This Week in Ontario Edublogs


If you’re looking for some good reading, you’ve found it – a weekly roundup of some of the blog posts from Ontario Educators.


Mindless cuts to education puts our future at risk

Charles Pascal tagged me in this op-ed piece he wrote for the Wellington Times. He had me hooked at the first paragraph…

A growing number of Ontarians are being hurt—and our shared future placed at risk—by the moment by moment uninformed decision-making by the current government at Queen’s Park. Led by an unthinking premier and enabled by a spineless cabinet, we are in the midst of a very damaging period in our political history.

Charles’ passion for society and education come through loudly and clearly as he challenges many of the assumptions that the current government has made as it has been making the cuts that we seem to hear more and more about each day.

There is an important message that shouldn’t go unnoticed in all of this. It’s easy to see the impact of cuts on students in the classroom but Charles points out that a child’s life is more than just going to school. Cuts can have the impact at many other points.

Set aside some time to read and understand the important message he’s crafted in this article – and then pass it along to colleagues and friends.


Student Infographics

Who doesn’t like a good infographic? Using pictures and numbers, you can enhance any message or concept you want. We see them all over the place.

John Allan argues that they fit nicely into the ESL classroom in this post on the TESL Ontario blog. He identifies…

  • Critical thinking
  • Planning
  • Designing
  • Optimizing
  • Researching

as being seen in any well crafted infographic.

Who can argue with the case for any activity that incorporates this?

Think of any infographic that you’ve ever seen and I’m sure that you can easily identify these components. It’s really not a very big leap to designing a student activity.

And, John has you covered in the balance of the post with details and links to external resources to help the cause.

Language, mathematics, communications, impact, … what’s not to like?


It’s “time”

A title like that doesn’t tell you much about the content so I had to read the balance of Sean Monteith’s post to find out.

In education, time is such a precious commodity. When you think about it, it’s the one common element that everyone deals with whether it’s time allotted to a quiz, time spent on a bus, time to be spent on various subjects, time to do homework, time for sports, time for major projects, or even time to build a new secondary school!

In Keewatin Patricia, Sioux North Secondary School opened

Sean notes that he’s packed 10 years of work into the six years that he’s been at the district. Opening a new school is a pretty deal.

Check out the guest list.

And yet, in one day we will welcome the Minister of Education, the Deputy Minister and Assistant Deputies; Grand Chiefs and First Nation Leaders, nationally renowned artists, students, former Directors of Education and retired staff. We will welcome the former Premier of Ontario, and the former Minister of Education as well, and numerous politicians. I am particularly pleased that Tanya Talaga will be joining us; and of course our kids, the entire reason we ask ourselves what is our human obligation, to young people…yes, they will be there too

What an amazing group to have join the celebration!


Why Caring Adults Matter: An Ode To My Alma Mater

Stephen Hurley and I discussed this post from Martina Fasano during our radio show earlier this week. Stephen asked me if a particular teacher had stood out in my mind. I immediately thought of Mr. Cook but the moment that his name came out of my mouth, I thought of so many others.

Growing up and living in a small town has its advantages and certain disadvantages. There’s nothing like your parents getting in a lineup at the IGA next to one of your teachers. Or, meeting up with them at Kinsmen or Kinettes. There was no waiting until parent teacher night; feedback was everywhere!

In retrospect, I was lucky to have had the opportunity to be in their classes. I think that’s why I enjoyed Martina’s post so much. The faces and names may have been different but the personalities were much the same. It impacted her.

I could not help but think to myself that if I could be the caring adult for even a handful of students throughout my career, that I would have done a great job of being an educator.

You can’t help but think that sentiment would be a good message delivered at any Faculty of Education.


A Tale That Endures

Martina’s post leads so nicely into this one by Jennifer Aston. There most definitely is a learning environment angle for students but this is mostly about teacher to teacher.

Jennifer had a colleague pass on a collection of books upon her retirement with one provision – Jennifer had to use the books ever year. And she did. I love the way that she worked “admire” into the conversation about the colleague. From that, the respect necessary to follow through on her promise only made it that much easier.

Jennifer has a true passion for the profession; I had a wonderful and colourful conversation with her at EdCampLdn. There’s no question that she honours the profession and is constantly looking for the best resources to use.

More than just using the books, Jennifer passes on a list of ideas for how to use it in her classroom and, consequently, this wisdom is yours just by reading her post. What a wonderful way to pass things along!

Then, there’s the whole soup thing.


Can Kids Understand Equity?

That’s a good question, Aviva.

The question arose from an interaction from a student who was creating a Raptors stadium. (What else these days…are the Blue Jays even playing, what is it … baseball?)

With video, she answers her own question and I agree with her.

I wonder though, is the operative word in her title “equity” or is it “understand”. My feeling is that it’s probably true that kids notice how different students or situations happen at any age.

While they may notice, do they truly understand? I suppose that there comes an age and experience where they do. But, Aviva’s post, sadly has me thinking of those children in cages at the US/Mexico border. I’m sure they recognize the inequity; do they understand it though?


Happy #DLweekTO

I’ve never known Diana Maliszewski to be late with a Monday post but she was with this one!

When you read the post, I guess I have to cut her some slack. What a busy week for me.

In the middle of the post, she shares this Digital Literacy link from the TDSB.

Quite impressive, I must say.

But, back to Diana – how did she celebrate Digital Literacy Week?

  • TDSB Professional Library held its second TDSB Teachers Read event
  • Denise Colby and I had a return engagement on the VoicEd radio show “Mediacy” with Stephen Hurley TDSB Professional Library held its second TDSB Teachers Read event
  • Today (Wednesday, May 29) was the “reunion” for the Media Literacy AQ participants from TDSB. TDSB Professional Library held its second TDSB Teachers Read event
  • Tomorrow (Thursday, May 30) will be the 3rd anniversary of the #tdsbEd chat. I haven’t missed an anniversary celebration yet. TDSB Professional Library held its second TDSB Teachers Read event
  • On Friday, May 31, the seventh annual Red Maple Marketing Campaign will take place at the Malvern branch of the Toronto Public Library TDSB Professional Library held its second TDSB Teachers Read event

Of course, she breaks each of these out in detail well worth your reading. I guess we can cut her some of that slack for missing her Monday deadline.


Please take the time to click through and read each of these wonderful posts. You’ll be glad you did.

Then, make sure you’re following these folks on Twitter.

This post appears on:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you read it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

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OTR Links 06/07/2019


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.