This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Didn’t we just have a Friday the 13th? But what a beautiful moon! The nice thing about full moons in the winter is that the skies seem so much clearer and the moon so much bigger and crisper.

It’s time to share another week’s worth of reading and posting from around the province from Ontario Edubloggers. As always, some great writing to inspire thinking for you.


It’s a Matter of Relationships

I’m glad to add this blog to my collection. As I said on the voicEd Radio show, this could have been titled “A union stewart and a school principal walk into a coffee shop”. These people would be Judy Redknine and Toby Molouba.

Because they did. It’s an interesting combination given what’s happening in education and, quite honestly, something that should be seen in more places. There are most certainly lots of things to think about in education – when this post was written the current actions were only visible on the horizon.

I love this quote from the blog post.

“When your child walks into the room, does your face light up?” Our belief is that adults, like children, need this same light.  The heart of the matter is it is about our humanity.  Relationships truly matter.

Humanity and decency are things that I would suggest can be taken for granted if left alone. I really appreciate the message of collegiality that comes through in this post. Relationships are number 1. It’s a lesson for all of us. And yes, adults need to see the same light.

I wonder if the faces light up when the two sides enter the room for a round of collective bargaining. Of course they don’t. Like playing poker, you don’t want to show your hand.

But imagine if they did. Would that lead to an earlier conflict resolution?


What do trees have to do with well-being? (Trees Part Two)

A while back, I read Part One of Anne-Marie Kee’s thoughts about trees, in particular as they apply to Lakefield College School.

This is an interesting followup as she reflects on trees and how they grow, survive, and thrive. In particular, she shares some interesting observations about community and deep or not-so-deep roots in the section dealing with myths.

Towards the end, she turns to how it is so similar to today’s teenagers. Trees help each other grow and so do teenagers. In fact, by giving them the opportunity to take on more responsibility in truly meaningful ways, you do help the process. Not surprisingly, she makes the important connection to mental health and well-being.

I know that we all think we do that. Maybe it’s time to take a second look and really focus on the “meaningful”.


Shoulders of giants

Will Gourley really grounded me with his observations about giants. Perhaps because my use with computer technology, a new field in the big scheme of things, I can name and appreciate the giants in the field.

With a career in education, I can think back to the giants who I looked up to professionally. Egotistically, I remember my first days in the classroom just knowing that I was going to be this stand-out educator and change the world all on my own.

And you know what? What they told us at the Faculty was true. You could close your classroom door and nobody notices or cares!

Then, either the first Thursday or the second, there was a big package in my mailbox. It was an updated collective agreement. As a new teacher, I got the entire agreement and then the 1 or 2 page summary of changes from the recent rounds of negotiations. I was blown away to realize that I had received a raise!

That weekend, I sat down and read the agreement from cover to cover. On Monday morning, I sat down with our OSSTF rep and had a bunch of questions. I recall many being “what happened before this was in the agreement”. It was then that I got a true appreciation for the work that had gone into things over the years.

The value of being an OSSTF member continued to grow and impress me over the years. I served as our school PD rep and CBC rep for a few years and every step led to an increasing appreciation for the work that was done. When OSSTF started to provide quality professional learning, I was over the top.

I know that there are tough times during negotiations but just thinking about where you are now and how you get there is important. In a few years, those leading now will be the shoulders that others are standing on.


Hour of Code Is Coming…

Of course, I had to share this post from Arianna Lambert. Computer Science Education Week is near and dear to my heart and the Hour of Code may be the most visible thing to most. I wrote a bit this week about things that can be done with the micro:bit..

I deliberately moved her post to this week, marking the end of the Hour of Code. Why?

An hour of anything doesn’t make a significant difference. The Hour of Code should never be considered a check box to be marked done. It should be the inspiration and insight that lets you see where coding fits into the big scheme of things. It is modern. It is important. It is intimidating.

If you’ve ever taken a computer science course, you know that seldom do you get things right the first time. But every failure leads to an insight that you have for the next problem that you tackle. Student and teacher can truly become co-learners here. Why not take advantage of it?

