This Week in Ontario Edublogs


And, it’s another Friday. Actually, it’s Thursday morning as I write this post but that’s the way things roll around here.


Writing a SPOOKY Story!

I’ve written about Cameron Steltman’s writing activity for his students many times before. I think it’s truly unique, inspirational for both students and parents, and easily borrowed by others who want students to write for a purpose and write for an audience.

It’s straight forward.

He starts a new blog post with a theme and instructions for his students. Their job is to read and understand his post and then do some writing of their own in the replies. There’s so much right with this activity.

This time, he uses this image to inspire.

The student job? They look at the image and write a spooky story telling Mr. Steltman, their classmates, their parents, me, you, and anyone else who drops by how they interpret the image and turn it into their own spooky story!


Negative TikTok Challenges and Student Digital Leadership

The typical approach to dealing with bad things in education comes from a long time ago from the Baretta theme song .

“Don’t do the time if you can’t do the crime.”

Or maybe something more contemporary.

We know how well that works out. Jennifer Casa-Todd has a different take on things. In a school where there is one principal and one vice-principal for 1000 or more students, those enforcing the rules are really outnumbered.

Consistent with Jennifer’s message in SocialLEADia, she sees another way. Put the power of students to work to address this. I feel that it honours their leadership and an innate desire to do the right thing.

The prompt for this was the Negative TikTok Challenge and Jennifer includes them in her post.

  • September: Vandalize school bathrooms
  • October: Smack a staff member
  • November: Kiss your friend’s girlfriend at school
  • December: Deck the halls and show your balls
  • January: Jab a breast
  • February: Mess up school signs
  • March: Make a mess in the courtyard or cafeteria
  • April: “Grab some eggz” (another stealing challenge or inappropriate touching)
  • May: Ditch day
  • June: Flip off in the front office
  • July: Spray a neighbor’s fence

Her approach is an interesting turn on things and I think she may be on to something. Your school needs to have this book in their library. There’s so much wisdom here and it’s all based on the premise that people want to do good things and things for good.

Disclaimer: I did help Jennifer with advice and proofreading of this book.


Leadership and the matter of judgement:An open letter to Prime Minster Trudeau

I enjoy reading Charles Pascal’s writing and insights. Given his past career choices, he’s gone places and seen things that the rest of us in education only get to hear about third or fourth or more hand.

Many of us “could” write to our leaders and get a form letter back (or nothing in the case of around here) but taking your message public could be powerful in that we’re seeing his insights if we care to read them. And I did.

In this case, it’s an letter to our Prime Minister about his choice to go on vacation during the first Truth and Reconciliation holiday. Charles uses the analogy to baseball as commitng an unforced error. There were a lot of things that could have been done on that day. I would think that he would have been welcomed to many communities across the country to address them and the nation.

As we know, we’re just off an election that was controversial in itself. There’s some great advice in Charles’ post

Prime Minister, it is not too late to close the gap between your many worthy and important publicly stated aspirations and meaningful actions. 

Will he follow Charles’ advice?


It’s That Time of Year…

One of the powerful voices helping people understand how media works, its power and influence, and how we should interpret that media is Media Smarts. This year, Media Literacy Week is October 25 to October 30.

Anthony Perrottta is a regular speaker during this event and this year is no exception. He’s doing to give a talk about Digital Portfolios and The Power of Story.

His presentation is on Wednesday at 4:30 and you can sign up from the link in the post.

One of the advantages of COVID for professional learning is that we don’t have to go anywhere except to our computers to take in quality professional learning so do it.

The post also includes links to Anthony’s past presentations.


Talking Like a Teacher

I don’t often disagree with Diana Maliszewski and I’m not sure whether or not I do this time around.

She was asked to co-present a lecture on “Finding Trusted Sources and Evaluating Information” but was advised to not “talk like a teacher”.

