10 years ago


Wow, this blog is really old!

For yucks, and I didn’t know what to expect, I turned the clock back to see what I was talking about 10 years ago. I can’t remember for sure but I’d bet real money that it wasn’t raining with a forecasted high of 11 degrees.

On December 30, 2009

I had a post about Digital Footprints and, of course, my collection of OTR Links

Well, I figured, I must have said something about the new year on December 31. I was wrong.

Apparently, we were gearing up for a Blue moon.

While looking back, it was interesting to see what my personal state of blogging was like. I do like the fact that I was blogging regularly. There’s just something empowering about sitting down and hashing out a few words and thoughts.

Looking at the post brought back a bit of technology memories as well. 10 years ago, I recall that the WordPress editor wasn’t the powerful tool that it is today. I was using a web browser application called Scribefire for my editor. It appears to still be available for Chrome but I couldn’t fire a Firefox version. The new block editor currently suits my needs fine. Scribefire, I recall, was nice in the fact that its interface was similar to OpenOffice / Microsoft Word.

In addition, there was a whole collection of social media sharing links at the bottom of the post. I guess that it was important to me at the time that my thoughts were shared on a number of different platforms. I don’t do that anymore; in fact, mousing over the icons brought back memories of some other platforms.

How many of those can you identify by icon?

The nice thing, for consistency purposes, is that the current theme that I’m using is applied to that content. I know that I wasn’t using this one back then. Heck, I wasn’t even using it one year ago.

I suppose the bigger question will be – will this blog still be around 10 years from now? Will I be curious to look back as we head into 2030 to see what I was writing about? Will blogging even be a thing then?

Stay tuned.

My Week Ending 2019-12-29


Here’s a summary of some of the things I learned and published this week.


Readings 

You can follow my daily readings as they happen here.  Below are a selected few, with commentary, from the past week.

  • My empathy goes out to this blogger. I once had to teach Mathematics to 30 students is a room that sat 24. Doable, I recall, but nowhere near 36 students.
  • I guess because you can go wherever you want in Canada and won’t be bothered or asked about the accent?
  • A great story about Canadian firefighters. I hope that they’re able to make a substantial difference and get things under control.
  • Cheap is good; free is better as they say. Here’s a big list of Free Resources crowd sourced on Rediit.
  • If things are looking promising in Denmark, you just know that Canada can’t be far behind.
  • Every now and again, I’ll take a look when in a story or elsewhere. There is a LOT of Windows 7 still in operation.
  • Because the legions of fanboys like new stuff and don’t mind forking money over to Apple.
  • This is actually pretty much truthful and could work. But, in education, we don’t like being in the open and like to have the opportunity to close the classroom doors. Open concept schools are putting up walls all over the place.
  • I don’t think I would pay to use someone else’s lessons. Knowing me, I’d find fault and would want to change them.
  • I have a friend who swears that he could hear the Northern Lights. Not calling him a liar but I think seeing them would be more impressive.
  • On the other hand, if Betelgeuse explodes, there could be a lot of noise. Can you hear it in the vacuum of space?
  • This is pretty much true. The only place here where you can buy them other than at Walmart are at the used media store. The cool thing is that they also sell record albums. Just saying…
  • It is pretty obvious to any that see me that my personality screams – dog walker – and not by the way I walk, but by my walking partner.
  • I’m a sucker for these articles and yet I keep wondering why if the authors says change them immediately they didn’t come that way from the manufacturer.
  • So, if you have an open source crystal ball, you can write articles about the future of Linux!
  • I’m bookmarking this site on the off chance that we get high speed internet soon. We have the pole in the front yard.

Blog Posts on doug … off the record

My daily contributions to this blog.


#FollowFriday – December 27, 2019

https://wke.lt/w/s/PqIAQJ


voicEd Radio

My on demand radio page can be found here.  

Since Christmas was on the Wednesday, there was no show this week. But, enjoy a rerun of Run Run Rudolph this time from Kelly Clarkson.

Intro song


Technology Troubleshooting

One of the things that I really like about technology is the option to change the language. There’s nothing better than Canadian English to make this guy feel right at home.

Then, there’s nothing worse than the technology just going ahead and doing whatever it wants.

One of my Christmas gifts looked promising but alas, it serves up American spelling despite my change in settings. Sadly, there’s no amount of troubleshooting to resolve this.