Included in Arianna’s post is a presentation that she uses and a very nice collection of links that you can’t possibly get through in an hour. And, I would suggest that’s the point.

I know what I’ve been doing all week and plan to continue into the weekend.


My Look At The Holidays: What Are Your Stories?

I cringed when I read the title of Aviva Dunsiger’s post. After all, she had kind of dissed my post about Advent calendars.

This post was different though.

There are lots of pictures she shares about classroom activities so there is a holiday thing happening in her classroom. Check out the menorah made from water bottles.

She shifts gears a bit and tells a story of her youth. She grew up Jewish and then a second marriage gave her the Christmas experience. It’s very open and a nice sharing of her experiences. It was a side of Aviva that I’d never seen before. I appreciated it.

You’ll smile at the story of her grandmother. We all have/had a wee granny in our lives, haven’t we?


The podcast version of our live TWIOE show featuring these posts is available here.

Bonus Posts

Easy Money

I hope that Tim King and I are still friends after my comments on his post. It’s not that it’s a bad post. It’s actually very factual and outlines for any that read it teacher salaries, qualifications, benefits, etc. They’re done in Tim’s context with Upper Grand and that’s OK. With the way things are done now in the province, it’s probably pretty standard. There’s enough statistics and insight there to choke a horse. (sorry, but I grew up in a rural community)

What bothers me is that teachers somehow have to defend themselves for all that has been achieved through collective bargaining. Why can’t it just be said?

Damnit, I’m a teacher! This is what I’ve chosen to be in life; I worked hard to get here; my aspiration is to make the world better by educating those in my charge. Period. Nothing more needs to be said.

What other profession has to defend its existence every time a contract comes up for renewal? And teachers are such easy targets. We’ve all had that one teacher that we didn’t like; some people like to project that across the entire profession.

Part of Tim’s inspiration for the posts comes from the venom of “conservative-leaning reporters”. I think that may be a bit of a concession. The venom, from what I see, comes from opinion piece writers. Unlike reporters that do research, opinion pieces are based on supporting a particular viewpoint.

But, let’s go with reporter. According to Glassdoor, the average base pay in Canada is $59,000/year. That would put them about the fifth year of Category 2 in Tim’s board. For that money, they write a missive a number of times a week for their employer, attach perhaps a stock image and call it an article. The point is to feed a particular message. A truly investigative reporting would put them in a classroom for a week to really get a sense of the value educators give for their compensation. But you’d never see that.

While I know that these messages really upset educators, they should always be taken in context and understood for what they really are.

BTW, it’s not lost on me that these reporters make about $59,000 a year more than this humble blog author. I don’t even take weekends off. Who is the dummy here?


The 500 – #452 – John Prine – Debut

This is a cool concept from Marc Hodgkinson. He says

I was inspired by a podcast called The 500 hosted by Los Angeles-based comedian Josh Adam Meyers. His goal, and mine, is to explore Rolling Stone’s 2012 edition of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

What an ambitious project.

What stood out to me from this post was this new (to me, anyway) musician. I read Marc’s post and then headed over to YouTube for more. Wow, when Robert Plant names a favourite song of yours …


I hope that you can find the time to click through and read the original posts. There’s some really wonderful reading to be done here.

Then, make sure that you’re following these educators on Twitter.

  • @redknine
  • @tmolouba
  • @AMKeeLCS
  • @WillGourley
  • @MsALambert
  • @avivaloca
  • @tk1ng
  • @Mr_H_Teacher

This post comes from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

Step it up


One of the more fun, active, and interesting things that you can do with your micro:bit is to turn it into a step counter. These things are so popular in today’s world; a phenomenon starting with the Fitbit device. Now, you’ll find that counting steps is just one feature of a watch or smartphone that you own.

Making your own using the micro:bit is a pretty easy task and is one of the activities that you’ll find at the project page of the makecode resource. Or, another resource that goes a bit further in Python here.

While a lot of things can be created and run in the editor at the site, this activity is one that you’ll want a real physical micro:bit to play around with and to test.