In the post, she takes the time to address both the pros and cons of “talking like a teacher”. Maybe I’m narrow minded but I don’t see both sides. I replied to the post on her blog with:

Thank you for my morning smile, Diana. It’s a phrase around here when I correct my wife and kids over language errors “Daaaaad, you’re such a teacher”. I wear it like a badge of honour.

I don’t think you should ever apologize for being a teacher. You’ve devoted your life to your craft and I’m guessing you were asked to speak based upon your skills and reputation. It’s a great compliment. Consider the thousands of people that could have been asked, it ended up being the two of you. I can’t believe that it was a random choice.

My wife is a nurse and when I have a boo-boo, I go to her for her skills; I don’t rely on what I’ve seen on television.

Nobody can have it all but you can certainly relish in the parts that you do have and you will always be a teacher. That’s to be celebrated.

It’s a few days later since I first read Diana’s post, I talked about it on the voicEd Radio show and now I’m writing and I remain every bit convinced of my position.

Either way, knowing Diana, the presentation would have been fun and full of great information, I’m sure.


NETWORKING AT THE TESL ONTARIO ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Probably something like this has never been so important as it is during these days. Networking has always been an important part of conference going and was an important concept for Cyndie Jacobs and I when we co-chaired the Bring IT, Together conference in 2013 and 2014.

Dave Fraser starts off this post with the familiar approach.

When we think of “networking” at a conference, we tend to think of coffee breaks and catching up with colleagues in hotel lobbies and banquet centre hallways.

Been there, done that, and it’s a great chance to catch up with old friends from all over the place. But, that’s only part of the potential. Cyndie and I realized that there was a lot of “other” times with potential for participating in other things. In this post, Dave outlines a bunch of other opportunities that they’ve planned for other than the sessions. I think that’s incredibly important as well as the sessions and it sends the message that the conference is more than a money grab from registrations – that the organization places value in making connections to take away from the event.

It’s tough to pull off when everyone’s online but they seem to have thought through this to give attendees the chance to meet up with others with similar interests. Round table discussions would be interesting.

The platform that they’re using is a new one for me to look at and explore.


Math Links for Week Ending Oct 15th, 2021

The mathematics person is me always looks forward to posts from David Petro. I find it just plain interesting to work my way through them, smiling at his interpretation before I right click and open in a new tab so that I can return and continue my trek through his post.

This past week, regular readers of this blog will know that I was so excited with one of his curated items that I used it as inspiration for a complete blog post here.

He runs the gamut of classes and grades so not all of the links will be immediately useful for everyone except those that like to play with mathematics just for the sake of playing with mathematics and who doesn’t? There’s nothing wrong with a little side learning and this blog covers that nicely.


Please take the time to follow these great Ontario educational bloggers.

  • Cameron Steltman – @MrSteltman
  • Jennifer Casa-Todd – @JCasaTodd
  • Charles Pascal – @cepascal
  • Anthony Perrotta – @aperrottatweets
  • Diana Maliszewski – @MzMollyTL
  • Dave Frazer – @teslontario
  • David Petro – @davidpetro314

This week’s show on voicEd Radio.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


It’s another Friday, a long weekend, and an opportunity for me to share some thoughts about some great reading I did this past week from Ontario Edubloggers.


Slice of Life: What’s That Smell?

How’s that for a blog title inspiring a musical memory? The title connects to Elizabeth Lyons’ post and that’s pretty much sums it up.

She blogs about a smell that her husband’s super sensitive nose and a smell in the house. After I read the post, I told Jaimie about the first accused and his response was:

Always blame the dog

After reading the post, I can report that the dog was finally left off the hook and they did find the source of the smell. You’ll have to click through to find out where in Elizabeth’s little Slice of Life.


Ripping #SOL

Here’s another Slice of Life post, this time from Melanie White.

It’s a fun post that talks about friends, colleagues, support, and emoji. Oh, and buying books

because the students need some joy

There’s a great deal of joy indeed in reading this post and I can’t help but reflect on the value of friendships that flows from Melanie’s writing. There is, of course, the friendship that she and her two friends have together but then also the online friends that checked in with comments.

