This Week in Ontario Edublogs

Happy First Friday of 2019.

Please read and enjoy this selection from Ontario Edubloggers.


Chocolate by Trial and Error

Sheila Stewart writes a post that will bring out your inner Julia Child. It’s a real departure from her regular posts – the previous one was about Effective School Councils – but still an interesting read.

As we conclude the holidays, we might be looking back at the great (and sweet) treats from the past couple of weeks.

If you’re looking for something to bake this weekend, and you enjoy chocolate, Sheila shares her recipe for a Chocolate Mint Pie.


Hack the Classroom 2018

There are people’s favourite venues for showing off the latest and greatest things that kids can do. Unlike exhibitor sessions with professionals and pre-planned scripts, it’s always interesting to see what students can actually do when you give them the right tools.

As Zélia Capitão-Tavares notes …

WE need to create opportunities to immerse students within the Global Competencies to develop deep learning through experiences that integrate creativity, inquiry and entrepreneurship.

What leapt from this post as interesting, innovative, and true to Zélia’s premise above was a group of students developing games that students in the Deaf & Hard of Hearing classes could enjoy. The Micro:Bit was the tool of choice.

When you think about how much games depend upon background music and audio feedback to players, I’m sure that the students the games were designed for felt a great sense of being included.


The best present is one you can give year round

From the Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning Blog, Will Gourley shares an inspirational message for 2019.

Through the holiday season, there are charities and causes at every turn using the holiday season as inspiration for garnering support. Many try to get enough to sustain them through the upcoming year.

Although, traditional presents are nice, it has been my experience to savour the moments when we are able to strengthen our class community through quality time together. Long after the sweetness of a treat or period off for a movie has been forgotten, students remember being part of something special that benefitted others.

So, what would be the “something special”?

Read the post to get some ideas and inspiration that are both timely and most definitely worthwhile and would be well appreciated.


Fill Your Own Cup With Gratitude

Before reading Ramona Meharg’s blog post, I might have offered February as being the toughest of months in education but she builds the case for November. The holiday-less month.

Through a series of events, you can’t help but show empathy for what she describes and it might well be that you are/were in the same case.

Ramona’s solution was to reach out to her Marigold for support.

and a cup of tea?

If you have experienced the same thing and can offer a solution or just to share a story, Ramona’s looking for it in her comments.


An Oscar-esque thank you speech type of blog post

Or, maybe you could make an Oscar type speech to appreciate those things that have gone right and those who have been so supportive like Melanie Lefebvre did.

The big message in this post is the “autonomy” that educators have. Sure, everyone has curriculum and standards and content and … that have to be covered. That’s why we have courses and grades. But, the “how” of doing it honours the autonomy concept. That makes teaching the greatest of professions.

In the post, Melanie acknowledges …

  • Dean
  • JACS team?
  • IT Department
  • The Hub?
  • Health and Safety
  • Maintenance Team
  • Library
  • P and VP of Academics

as contributing to her success in the beginning of this new career for her.

It’s probably a good activity for all to do with a personal reflection that nobody can do it alone in education.

In typical Oscar fashion, after a while the music starts!


Making the Shift Toward Tracking Observations

Here’s advice from the bottom of the post from Heather Theijsmeijer …

This may feel like a lot of work, however keep in mind that not only does this process get easier over time (remember how much longer it took you to set a test when you first started teaching?), but the point of assessing observations is that it can replace a product-based assessment, on the road to triangulating sources of evidence. This is not meant to be done in addition to your current stack of marking. 

Hands up if you remember the days when final grades were calculated and assigned through three tests and a final examination.

That pretty much includes anyone who ever went through the school system 10-20 years ago and then to university. I still remember a picture from a university newspaper showing hundreds of students at desks in the gym writing final exams and the caption “Here, you’re just a number”.

How things have changed and we now focus on daily observations and progression towards understanding course expectations. In this post, Heather offers some suggestions, including a link to a previous post, as inspiration. Yes, there are brand names included but it shouldn’t take a huge leap to recognize that there are other products that you have access to that will have the same or better functionality.


Addition of double digit numbers

What if you threw a party and nobody came?

That was my first reaction when I read this post from Lisa Corbett.

She had her class all set and prepped to move along to number lines.

The best laid plans…

As I walked around I could see lots of kids with lots of right answers but no number lines. “How are they doing this??” I wondered. So I asked. And I was amazed! So many of them were using the mental math strategy of splitting. They thought about how many ones there were in each number, and how many tens were in each number, then they found a total.

I hope that she felt good that they had mastered their previous learning and felt confident enough to use it in this new situation.

So, what do you do?

To use a football analogy, you drop back 10 and punt.

You’ll have to click through to see Lisa’s professional judgement click in!


What a lovely collection of blog posts to finish off the Christmas Break. Please take the time to click through and enjoy them. And, drop off a comment or two if you’re so inspired.

If you’re an Ontario Edublogger and not on the Livebinder, please click through and add the link to your blog.

Then, follow the great bloggers references in this post.

This post appears at:

https://dougpete.wordpress.com

If you found it anywhere else, it’s not the original.

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One thought on “This Week in Ontario Edublogs

  1. Thanks for mixing in my chocolate post this week, Doug! While I was working out plan B in the kitchen that day, I did think of education and teaching! There I was with an “end goal” in mind (well, maybe just being stubborn), but I had to make adjustments based on what I knew about baking and I knew full well that there still might be the risk of a total flop in adapting the recipe the way I did. At some point, I thought: Are teachers and students allowed and trusted to “mess” around and adapt their plans and decisions like this often enough? Do we model the same in parenting enough?

    It was also just a fun and silly post to write on the holidays 🙂

    Happy New Year start up in the TWIOE series!

    Liked by 1 person

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