The key to all this working is an example of another way of having the micro:bit accept input. You’re not going to use either the A or B button here but rely on the fact that the micro:bit can detect when it’s shaken. The assumption here is that each step will generate a “shake”.

I found that it worked nicely. Accuracy isn’t necessarily the goal here; it’s to get the excitement from seeing the activity in action.

In order to fully test it, you’ll need to attach the battery pack (and batteries $$) to the micro:bit so that, once you’ve loaded your code, it will work without being attached to your computer.

I took mine and tucked the micro:bit and the battery pack inside my sock and then took it for a walk. I did so some counting and it did display a count after I stopped and removed it. Unlike my watch, it’s a little more different to get an ongoing count while actually walking! I need transparent socks.

For your morning smile, I will admit that it did feel a little like being under house arrest and having to wear an ankle bracelet. (not that I’d really know) But, with the exercise complete, there really was a bit of a Wow! factor. You really can do some pretty sophisticated programming with this thing.

I think back to my original post for this series of posts about the micro:bit. Could I have done this in an hour when I first started to program? Absolutely not. Even the concept of the step counter would have been foreign at the time. But, in today’s world, what a wonderful introduction to the concept of real-world application programming for students!

Most certainly couldn’t do this


It was interesting to write yesterday’s post about the beginning of coding for me. It was a true story. My programs did have to travel for an hour to London just to run.

While I eventually got to use terminal devices to program at university, when I landed my first job it was back to writing programs on cards and sending them to the Windsor board office to run for the students. Legend had it that the nice room at the back of my classroom was supposed to have an IBM 1130 of its own but the cost was too prohibitive.

I don’t think it was all bad. Because of the 24 hour (or more) delay to get a program run, we programmers became very thorough in our programming. None of this “let’s try this and see if it works”. We had to plan and trace our way through a program. There’s nothing more frustrating than waiting 24 hours only to realize that you missed something silly.

The bottom line was that our devices (and us) were truly disconnected in the process. Of course, it’s not that way today. There really is something satisfying about seeing things happen right in front of your eyes.

After another day of playing around with the micro:bit, it’s a bit humbling to see how things that we take for granted can come to fruition. Who doesn’t have a device or used a device that is connected to something else wirelessly? It’s life as we know it.

With the micro:bit, you can easily program it to communicate with another wirelessly using the built-in radio. Look at those commands.

For the longest time, I had one micro:bit and I longed for the time when I had another just to try this. Of course, you can do it with the online simulator but there’s something about touching it.

A real breakthrough for me happened at a Minds on Media event. Jim Cash was running a coding booth and he had lots of micro:bits. I told him of my desire to just test the concept of sending a signal from one to the next. It was dead simple. I was impressed.

Then, I shared with him a project that I’d wanted to try – build a slot machine! The concept is relatively simple – there would be one master micro:bit that would be equivalent to pulling the lever. Once the lever was pulled, the other micro:bits would display the results. If I ws really greedy, I could have designed cherries, apples, pears, etc. but I settled for 1s, 2s, and 3s. We were up and running in a matter of minutes and I thanked Jim profusely for the use of his gear.

Alas, I’m without a collection of micro:bits. But, I do have a project in mind that would be fun.

When we were kids, we would play a game of “Chase the Ace” around the kitchen table with my parents. It would be interesting to implement that game on a set of these units.

Kids have it made for learning coding these days!

My Hour of Code collection for 2019 is located here.

I couldn’t have done that in an hour


With the upcoming Hour of Code and Computer Science Education Week beginning today, I’ve been playing around with a number of the tutorials that you’ll find online.

In particular, I’ve got my micro:bit out and am playing around with it using the Python programming language and the tutorials that can be found here. It’s lots of fun for me and I don’t hesitate at all when using the word “playing” in this paragraph.

If you’ve ever programmed in Python, you know that it’s a text-based language and I keep having to make sure that the syntax that I’m using is correct. There is a lot of room for error.

And, growing up learning to program, error was just part of the game. You learn to check and double-check to ensure that everything is correct.

I first learned to program in high school. Wait, Doug, they had computers back then?