Off on a tangent, she uses the word emojis to note the plural of emoji. Now, I’m not an English teacher but it just kind of made my eyes water so I did some research and it appears that both are acceptable. I guess it’s another reason why people find English so difficult to learn.

But, my research did lead me to this wonderful resource – https://emojipedia.org/


School Communication Plan

If you have plans to become a principal or you are a principal and you have questions about the effectiveness of your own communication plan, you would be well advised to check out Jessica Outram’s latest post.

With a grin on my face, the only thing that I found missing was it being published as a poem!

She had my interest when I took a first look at her post and she saw that her Staff Handbook was digital. How many of you still get a physical binder with resources in September and it’s supposed to last you for the entire school year?

There are two big ideas in the post:

  • Big Idea #1: If we communicate effectively with parents we will share the school’s story, better serve students, and build better partnerships and sense of belonging and pride.
  • Big Idea #2: If we communicate effectively with each other we will strengthen our team, collaborate more, and ensure consistency.

The big ideas are nicely fleshed out as she addresses Whole School Communication, Principal to Staff Communication, and Staff to Parent Communication Plan.

I’d be willing to bet that she’d be open to constructive criticism with her plans to help it grow and become even better.


Starting Thinking Classroom Socially Distanced

There’s a strong message here that Amy Bowker is happy to be back in her classroom, despite the physical limitations. When she describes what normally happens in her classroom, it’s easy to see that it didn’t translate easily to working online.

For those who are thinking that back to school in COVID days involves sitting at a socially distance desk space, you’ll have your mind changed after reading Amy’s post.

I couldn’t believe the amount of engagement during this series of problems. The students were so into solving the problems that they were running back and forth from the projector to their whiteboards.

It was nice to see her give a nod to the artistic abilities of Laura Wheeler for her drawings in the Thinking Classrooms book.

I was impressed with the amount of whiteboard space she illustrates and mentioned it in the This Week in Ontario Edublogs show. She shares the “high tech” solution is a Twitter message.


The 500 – #350 – Roger The Engineer – Yardbirds

I’m following with great interest Marc Hodgkinson’s analysis of the top 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

I’ll admit that this one took my by surprise. Of course, I know of the Yardbirds – who doesn’t? I’d never heard of this album though or any of the songs on it.

Off on a tangent, I got curious as to when Eric Clapton left the Yardbirds and went down yet another rabbit whole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_Yardbirds_members This gives a complete listing of all of the members who ever where in the Yardbirds and notably identifies the big gap in their history.

This folks, is why I read blogs, to learn things.

And, I was wrong; I had heard one of the songs before – as Marc points out it was the song in the Chevrolet Cobalt commercial. I owned one of them and it was a great car.

Thanks, Marc for the lesson.


#ThinkingClassroom Question Prompts Graphic

Weren’t we just talking about Laura Wheeler? Why yes, we were in Amy Bowker’s post above.

Laura answered this prompt

In August Kristen Huang mentioned on Twitter that it would be useful to have a phone-friendly graphic of the 10 Things to Say in Response to a Proximity or Stop-Thinking Question from Peter Liljedahl‘s Building Thinking Classrooms book.

with a graphic!

Here’s a bit of it

You’ll have to go to Laura’s blog post to see the entire graphic and she makes the original graphic freely available to download.

She suggests using it as a screen lock image for your phone. What a great concept and a nice solution.

It may well open your mind to other ways that you could use that lock screen in your classroom.


Slice of Life: Candles

It wouldn’t be fair to have a couple of Slice of Life posts without bringing Lisa Corbett into the picture.

For her, it was all about burning candles while she’s at home with sick kids and “disinfecting and sanitizing” her whole house. What a job!

She shares a good story about a candle that she wasn’t particularly fond of and obviously the feeling was mutual after it blew up on her!

