Your own countdown

And just like that, it’s December…

Growing up, my brother and I always had Advent calendars and the first of December was special since we could pop open the first of the windows and get at the chocolate surprise. But only one per day.

It was a popular item on sale at various retail stores we visited recently. And, go online and wow! It’s the ultimate consumer item. It’s not just limited to chocolate anymore.

For the classroom, what about turning it around and make it the ultimate making item! Why not make your own Advent calendar? Maybe not the chocolate type but how about something digital?

MyAdvent is an online resource to help out.

Instead of chocolate, you could add just about anything – text, images, Flipgrid, and video and document anything. Depending upon the start of the Break, you could have up to 20? days to do the deed. ## days of Geometry anyone, ## days of going Green, ## days of sketchnotes, …

Not interested in using an online service?

The concept is easily replicable on blog, online presentation/document/spreadsheet, wiki, …

What a beautiful way to countdown until the break.

In other Advent news, check out Lisa Noble’s weekly update.

Author: dougpete

The content of this blog is generated by whatever strikes my fancy at any given point. It might be computers, weather, political, or something else in nature. I experiment and comment a lot on things so don't take anything here too seriously; I might change my mind a day later but what you read is my thought and opinion at the time I wrote it! My personal website is at: http://www.dougpeterson.ca Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dougpete I'm bookmarking things at: http://www.diigo.com/user/dougpete

4 thoughts on “Your own countdown”

  1. Doug, I have such conflicting thoughts on these countdowns. On one hand, I kind of love the online countdown option, or even the idea of making an Advent Calendar together. On the other hand, I worry about countdowns and the stress that they might cause kids. Not everyone is looking forward to the holidays. We often think about this at the end of the year, but the same holds true for the holidays. I don’t think this means ignoring the fact that the holidays are coming, but just knowing our kids and being cognizant of any behaviour we may see, could be important.

    Aviva

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  2. thanks so much for including our reverse Advent calendar here. I’m struggling this year even with that, for some of the reasons Aviva mentions above. I’m thinking maybe I switch it to a different time of year, when everyone’s not giving to charitable organizations, and we just do a month of giving/gratitude. I have seen some terrific activities designed to be used over a month – days of caring/kindness, etc., and I’m really starting to think about why we need to give the impression that the only time we need to work on this is December. Why not do 40 of them through Ramadan, or Lent? My husband and I had some good conversations today around cultural appropriation, and the fact that Advent calendars are simply accepted as a secular thing – but really, they’re not….. Lots to think about.

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