Yes, indeed. Ontario even had a curriculum. It was called RP-33: Data Processing and was released in the 1960s. In 1970, there was also Informatics, Intermediate and Senior Division.

We didn’t have a computer at our school actually; we wrote our programs on punch cards and they were shipped to Althouse College in London to be run over night. The next day, we had a chance to see how well we did. Our programs were run on the computer (if I recall correctly, it was an IBM 1130) We programmed in the Fortran IV language and most of our programs were related to business functions. i.e. writing cheques, doing payrolls, inventories, etc. To think that this guy could write a program that would make a computer do something productive blew me away at the time and it still does today.

There were two elements that had to fall into place for success. First, the program had to compile successfully and secondly, it had to execute and generate the appropriate results.

It’s when I think about this that I get so impressed with the opportunities that the beginning learner has today. The second part – doing things correctly will always be the acid test to your programming skills. But, with the drag and drop interfaces that are so common, the first part actually becomes a non-starter.

Instead of learning the instructions and then the parameters needed, you just drag an action to the desktop. If the steps that you’re thinking about using actually fit together, they well, actually fit together.

From the Makecode website, I took a long look at micro:pet. It’s simple enough to get started – you’re creating a pet for a friend. But the whole package is a really rich experience. Yes, there is the coding part but beyond that, there’s making, language, interviewing, etc.

It’s the whole package.

I reflect back to how I learned to program. Typically, it was by learning one or two command or concepts and then doing a few examples and experience the success or lack of it and then move on. Even the simple act of running a program took 24 hours.

It’s just an entirely different world where beginning learners can do what I did and so much more inside an hour. It’s a great time to be learning how to code. I hope that it’s happening in your class.

As noted in this post from last week, I have created an updated Flipboard of resources for 2019. If you’re looking to join a professional organization of like minded coding teachers, consider the Association of Computer Studies Educators.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Today is supposed to be the turn around for warmer weather heading into Super Bowl weekend. Let’s hope that’s true. With all the stories about animals left out in the cold and Jaimie’s refusal to wear snow boots, we’re both looking to get out and put together a few thousand steps. According to my watch, we’re down 3 798 from last week.

In the meantime, I’m so happy to share seven amazing, thought provoking blog posts from Ontario Educators. Read on…


A Modern ‘Who Came First’ Debate

There’s no doubt in my mind for the classic debate. The chicken came first.

And, actually, I think that the modern debate has a definitive answer as well. Technology appeared before the Pedagogy to use it. In some cases, it appeared well before we learned how to use it effectively. New technology continues to emerge, on the market well before its use in the classroom has been explored or understood or even asked for.

Tina Zita understands

Modern learning is not about the tool. It is about a set of global competencies that is needed to be successful in an ever changing workforce. I struggle even writing workforce because I think it’s so much more. The global competencies are about us finding our place in our communities and contributing. 

I know that the savvy technology leaders who read this blog will agree wholeheartedly with her observations in the post.

It brings to light a bigger question though. Tina’s district is lucky that they have someone with her skills in place to provide support and leadership for educators trying to keep up. That’s not a slam against teachers; with all that’s happening, it’s the reality.

Is it malpractice for a district to buy more “stuff” – looking at you iPads and Chromebooks and the latest gadget and throwing it into the classroom without a program of professional learning to implement, understand, and sustain effective uses?


Reset?

I thought this post from Jay DuBois was interesting. He’s noting a drop in his blog posting since leaving the classroom for a coaching role.

Blogging is an interesting beast. It can truly be a way to do any type of communication that you wish.

I would suggest and recommend that he actually increase his blogging in his new position.

Why?

  • a personal documentation/diary of activities performed during the job
  • documentation for a performance appraisal (what are you doing?)
  • stay in contact with your education clients when you’re not there
  • post his schedule online
  • take and share pictures/video of exemplary practice that you witness
  • share anecdotes from visits, comments from kids
  • share and comment on your professional reading
  • highlight upcoming professional learning events

The list could go on and on. Obviously, I’m a big fan of blogging; it will be interesting to monitor Jay’s progress and see what “Reset” means to him.