It’s now out of her life along with the horse that it rode in on!

“Be gone!”


Please take the time to click through and enjoy these wonderful blog posts.

Then, make sure that you’re following these bloggers on Twitter.

  • Elizabeth Lyons – @mrslyonslibrary
  • Melanie White – @WhiteRoomRadio
  • Jessica Outram – @jessicaoutram
  • Amy Bowker – @amyebowker
  • Marc Hodgkinson – @Mr_H_Teacher
  • Laura Wheeler – @wheeler_laura
  • Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261

I’m always on the lookout for great new blogs written by Ontario Educators. Please reach out if you know of one that I don’t.

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


After a week away from the blogging keyboard, it was nice to get back and see what was new from the blogs of Ontario Edubloggers. And, it was great to get back to voicEd Radio and discuss five of the posts with Stephen Hurley on Wednesday morning. Most people would be working with students at the time and so the show is stored as a podcast on the site.


3 things

Writing on the ETFO Heart and Art Blog, Will Gourley gives us a look at hybrid teaching from his perspective working in that environment. He shares with us three things about hybrid teaching.

  • Hybrid teaching sucks
  • Your students have something to tell you
  • Did I mention that hybrid still sucks?

I think you can get his perspective just by reading the first and third point. It would be easy, I suspect, for anyone to easily draw those conclusions. What lends to the credibility though is that he’s writing in the first person. He shares his setup and concerns about how to ensure that all students succeed. He also gets us into the gear that he has to wear and use in order to make it all happen. I think you’ll find yourself immersed in his world.

Just picture him…

“week with a mic on my head, a mask over my face, and webcam on”

It’s the middle point that I think speaks volumes for educators and shows us the type of educator that Will is. In a blog post that could easily just be Will ranting about how hybrid teaching sucks, he does take the time to ensure that we know that he’s not alone. The kids have a voice too and it’s important that it’s heard.

It’s easy to find stories about the challenges that teachers are facing. The voices of students and parents are always difficult to find and that’s a shame. Is it good for them or do they just not have a platform to make their thoughts heard?

While looking for thoughts, it would be good also to hear from administrators and members of the board of trustees who approved this mode of teaching.


Hybrid Learning Lessons

I had originally selected the post “Reflection: Keep it! Tweak it! Ditch it!” from Jennifer Casa-Todd’s blog to feature this week. When I returned to revisit it, I found this one instead and went with it. I thought it tagged nicely onto Will’s post. Will writes from the elementary classroom and Jennifer from secondary.

Will uses the term “exhausted” and Jennifer uses “November-level exhausted”. They’re both throwing all they’ve got into their teaching.

Jennifer gives us a summary of the technology that she uses in her teaching – “Screencastify, Choice Boards, Hyperdocs, Flipgrid, Station Rotation”.

Last week, she was a panelist on The Mentoree and shared a couple of really important points that I think all could ponder about and perhaps redirect their energies.

  • Fewer is better in terms of tech tools – this is always good advice but even more important these days, especially when you factor in the hybrid model. It’s easy to confuse more tools with more learning but for most classes that’s not the case. Finding a good multi-purpose tool and getting the most from it will get the most from technology. On the voicEd show, Stephen and I professed our love for Hyperstudio but alas …
  • Find a Professional Learning Network (PLN) on Twitter – of course, I flipped over this concept. Connecting with other educators is always a way to push yourself and learn new approaches. It’s also a place to go to recognize that you’re not the only one in the world facing challenges

Salvaging Old Lessons for New Students

Speaking of Hyperstudio – what the heck, let’s throw in Clarisworks as well…

Diana Maliszewski shares a story of collaboration with a new, young teacher looking to up her game. What to do? What to do?

I think most educators are like this. We’ve put a lot of time and effort into developing the perfect or pretty good lesson and are hesitant to throw it away. So, we just keep collecting them.

