Raptors’ media literacy

This was one of those moments when only a screen capture will do.

All during the final game between the Raptors and the Warriors, they commentators kept noting that this was the final game at the Oracle Arena.  I recognized the outside but I could have sworn that I knew it as another name.

So, the next morning, I decided to check it out.  Going online during the game didn’t seem right.  The first search results took me to the Wikipedia which seemed like a good crowd sourced solution to a relatively simple, straight forward question.

Here’s what I found…

Now, overlook the fact that their new arena has already been put in place.  Check out the ownership of the team.  It looks like some Raptors Wikipedia fans had been to work!  It’s time for a screen capture.

Now, had I known who the actual owners were, I could have immediately changed that myself.  A while later, after doing my research, I returned.

Some fact checker had been in and made the correction.  Whew!

But, would have happened if I’d been doing a research paper and hit the article at the wrong time.  Now, any NBA fan would have had red lights flashing immediately but what if you weren’t in that camp, er, court?  How’s that a case for fact checking?

Related to this on the topic of media literacy, check out this article from the CTV.

From California to Canada: A look at newspaper front pages day after Raptors historic win

Here you’ll find a very nice collection of screen captures from major newspapers from both Canada and the United States.  It’s an interesting study in how different people and publications can have a different take on how to report the same story.  And, it’s relevant.  For this week anyway.

There’s a couple of media related things for the week ahead!

Enjoy.

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3 thoughts on “Raptors’ media literacy

  1. I love this media connection, Doug! When we were making our Raptors’ Stadium in class, I bought some US and Canadian newspapers for images and slogans to use. Even our Kindergarteners noticed how the same story was reported differently. Imagine how much deeper older grades could go.

    Aviva

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