Scratch 3.0 is Here!

Jim Cash is one of those guys who really stays on top of things. A visit to his station at the Minds on Media station at Bring IT, Together is a must. I have fond memories of him having a number of micro:bits on hand and so we were able to program something that I’d always wanted to do but could only visualize since I own only a single micro:bit. We used the wireless connections between them to create a primitive slot machine with a micro:bit controller and a number of other micro:bits displaying the “fruit”. If we’d had enough time, we could have calculated the payouts too.

If you’re at all interested in coding, you know that Scratch has had a major reboot recently. In this post, Jim takes us through what he considers noteworthy changes

  • Nothing that was in 2.0 has been removed in 3.0
  • 12 blocks are new or tweaked
  • Talks about enhancements
    • Extension Library – micro:bit as example
    • HTML5 and Javascript – no more Flash
    • Drawing and Sound Editing

You’ll have to read his post to catch the rest. Jim’s not done though and provides a “wish list” of things that he wants to see in the future.


I Am Right Here

If you believe that learning should be messy, then this post from TheBeastEDU should be right up your alley.

It’s all part of a story about staying in a house at the Bring IT, Together conference but The Beast stopped me at the dining room table.

I have never known a world where the dining room table is not centre of the universe. 

Now, I’ll be honest. I have never, ever lived in a house that had a dining room. We always had a kitchen table and that’s about it. It was the place for meals and we were never allowed to put our stuff on it.

One of the things that my mom always insisted was a desk for me to work at. So, I’ve always had one. It started with my grandmother’s old desk and has replaced by a couple of others over the years. In fact, I’m writing this post at one right now. As you can see, it doesn’t make things any less messy.

Don’t hate me, Andrea. I know where everything is.


R.E.A.L. Leadership


“We should trust in people, I told them, not processes.”

If there’s any takeaway from any discussion about leadership, it’s always about the people. Always, always, always.

You can always change processes…

…and you can always lead people.

What does R.E.A.L. leadership mean to Joel McLean?

  • Resourceful
  • Engaging
  • Aspiring
  • Listens

Of course, he breaks out each of these points in the post.

I wonder if there’s anything missing. I’ve always operated on the premise that the real goal of leadership is to create more leaders


Class Sizes Really Matter

Lots has been said and discussed about the trial balloon from the current government about easing up on class sizes. This includes me.

When it comes from a classroom teacher, it is grounded in their reality and beliefs. I think we’ve all had big class sizes at times. I still can’t believe that I taught a Grade 9 Mathematics class of 37 (you never forget the big numbers) in a room that seats 24. Not everyone had a textbook which further increased the pressure on all.

What I like about reading Paul McGuire’s posts is that he is able to step away from the classroom and look more at the big picture. After all, a principal should be analyzing everything that’s happening in her/his school and making recommendations and decisions going forth to carve out the best school that can be.

This got way more attention than my tweets usually do. I think this is a good thing, there are many educators who are concerned about class size in kindergarten and primary. As a former elementary principal, hard caps in grades 1-3 made a huge difference in the learning environment for children and their teachers.

In today’s reality, it’s often difficult for principals to speak out this way. Fortunately, it doesn’t stop Paul and leads nicely into his voicEd Radio show.


What school and Curling have in common

My story as a curler is certainly different from Jennifer Casa-Todd’s. My experience was as a member of the high school curling team. I don’t even recall what position on the team I was; just that four of us were asked to be on the team because our parents curled. Is that skill even transferable?

I don’t even recall who our Skip was and I certainly don’t recall him being supportive of us growing as team members. For us, it was a couple of days away from classes to practice and then to compete in a bonspiel. If I remember correctly, we played one game before being knocked out – curling wasn’t big in my town because we had to go to a completely different town to even play. But, I got my school Curling badge to count towards my school total.

And, like in Jennifer’s post, I do recall a lot of yelling. When “sweep” was yelled, we really did sweep not like today’s brushing…

And, back to her post – after all, it’s about her and not me! Jennifer shares a story of growing in the sport going from Lead to Second. That is indeed a major change requiring more skills. Jennifer focuses on the takeout and how her Skip is helping her develop this and other new skills. Therein lies the comparison between school and curling.

