Upping your game


I’ll start off my saying that I’m not fond of templates, especially in education.

I’ve sat through many presentations where I know that I’ve seen the template that the presenter is using. Basically, they’ve downloaded a template and clicked in the placement text to add their own text, save it, and call it a presentation. At least, change the colours!

So, there’s my opening rant.

This week, my Windows computer let me know that there was an update available so I told it to go for it. That, before I read that some people were having issues with the upgrade … My upgrade went smoothly and quickly. As always, after the upgrade, I turned the computer off and then back on again. I know … old school mentality … there was a time when that was always required so superstitiously, I went for it. Things look nice, including the new Start Menu, the colours, etc. that I’d been reading about.

Maybe it was because it was cold outside, maybe it was the fact that I was just bored but this time, I actually click on and read the “See what’s new in this update” link. I did some exploration, but it was this one that really caught my attention and sent me down the wormhole.

That wormhole ultimately led me to this page:

https://templates.office.com/en-us/animation-and-3d

I was intrigued and played around with some of the templates.

Now, of course, you could just click the default text and make it yours. For me, though, I wondered about the possibilities that could come from messing around and seeing just how the templates were created. I could use those skills for myself.

In these days of more time spent working with schoolwork digitally, there is an increase in online presentation as part of the coursework.

This collection, properly used, could really make things pop in the hands of a creative teacher or student.

OTR Links 11/19/2020


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.