Video of the Week

I was fascinated by this. Lots of great learning about country borders.


Photo of the Week

It was so warm on Christmas day that my daughter and I took the dog for a walk at the beach and dock at Colchester. Look at all the ice; who would have guessed that it was 11 degrees there?

Thanks for reading. Please join me daily for something new and, hopefully, interesting.

dp

This blog post was originally posted at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com/

If you find it anywhere else, it’s not original.

Whatever happened to …


… waterbeds?

Good question and thanks Alfred Thompson for suggesting it.

At one time they were the big thing and now poof they are gone.

I think he nailed it with that one sentence.

They were indeed a big thing and I can remember checking them out at a store devoted to them once. Kind of pricey and you were forbidden for randomly trying them out. Maybe if you were serious about a purchase?

But, in recent times, I’ve haven’t seen one. We have a local traditional mattress manufacturer and our latest purchase was from there. Big display floor; no waterbeds.

But, apparently, they are still available for purchase on Wayfair.

I’ve never owned one. Actually, I’ve never had the desire to own one. But, I slept on one once.

For years, our summer holidays involved dropping the kids off at their grandparents and then my wife and I heading off separately to have our own week of holidays. Typically, we would go to Niagara Falls since there was so much to do there and we really enjoyed the Christmas Store even though it was so warm out in mid-July.

As per our usual, we would check into a hotel on Lundy’s Lane and use that as ground zero for our daily explorations. One year, we decided to get a room with a waterbed – just to try it out. It was more expensive but we were worth it. The bed didn’t have water channels in it. It was just one big bladder and it was so full that it kind of bulged up in the middle. Finally, a chance to try a water bed!

Carefully, I crawled on; I was picturing what kind of mess it would be if I punctured it so I was slow and cautious. It took a bit but finally the rocking motion subsided. At that point, it was just a bed. There was touristy stuff to do so off we went.

When we returned, it was lights out.

But not quite a peaceful sleep. When either of us rolled over or even moved, the water did too. I’ve been on a cruise ship but I think this was the closest I’ve been to being sea sick on a bed. I distinctly remember being angry with the situation and not being able to sleep so had rolled onto my side quickly and smashing my elbow into the wood bed frame that went all around the bed. Hurt, Pain, Ouch!

Fortunately, there was a chair and footstool in the room to help me get through the night. Such was my waterbed experience. It’s not a great story.

How about you?

  • Do you own a waterbed?
  • Have you ever owned a waterbed?
  • I have no doubt that the one that we had in Niagara Falls would have been “first generation” and that the technology improved. Do you think the channelled bed would be better?
  • Have you ever seen a waterbed for sale in a store near you recently?
  • Have you ever slept on a waterbed? Any experiences to share?

Please share your thoughts in the comments below. I’m sure that Alfred will enjoy reading them. (me too)

If you have any ideas for a future post, let me know or just add it to this Padlet. I like this Sunday feature and the number of people that are attracted for content or maybe just curious about the nondescript blog title.

This post appears on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

My Week Ending 2019-12-22


Here’s a summary of some of the things I learned and published this week.


Readings 

You can follow my daily readings as they happen here.  Below are a selected few, with commentary, from the past week.

  • These pictures are well worth the time to scroll through and enjoy. It’s like a history of the past year of some things I knew and some things I didn’t.
  • I’ll admit that I absolutely hated the Edge browser that Microsoft shipped with Windows 10 and pretty much crammed down our throats. The new Chromium based one isn’t all that bad at all. I’m sure we’ll still eventually get nagged to death to use it under Windows.
  • I think everyone needs to get up to speed with the terminology behind VPNs. I see this in everyone’s future.
  • Here’s a story about teacher salaries. Now, in Ontario, things are currently better but the story is much the same.
  • Has there been anything more promoted about the future in connected users than 5G? Interesting article about it in the house.
  • You’d think that, with a title like this, it would live up to itself as people played it. I can tell you that not everyone got perfect – at least in the circles that I run.
  • This is a source for great Christmas wallpapers if you’re into changing your wallpaper for the season. Other good stuff too.
  • Good for Google. They need to keep developers honest. I’m very disappointed in these products; they were once held with high regard. Now, not so much.
  • It almost is enough to scare you off the internet or to find one place where you can authenticate to. Then, when the worst happens, you just change one password.
  • If this doesn’t make you double-check resources you find on the Internet, I don’t know what will. But, it begs a bigger question – who is the ultimate arbitrar?
  • Guess what? Another article about which is the best web browser. You should know by now that I’m a sucker for these.
  • I thought that a “complete guide” might be overkill until I read the article Google Chrome has so many different places where it might be installed and it functions differently depending upon location.
  • This is genius for wrapping Christmas gifts. Actually, for any gifts. Who says that there isn’t room to learn new things daily?
  • With so many different vendors and equipment and processors, it comes as no surprise that Windows 10 had so many mistakes this past year.
  • It’s only by one day but enough to scare some people. On the other hand, Labour Day would be embedded into the fall semester.