Yelling for inspiration is required in one and optional in the other.

If curling is new to you, take the two minutes it takes to watch the video and you’ll be up to speed! Two minutes to understand and a lifetime to master.


I hope this little read warms up your Friday morning.

Follow these bloggers on Twitter for more great content.

This post is part of a regular Friday morning routine around here. You can check out all the past posts in the link above.

This post is original on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

and nowhere else.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Happy First Friday of 2019.

Please read and enjoy this selection from Ontario Edubloggers.


Chocolate by Trial and Error

Sheila Stewart writes a post that will bring out your inner Julia Child. It’s a real departure from her regular posts – the previous one was about Effective School Councils – but still an interesting read.

As we conclude the holidays, we might be looking back at the great (and sweet) treats from the past couple of weeks.

If you’re looking for something to bake this weekend, and you enjoy chocolate, Sheila shares her recipe for a Chocolate Mint Pie.


Hack the Classroom 2018

There are people’s favourite venues for showing off the latest and greatest things that kids can do. Unlike exhibitor sessions with professionals and pre-planned scripts, it’s always interesting to see what students can actually do when you give them the right tools.

As Zélia Capitão-Tavares notes …

WE need to create opportunities to immerse students within the Global Competencies to develop deep learning through experiences that integrate creativity, inquiry and entrepreneurship.

What leapt from this post as interesting, innovative, and true to Zélia’s premise above was a group of students developing games that students in the Deaf & Hard of Hearing classes could enjoy. The Micro:Bit was the tool of choice.

When you think about how much games depend upon background music and audio feedback to players, I’m sure that the students the games were designed for felt a great sense of being included.


The best present is one you can give year round

From the Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning Blog, Will Gourley shares an inspirational message for 2019.

Through the holiday season, there are charities and causes at every turn using the holiday season as inspiration for garnering support. Many try to get enough to sustain them through the upcoming year.

Although, traditional presents are nice, it has been my experience to savour the moments when we are able to strengthen our class community through quality time together. Long after the sweetness of a treat or period off for a movie has been forgotten, students remember being part of something special that benefitted others.

So, what would be the “something special”?

Read the post to get some ideas and inspiration that are both timely and most definitely worthwhile and would be well appreciated.


Fill Your Own Cup With Gratitude

Before reading Ramona Meharg’s blog post, I might have offered February as being the toughest of months in education but she builds the case for November. The holiday-less month.

Through a series of events, you can’t help but show empathy for what she describes and it might well be that you are/were in the same case.

Ramona’s solution was to reach out to her Marigold for support.

and a cup of tea?

If you have experienced the same thing and can offer a solution or just to share a story, Ramona’s looking for it in her comments.


An Oscar-esque thank you speech type of blog post

Or, maybe you could make an Oscar type speech to appreciate those things that have gone right and those who have been so supportive like Melanie Lefebvre did.

The big message in this post is the “autonomy” that educators have. Sure, everyone has curriculum and standards and content and … that have to be covered. That’s why we have courses and grades. But, the “how” of doing it honours the autonomy concept. That makes teaching the greatest of professions.

In the post, Melanie acknowledges …

  • Dean
  • JACS team?
  • IT Department
  • The Hub?
  • Health and Safety
  • Maintenance Team
  • Library
  • P and VP of Academics

as contributing to her success in the beginning of this new career for her.

It’s probably a good activity for all to do with a personal reflection that nobody can do it alone in education.

In typical Oscar fashion, after a while the music starts!


Making the Shift Toward Tracking Observations

Here’s advice from the bottom of the post from Heather Theijsmeijer …

This may feel like a lot of work, however keep in mind that not only does this process get easier over time (remember how much longer it took you to set a test when you first started teaching?), but the point of assessing observations is that it can replace a product-based assessment, on the road to triangulating sources of evidence. This is not meant to be done in addition to your current stack of marking. 

Hands up if you remember the days when final grades were calculated and assigned through three tests and a final examination.

