When games were good


That should open up room for argument!

Recently, I had a chat with a teacher who complained that the computer setup at her school was essentially a multi-plex movie theatre with every student having their own screen watching YouTube video!

I one-upped her by recalling the good old days.  My computer lab was actually an arcade.  During lunch, before and after school, of course.  Students were allowed to use the computers and there were a few games that we available for play.  Hang in there; there’s a good educational story to come.

But first, big news from the Internet Archive

Another few thousand DOS Games are playable at the Internet Archive! Since our initial announcement in 2015, we’ve added occasional new games here and there to the collection, but this will be our biggest update yet, ranging from tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago.

I had to click on over and see what was there.

Holy smokes!  What a huge collection!  So huge, in fact, that there were so many titles that I had never heard of.  Truthfully, most of them!

Of course, I had to try a couple of them out.  They run directly from the website in a DOS box right in your browser.  Here’s a classic!

Screenshot 2019-10-16 at 11.18.42

Who hasn’t played around the The Incredible Machine.  You can now relive your inner Rube Goldberg!

Now, the educational part.  While the original games had initial appeal for Computer Science students, the win came when they had the desire to write games of their own to try to out-do the commercial products.

The standard curriculum used smaller, simpler programs to write because students were learning the programming concepts.  As any Computer Science teacher will affirm, they aren’t always the most exciting or motivating thing to write.  But, turn students on to writing games that they can actually play or challenge friends with and they catch on fire.  They’ll research and learn new techniques; research parts of the language that they need to make something happen; and consider the person who’s actually going to play the game.  Bottom line, they’ll go much further on their own than you would ever hope to see in the regular class.

Admittedly, current technology is far more sophisticated than these games but they’re still enjoyable.

It’s a nice reminder that we all started somewhere.

OTR Links 10/17/2019


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.