Diana turns back the resources dial a few years and remembers some great lessons from the past – the unfortunate part was that they were done in Hyperstudio and Clarisworks. Stop for a second and thing about how you’d even open documents created in those formats these days. To support Diana’s desire to get at them, she and her husband went on a search to find tools. And they did apparently find a solution.

I did smile a bit when she complained about the block graphics from days gone by especially since Diana is a big Minecrafter … but she does give us a look at the past and the freshly updated future resource.

The lesson that she resurrects is about phishing – now there’s a topic that will probably always be timely and can be just as important. Way to go, Diana.


The Important Question

Haven’t we all been in settings where we’re talking about or listening to others and the topic is “schools of the future”. It’s a popular topic and a reminder that there are always new things on the horizon for us to embrace.

Typically, we smile and nod and call ourselves and our profession as “life long learning”.

Anne-Marie Kees turns the tables with this question instead.

I also love this question:  What’s not going to change?

My first thought was bureaucracy since it’s such an easy topic to take shots at in education.

She had a more important focus though and that was relationships. I really enjoyed the way that she analysed this. There is a great deal to think about in her analysis.

It’s especially important since the whole notion of relationships has changed for all of us, including students, over the past while. How can we get back to being humans with our need to connect? How do we make sure that nobody gets left behind?

Here’s a reminder.


No WIFI…. No Worries

In Thames Valley, they recently had a professional development day. Sue Bruyns shares with us how the message to be delivered worked its way into each school for the event.

There was one thing that didn’t work its way though – WIFI!

Haven’t we all been there? You’re in the audience at a conference, or even worse, you’re getting ready to present and something goes wrong. Data projector blows up, electricity goes out, fire alarm goes off, or gasp, the internet gives up on you.

Such was the start fo the day for Sue Bruyns.

I’ve been in sessions where the presenter just gives up and tells us to do something else instead because their show can’t go on. They had no Plan B.

It sounds like the district didn’t have a Plan B either but Sue and her team looked around the building and created one on the fly! It’s a great story of recovery. Check out her complete post to find out what it was.


My List of Wishes

I just had to include this post from Aviva Dunsiger. After all, I guess I inspired her to write it.

Last Saturday, I went on an uncharacteristic rant about things that I hate in my world mostly attributed to the effects of COVID.

Aviva decided to take the concept and run with it.

These wishes might largely remain as wishes, and yet, somehow it feels cathartic to write them down and put them out in the world. What wishes might you add to this list? I wonder if framing them as wishes helps me believe in future possibilities. What about you?

It’s quite a long list and I suspect that many educators will empathise with Aviva and her perspective.

It might even ultimately turn into a “to-do” list when the conditions that she’s working on are lifted and things return to normal or to what the new normal will be.

The post is delightfully documented with pictures from her teaching world.

It did bring up another issue for me; I hate how Instagram resizes/crops images that you send it.


Loom Beading, Métis Finger Weaving, and LYNXcoding.club

Hot off the presses from Peter Skillen’s Construction Zone blog is this post in honour of the National Day of Truth and Reconcillation Day on September 30.

It’s a wonderful amalgam of mathematics, coding, problem solving, beading, weaving, and once again shows that you can integrate so many things when you see the big picture.

I’m not sure that I can do Peter’s post justice in my typical summary of a post so I will really encourage you to click through and enjoy the entire post.

It’s well documented with images and respect for culture and there’s so much there for everyone whether you decide to code a solution or not (but you really should – it works in your browser)

The question shouldn’t be “when will we ever need this stuff?”; it should be “patterning and construction predate us; we’re just catching up, learning from people who have been doing this for years”.

Well done, Peter. This truly is an activity with lots of legs to it.


Please click through and enjoy all of these excellent blog post from Ontario Edubloggers.

Then, follow them on Twitter.

