Mapping Crime


The Global Security Map attempts to map the world, showing us where the bad stuff is located.  For its purposes, it tries to identify “malware, phishing, spam and other malicious activities”.

Upon your first landing, you’ll be presented with the world with countries coded from green to red or low to uh oh.

I’m a big fan of infographics to immediate share an image and message and maps have always lent themselves to visualize things.  In this case, it’s the malware that the concerned, connected computer user needs to keep in mind.

You’ll definitely want to read how the site determines the colours and the severity of the threats.  The descriptions of the threats is particularly helpful. A tool such of this opens the door for discussion about safety online.  Why would some countries be orange and red?  Why would some be green?  Is Antarctica really the safest place on the planet?

Mouse over the countries and click to get the summary for that country.

Can you find #1?  How about #219?

Don’t forget to click the grey triangles to open each category to reveal the details for each category.

It’s a fascinating look at our online world and a great conversation starter and launchpad for further research into online safety.

Time, Visualized


One of the things about being connected to educators online that might be frustrating occurs when they’re not necessarily in your time zone.  I sent you a message – why haven’t you responded?

It might be that you’re boring or it may well be that it’s very late where they are and they’ve just gone to bed!  There are definitely conversion web sites to help you out with that or just ask Google.

Heck, with Google suggestions, you don’t even need to finish your question before you have your answer.  

What if you want it all?  What if you want it visualized?  Then you need to head to the Earth Time Clock.

Staring down from space, at the moment, see our beautiful planet and just where the sun is shining.

On the right side of the screen, you’ll be able to see the current times from locations around the planet.

The resource also features a simulation so that you can see the sun rise and sun set for a particular location.  Don’t forget to click on the moon status as well!

Take a few moments to play with this simulation.  I’ll bet that you get all kinds of ideas for how you could use it in your classroom to address curriculum expectations.  If you like simulations, I’m sure you’ll be fascinated by it.

How We’re Connected


It’s no secret that I love exploring with maps.  I think it can be the ultimate infographic! 

If you spend a lot of time exploring a map, there are so many great stories behind it.

This resource is just plain fascinating.  It’s called “Greg’s Cable Map“.

The map, created in Google Maps, shows under water cable connections, current and future. 

Navigate the map by mousing over a cable and the name and details of the cable appear at the bottom of your display.  On the right, click on the name of the specific connection for details and further links.  There is a caution that the details may not be completely accurate in location.  That’s completely understandable.

If you want to take the politics out of things, switch from the basic map to a satellite representation.

I’ll bet that you’ll find yourself being a connected global navigator in no time at all.  Of course, it makes for wonderful classroom discussion!