That pretty much includes anyone who ever went through the school system 10-20 years ago and then to university. I still remember a picture from a university newspaper showing hundreds of students at desks in the gym writing final exams and the caption “Here, you’re just a number”.

How things have changed and we now focus on daily observations and progression towards understanding course expectations. In this post, Heather offers some suggestions, including a link to a previous post, as inspiration. Yes, there are brand names included but it shouldn’t take a huge leap to recognize that there are other products that you have access to that will have the same or better functionality.


Addition of double digit numbers

What if you threw a party and nobody came?

That was my first reaction when I read this post from Lisa Corbett.

She had her class all set and prepped to move along to number lines.

The best laid plans…

As I walked around I could see lots of kids with lots of right answers but no number lines. “How are they doing this??” I wondered. So I asked. And I was amazed! So many of them were using the mental math strategy of splitting. They thought about how many ones there were in each number, and how many tens were in each number, then they found a total.

I hope that she felt good that they had mastered their previous learning and felt confident enough to use it in this new situation.

So, what do you do?

To use a football analogy, you drop back 10 and punt.

You’ll have to click through to see Lisa’s professional judgement click in!


What a lovely collection of blog posts to finish off the Christmas Break. Please take the time to click through and enjoy them. And, drop off a comment or two if you’re so inspired.

If you’re an Ontario Edublogger and not on the Livebinder, please click through and add the link to your blog.

Then, follow the great bloggers references in this post.

This post appears at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you found it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Friday morning is cleanup time in my browser.  I typically have the blog posts that I want highlighted in this post open since my This Week in Ontario Edublogs show on voicEd Radio on Wednesday.  It’s always a clean start when I’m done!

What would we do in a world without browser tabs?  Oh, yeah, have a multitude of bookmark files…


Creators of Content through Gaming via the micro:bit

There really is nothing like playing around with a micro:bit connected to your computer.  You can do all kinds of things with it, and it’s priced so affordably.  In this post, Derek Tangredi takes us a little further.

The greater benefit I see in making games is that it provides ample opportunity for subject integration.  Attempting to create fully immersive experiences while adhering to intended outcomes can be daunting for some and these “maker” based projects can provide that landscape.

This post is a true “maker” post.  I can say that because the project starts with a cardboard box.  When you’re done, you’ve created your own arcade.

Derek includes a couple of videos to help you thought the process.


Google Input

I had previously talked about the Preserve our Language Project and the amazing job that these students had done with creating an Ojibway keyboard for the Macintosh computer.

This project is a team effort by Rayne, Gene, Tarcisius, Joan, and principal Mike Filipetti.

The latest check in to their site reveals that the project continues and their efforts are now available in the Google Input Tools.

keyboard

You can try it out online or get the extension or Android application.

This project continues to amaze and impress me.  When was the last time you did something that will change a part of the world?


Leading to Win or Leading to Grow

Those who would post quotes to social media and then hope that others share them would be well advised to read this post from Anne Marie Luce.

After reading her post, I think that the best advice for anyone who plays in the “leading” area needs to think about the long run.  The short little blast that gets you some sort of fame quickly fades.  The leader that works hard to create more leaders by bringing out the best in people are in there for the right reasons and for the duration.

Building leaders and capacity is hard work.  Anne Marie links to a blog post that inspired this one and it’s certainly equally as inspirational.

I like her notion of a healthy organization.

How do we create a healthy organization that ignites passion in others and allows them to take risks to explore it?

As the March Break comes to an end, perhaps a few moments to reflect on your own organization is in order.  Would you consider it to be healthy?  If not, what can you do about it?


Analogy for ‘Learning’

So, Helen DeWaard shares her homework for Ontario Extend in this post.  It was in response to a provocation

misunderstood

You’re probably thinking about your own discipline right now and I’m sure that the answer to that question could lead to a number of discussions.

One of the areas that Helen brings into play is that of prior knowledge.  I think that most of us assume that this is a good thing.  But, is it always?

In our radio show, Stephen Hurley and I talked a bit about mathematics and the challenges that can exist.