  • Will Gourley – @WillGourley
  • Jennifer Casa-Todd – @JCasaTodd
  • Diana Maliszewski – @MzMollyTL
  • Anne-Marie Kee – @AMKeeLCS
  • Sue Bruyns – @sbruyns
  • Aviva Dunsiger – @avivaloca
  • Peter Skillen – @peterskillen

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


Paul McGuire guest hosted the voicEd Radio show this week. To the conversation, he added a blog post, insights as an educator, Principal, and Faculty Advisor, and a couple of songs in his new role as an Old Fellas, New Music blogger.


Feeling our Pain

We started the show with this post from Paul’s blog. Reading it may well be the best thing that you can do for yourself today.

Paul was very open and insightful with some of the challenges that people have in education at times, amplified during COVID times with anxiety and depression. There was a great deal of inspiration for how to cope at these times. As schools reopen in September, you just know that there will be more.

Paul’s done his research and shares some external excerpts to support his post. The biggest takeaway might well be being fully aware – of that colleague in the corner, that little girl in the second row, or that face you see in the mirror.

He asks “Could this be a dialogue?” Absolutely – it always should have been and if we need to lean on COVID as the motivator, do it.


Slice of Life: Not ready

When I read the title to this post from Lisa Corbett, I expected a fun article outlining the nerves that teachers have as they prepare for September. Goodness knows that I had them every year.

The inspiration here though was from a child’s birthday and a thunderstorm. Lisa had friends over, presumably to have the party in the backyard but that was only a plan. The lightning scuttled it.

Instead, the kids came inside and kids are kids. Loud and very active and this was an experience that Lisa hadn’t had for a long time. Paul pulled this quote from her post.

It’s the whole “dealing with other humans who don’t live with me” thing that has me feeling like hiding in the basement instead.

Premonition? Throw in a “close talker” or two and we can understand why she’s not ready.


It’s August Already

It was great to see Matthew Morris back at the keyboard and blogging again.

This time, he’s noting how July flew by. I’ve called this the month that the Minister stole from the system by promising “the plan” only to have it arrive in August.

Again, Paul pulled an interesting quote from this post.

I’m ready for August but not ready for much beyond that. That makes me queasy. The more I try to decompress the more I tighten up. I’m not used to this. I’m used to thinking; about school, and plans, and predictions. But this shit right here is brand new to me.

August isn’t really a good time for the conscientious educator at the best of times but this year is a totally new experience. Anxiety is higher than ever and Matthew throws in something I hadn’t thought about – being out of school for so long, he’s afraid that he might not recognize the students.

The big saviour will be that first day of school. Once those bodies arrive, teaching kicks in despite all of the other things that are happening. Teachers will be dealing with a new environment to be sure, but that’s been expected all along.


In Search of Creativity in Education

I won’t quote all that Paul pulled from Dave Cormier’s post. You’ll have to click through and read it all. It is worth the click.

Dave’s been asked by the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation – CERI to develop a curriculum piece that he’s calling Creating Creativity in the Online Classroom. Think about that for a second – it seems so counter-intuitive to be but Ontario Educators have been doing action research on this since the first lockdown.

We know that the talking head at the podium doesn’t work in the face to face classroom or at conferences and the windowed version of teaching online sure doesn’t work either. Teachers have been imagining all kinds of ways to engage students despite the conditions.

Dave equates creativity with fun and it’s easy to see how that connection can be made face to face. Online is a whole different ball game.

I think that this is huge job but Dave is an excellent choice as he seems to like to think about things like this. I’ve been a fan of his work for a long time now.

He’s identified these issues going into this.

  • The nature of creativity and the balance between a teacher’s sense of creativity and different sense of it in different students
  • The relationship between ill-defined problems and the kind of engagement that leads to the fostering of creativity
  • The challenges and opportunities of doing creativity with access to such an abundance of influences.

This is one to follow. It’s something that the Ministry and/or subject organizations should be following and seriously buying into.


