This Week in Ontario Edublogs


After a short hiatus, the voicEd Radio version of TWIOE was back on the air again this past Wednesday. I feared that I might need to be retrained but it was all good. It was great to have guest host Terry Greene on to share his thoughts.


What’s With All The Sharing?

Terry had recently written this post to his blog so, fortunately, we could talk about his writing with him “in the house”. The article was about a short webinar that he had given talking about three things that he’s been involved with.

  • Open Patchbooks
  • His podcast Gettin’ Air
  • Ontario Extend

Fortunately, he’s shared his slide deck for us to follow. The link is below.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1kUWmoGuyjo2fPUSkpQI0pj9_2nzgDwy2Bw4U6EKAj20/edit?usp=sharing

He brought in a discussion about zombies and mountains – you’d got to read it and leaves us with this advice.

You can leave pieces of mountain all over the place via blog post


Interviewing My Domain

During the show, we had a chance to talk to Terry about some of the writing done by members of the Ontario Extend initiative and the first one came from Irene Stewart.

Irene interviews her domain for this post. What an interesting premise. Part of the Ontario Extend project was registering and developing a domain. So, this coffee drinker went this route.

It’s an interesting interview. I enjoyed it and learn a bit more about how she feels about the concept. I think many of us have our own domains; I know that mine redirects to a Google Site. I used to develop it on my own server but found that doing updates for security got a bit tedious and so my approach is to have the name as a portal to the things that I’m doing. Irene does the same thing.

While owning one’s domain is a smart thing to do, I always wonder about those who let their domain go stale and perhaps not apply updates. It’s easy enough to get hacked if that’s the case. Plus, you also need to make sure that you re-register so that someone doesn’t nip in and hijack your domain because you neglected it.

It’s more of a concern to serious and popular domains; I can’t imagine anyone wanting to hijack mine.


So Why SoTL?

On of the Ontario Extends activities was to get involved with SoTL. It was something that was new to me and Terry shared this link. A short video helps with the explanation.

Jessica O’Reilly uses this post to reflect upon her own approach to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Right from the first time I found myself in front of a classroom, I knew I needed to conduct research in education. Teaching and learning are incredibly complex activities, and as a twenty-something TA flung in front of a group of undergraduates, I was acutely aware of how little I knew about all of it.

If you’re an educator, chances are you’re nodding in agreement with her statement. What did you do about it?

Jessica is turning her concerns into a doctorate at Athabasca.

How’s that for commitment?

As an aside, Jessica brought back a term that I hadn’t heard in years – SCORM.


Social Media- What is it good for?

Well, Beth Lyons, that’s a million dollar question.

In fact, if there are a million people asked that question, you might get a million different answers. One topic that has been the focus of this discussion this summer is the concept of an #educelebrity. I shared my thoughts about it recently on this blog and Beth shares hers in this post.

She takes a reasoned approach and I found myself agreeing with her on so many of the points she makes.

She does identify a personal call to action that’s good advice for everyone.

  • Becoming intentional about who she follows
  • Make a list of what she can control and what she can’t
  • Question those she follows

It’s a much better approach than getting into a war of words over topics because, after all,


Day 3: Relax

Teachers have it so easy. Two months off.

It’s a time to relax but this post from Lisa Corbett describes a summer life that’s anything but.

Before I had children I was really good at relaxing

Could we agree that perhaps relaxing in the eyes of a teacher is just a different type of hectic? Except that you have better control of the timing of events throughout the day.

For many, the enjoyment of reading can be the relaxing activity that they crave and Lisa does indicates that she had a stack of summer reading. In the comments, it’s interesting to note that some of the reading includes professional reading.

I had to think of a Star Trek episode when Scotty chose technical manuals as a recreational activity!


A Lot More Good …

I don’t know about you but whenever I pass a police car or truck, I get this tightness in my chest and my eyes immediately drop to look at the speedometer of my vehicle hoping that I hadn’t exceeded the speed limit.

Certainly that’s part of their duties but this post from Aviva Dunsiger lets you know that there are other things too.

From her summer camp, one of the campers was destroyed that someone had stolen his and his mother’s bicycle. I know when I was that age, that was my primary form of transportation.

The camper wrote a letter to Hamilton-Wentworth police describing the bicycles. You just have to know that a teacher is involved. You also just have to know that Aviva would document it with social media.

But, you’ll have to read Aviva’s post to see how this unfortunate event ends.


Help! My child wants a YouTube channel

My son wanted one too and just went ahead and created it. He also contributed to channels for television shows that he worked on. My child is a big kid so he’s allowed to make decisions on his own.

What happens when they’re younger? That’s the focus of this post from Jennifer Casa-Todd. My first reaction was that the parent should be relieved that they got the question and that the child just didn’t go ahead without permission or guidance. After all, social media cred is important these days and YouTube can be that facilitator. Also, we need to recognize that in these days of privacy concerns and shows like Fail Army that people attempt to have the loudest voices and most outrageous content to try and get that cred.

That comes with all kinds of potential problems.

Jennifer does provide a thoughtful guide and approach that should focus the discussion to practical concerns and planning for a child looking to develop that channel. Like much Social Media, it can also suffer an early death if not maintained and interests turn to other things.


Please take some time to click through and read all of these wonderful posts from Ontario Edubloggers.

Then, make sure that you’re following them on Twitter.

  • @greeneterry
  • @IrenequStewart
  • @Cambrian_Jess
  • @LisaCorbett0261
  • @MrsLyonsLibrary
  • @avivaloca
  • @jcasatodd

This post is an original feature on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not original.

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OTR Links 08/16/2019


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.