Blog Posts on doug … off the record

My daily contributions to this blog.


#FollowFriday – December 20, 2019

https://wke.lt/w/s/RvBWSy


voicEd Radio

My on demand radio page can be found here.  

This week’s show – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/20854909

Intro song

Blog posts this week came from:

  • @zeliamct
  • @Jay__Dubois
  • @MzMollyTL
  • @mcguirp
  • @greeneterry

Technology Troubleshooting

I always wonder at the value of doing this blog post every week. Does anyone actually read it? After all, everything (except this section) has appeared somewhere on this blog. But then I remember the #1 rule of blogging; you do it for yourself. It’s a nice opportunity to review my past week’s personal learning.

Normally, I sit at a desk with a mouse and real keyboard when I type it.

Not so this morning. I have my MacBook Pro in my lap and I’m typing while I watch the pre-pre-game show for today’s football events.

This is definitely the “linkiest” blog post that I do every week. I find that it’s taking longer than ever to write because of the trackpad scrolling and the keyboard highlighting of text.

I don’t see this as being the new norm for writing this. It’s really painful compared with working with a real mouse and a real keyboard. I’m in awe of people that can write blog posts on a tablet.


Video of the Week

What’s Christmas without Burl Ives singing?


Photo of the Week

A favourite display from the King’s Navy Yard. And, yes, the feathers are animated.

Thanks for reading. Please join me daily for something new and, hopefully, interesting.

dp

This blog post was originally posted at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com/

If you find it anywhere else, it’s not original.

Whatever happened to …


… tinsel?

If you have a Christmas tree within eyesight, it will be interesting to share whether or not you have tinsel on it.

These days, it can come in many different forms. Growing up, for us it came in long metallic strips and we had it all over the family Christmas tree. Real trees in the beginning and later artificial. When I branched out on my own, it was a tradition that didn’t follow. Although …

It was a big deal for my mother. After the tree was up, the decorations added, the lights arranged, the crowning touch was strips of tinsel all over the tree. The effect was impressive. The metal in the tinsel amplified the lights making it appear that there was much more than there actually were. Leading up to Christmas, it was hard to deny that it really made for a beautiful effect.

It was after Christmas that the real pain hit. It was a tedious process because the family would all gather to take the tinsel off and carefully wrap it around some cardboard for storage until next year. We worked hard at it and yet there was still this stuff seemingly everywhere including out by the street for the real tree pickup date. When we moved to the artificial tree, some of that stuff ended up being packed away with the tree, only to return next year.

It was also a personal decoration for some of my high school girls who would weave it into their hair for an effect. At times, it became a classroom management issue. My room had carpeting and if you didn’t have running shoes on with rubber soles, you could shuffle your feet and touch a tinsel strip in the hair and get a yelp from the static electricity! But the worst thing ever happened when a strip got sucked into a desktop computer and caused a short as the tinsel made contact with places that didn’t need contact. Needless to say, banning of tinsel from the classroom didn’t help my Scrooge image.

I’d like to say that tinsel is not a thing around here these days. But every now and again a strip appears. We’ve inherited my parent’s old tree and many of their decorations and every now and again, one appears. That does bring back memories

For the last Sunday going into Christmas…

  • do you use tinsel on your Christmas tree?
  • is there a secret to collecting it all after the fact?
  • does tinsel appear in any different form at your place?
  • have you ever experienced the static electricity from tinsel or any other decoration?
  • as for the decorative effect, yes or no?

Please share your shiny thoughts in the comments below.

This post originated from:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.