The Truths About Self-Regulation & Maths

Tina Bergman inspired me to write an entire “fun” post about mathematics yesterday. (Click back if you’re interested)

In the post, Tina analyses a piece of work (Chapter 7 from Reframed). In particular, these five steps:

  • Step 1 Asking Why (History) Recognizing Stressors
  • Step 2 Reframing the Anxiety
  • Step 3: Aware of the Why and THAT
  • Step 4:Reducing the Stress
  • Step 5: Developing Pre and Post Strategies to Restore Blue/Red Brain Balance

I thought it was a good discussion and she’s really thought this through.

Personally, I’ve always enjoyed mathematics and saw it more like a series of puzzles instead of a curriculum. In the way of good puzzles, I understood that I couldn’t solve them all and learned to be good with not getting 100%. I found myself actively nodding when she talked about “play”.

We live in a different world with all the pressure put on teachers and students by the curriculum and schools and a community that isn’t hesitant to speak about their own challenges with mathematics.


A Journey: Student to Teacher & What Lies Beneath

This was an interesting post from Heather Lye about her personal philosophy and trek from, as she says, “Student to Teacher”.

Reading the post was a wonderful reminder of how teaching is truly a higher calling for those who enter and wish to be the best educator they can. In Heather’s case, she respects her own teachers

I’ve had many great teachers in my past that have impacted my decisions – I cannot wait to make them proud.

The post covers her personal thoughts about:

  • Care
  • Respect
  • Trust
  • Integrity

Use the post to see her thoughts and maybe inspire a refresher of your own reasons why you went into the profession.


THE YEAR TEACHING AND LEARNING CHANGED

I think that this post from Bei Zhang writing on the TESLOntario blog closes off this week’s collections of posts so nicely.

  • Fears Are Okay
  • Challenges Push Us to Move Forward

These two major points and subsequent thoughts are a reminder than it’s normal to feel the way that you do and secondly, this is why educators didn’t pack up everything and check out. Instead, they dug in and made the best happen.

All teachers (and students) have had to endure challenges and huge learning just to get connected and make it work at times. Bei throws kudos to the ESL teachers and students for their efforts.


Please take the time to click through and read all these terrific blog posts. Then, follow these bloggers on Twitter.

  • Paul McGuire – @mcguirp
  • Lisa Corbett – @LisaCorbett0261
  • Matthew Morris – @callmemrmorris
  • Dave Cormier – @davecormier
  • Tina Bergman – @blyschuk
  • Heather Lye – @MsHLye

This week’s voicEd Radio show:

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


On Wednesday, Brad Hughes was the guest host of the This Week in Ontario Edublogs show. It was great having him as part of the discussion. He brought a principal’s perspective to much of the conversation.


Mathematics Doesn’t Get a Pass on Racial Justice Reform

If you read one blog post about the post/yank/delete/repost issue with the new Mathematics Grade 9 curriculum, it’s this one from Jason To.

In the post, he researches and shares the critical educational issue behind the issue and does share a Toronto-centric map to support his message from the Ontario Science Table. I found it fascinating to explore, given my limited understanding of Toronto from my one year of living there.

I found his analysis very thoughtful and I left this post just a bit smarter. And angrier.

The anger comes from his research into the media response which preceded the pulling and editing of the document.

OAME released this statement on the issue


The Grey Zone: The importance of empathy & evidence in learning about colonial genocide

Discomfort is a theme that runs through this latest post from Charles Pascal.

We are seeing many extreme measures on all fronts over current issues falling from the discovery of bodies of Indigenous children. Unless you are completely void of compassion, it’s so tough to read about this and broadcast media certainly has put faces to the pain which amplifies the message.

Charles does give a good analysis of what he’s seeing on a regular basis.

He offers advice which is always good and even more important now than ever.

Listen

I will continue to try to follow my own advice hoping more and more people will feel more comfortable in that uncomfortable grey zone where respectful listening is more common.


How Do You “Lead?” Unpacking My #OneWordX12 For July.