  • going from one teacher to another or one school to another with different approaches to mathematics
  • mom and dad helping with homework
  • the after school paid homework services
  • …  add your own

How many variations on a topic is possible?  Any chance that there’s a misunderstanding anywhere?


#TableTalkED

Last week, we looked at “Filled to the Brim”.  The concept was to get together and talk professionally outside of the school.  This is a nice continuation of the concept by Tina Zita where she describes a Saturday afternoon with a nice bunch of Ontario Educators.  I’d call is a “school of Ontario Educators” but that sounds a little fishy.

The topics, as outlined in the post seemed to settle around.

  • Relationships
  • Balance
  • Ideas

As I looked around the boardroom table picture from the post, I see some familiar faces, lots of food and no technology.

I thought this was a bit peculiar since the meeting was hosted by startup Soapbox which has an interesting application that looks like it could be used to start or continue these conversations.


Student Digital Leadership in action

One of the faces around the table was Jennifer Casa-Todd who blogged to make the connection between student social activism and some of the points in her book SocialLEADia.

I particularly like her advance warning because I feel the same way.

I have been watching the #NeverAgain movement over the past week. I am always reluctant to share anything overly political; especially when it comes to American politics, because I know that as an outsider things look simplistic when indeed they may be very complicated.

The actions that happened this week prove, without question, that students have a voice and can be passionate about their cause.  I happened to be at a television set and flipped through a number of news channels during the walkouts on Wednesday.  It was interesting to note which news channels had coverage and actually reporters on the ground reporting live and honouring student voice.  There was one news channel that didn’t even mention it.

No wonder students are so frustrated looking for a solution that, as an outsider, seems so easy to resolve.

Politicians need to be keenly aware of the message of students signing up to vote for the first time and to vote for those who have a viable platform based upon their safety.


Temporal Prejudices

Tim King was inspired by a sharing of a story about Winston Churchill to write this post.

He sets the context.

I’ve seen people time and again criticize those who lived before them as being immoral and somehow answerable to the laughable ethics of our own time. That article on Churchill, a man who lived at the end of the British Empire and spent much of his career trying to hold the tattered pieces of it together, often using the same kind of bombastic rhetoric you still see today, is no doubt accurate, but the re-defining of statements made over a century ago based on modern values is neither fair nor particularly useful, unless you’re a politician trying to win a point.

The whole blog post got me thinking, in particular how education handles topics like this.  I’m thinking, in particular, of a Grade 11 History class.  For our studies, we had “The Book”.  It was given to us at the first of the year and it was “the truth” and we just learned what was enclosed in the book.

I like where Tim takes this.  I suspect, that under scrutiny, we didn’t view topics from the enlightened view of an objective historian.  We did try to picture the past and relate it to the life that we were currently living.

Even when we would research the biography of a historic figure, it was through the eyes of the biographer and they wouldn’t have been chosen for their objectivity but for their ability to write something that’s pleasing.

In today’s world, not only do we have a Biography Channel on television, but we have more news and resources that would just be unfathomable to those in Churchill’s time.  We have so many versions of the truth available for any topic.  If we don’t like the coverage on a particular channel, we just change the channel until we get something that we want.

What will those who follow us think of us?


Why It’s Time to End Publicly Funded of Catholic Schools in 2018

When I talk to my US friends, they really find it unbelievable that we have so many publically funded schools in Ontario.  We’ve just been accustomed to it.  As an aside, they’re really impressed that we have a Computer Studies curriculum available for every school.

In this post, and consider that it’s posted on an ETFO website, Deborah Weston takes on this question and provides opinion and statistics to argue for a change.

We’re coming up on a Spring Ontario election.  Will this be a position that one or more of the political parties adopt?


And, with one final click, I’ve closed off the last remaining tab and I think my computer is breathing a sigh of relief.  Between the original blog posts and the supporting resources, I had almost 30 tabs open.

But, please do take the time to read through and check out all of these wonderful posts and drop off a comment if you’re inspired.  The, check out the rest of the Ontario Edubloggers in this Livebinder.

And, follow these great bloggers.