you like to stay on top of the news, I recommend that you download and play around with this one immediately.  I think you’ll like it.

For me, it’s another stop on my morning read of the news!

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