Aviva Dunsiger has followed Beth Lyon’s lead and, instead of a one word for the year, has opted for a one word for each month. It keeps blog readers busy at least once a month reading it.

So, for July the word is “Lead”.

It’s an interesting word and inspired by her summer work at Camp Power. I smile when I hear the word; education has so many books about leadership. I still have a few on my bookshelf here. Being a Chrysler type of town, we’ve heard Lee Iacocca talk about leadership using Patton’s phrase “Lead, Follow, or Get Out Of My Way”.

Leadership, I suspect, means different things to different people. There are people who rise in leadership positions but somehow lose the spark. There are others that don’t aspire to rise within their organization and yet inspire all the time with their actions.

Aviva gives a nod to a former principal and provides a number of thoughts near the end. The one that inspires me and should be the root of all things in education.

Kids are always worth fighting for


Getting Past a Gatekeeper

I struggled with whether or not to include this post from Noa Daniel in this post. It’s overly personal and describes what would be a low point in her professional career.

But, I did decide to include it. My rationale was that it was obviously important for Noa to put her thoughts to words and a blog is a platform for all kinds of people to land and read. So here we are.

I won’t dwell on Noa’s personal story. You can click through and read if you’re so inclined. I’m intrigued with her message of principal being a gatekeeper, allowing those in their school the opportunity to move forward or to keep them behind.

It would be nice if we could live with the Dyer quote that Noa includes.

If you do worry, you can drive yourself crazy. So often, opinions can be driven by first impressions or pre-conceived thoughts from others and can be difficult to change.

Where does that leave you?

You can wake up every morning hoping that the world has changed but that’s highly unlikely. Ultimately, you need to be true to yourself. You can hope that the gatekeeper moves on or you can make your own move and get on with your life.


Once you’re a dad…

Writing on his own blog, Will Gourley writes a blog post describing the joys and challenges of being a father.

It’s a powerful post and I think that all fathers will be nodding along as they read it. Then, he replies to his post in the form of a letter to his son.

I particularly like the comparison of fatherhood today to the fatherhood that our fathers had. It was completely different; there was no self help books, social media advice, or YouTube videos about how to do this or that. It was just our fathers doing what they thought best. And taking no guff!

And it’s not a bad thing.

All of us fathers hope we do the best. You see the results when your kids strike out on their own and make their own success. Yet, it all comes back to home when they return and immediately go to the cookie cupboard.


Teacher Professional Development Podcasts

I loved reading this post from Kristy and I couldn’t find her last name. Her Twitter handle will be listed below.

I totally agree with the essence of her message. I’ve been to many professional development sessions where the topic chosen was something from a presenter’s catalogue and may or may not have been updated to reflect the current world.

With podcasts, you don’t have the costs or travel to sit and listen. When you chose wisely, the content can be as up to date as this morning and you can listen while walking the dog, writing a blog post, or just lying back on your bed. It’s personal learning at its best.

Kristy provides a list of podcasts, by subject area, that lets you immediately increase your ability to learn. Of particular interest for the summer, you might be interested in the Teacher Emotional Support section.


Luca: The Importance of Seeing Fully

I’ve been a fan of Pixar works.

According to Anthony Perrotta, it started with Toy Story and here we are today with Luca. I’ll confess that I haven’t seen Luca yet. Toy Story, many times – the DVD was a Christmas gift…

This could have been a quick and easy post to read but it isn’t. It’s actually a very complete lesson to you, dear reader, about media literacy and what you could be and should be seeing. There’s a tie to current events and how we need to be doing a better job of understanding.

There’s also a nice link to a PDF download of activities.


I hope that you can take the time to read and appreciate the wisdom in these posts.

Then, follow them on Twitter.

  • @brad_hughes
  • @Jason_To
  • @CEPascal
  • @avivaloca
  • @iamnoadaniel
  • @WillGourley
  • @2peasandadog
  • @aperrottatweet

This Week in Ontario Edublogs is live Wednesday mornings at 8:45. This week’s show is found here.