My Week Ending August 26, 2018


Here’s a summary of some of the things I learned and published this week.


Readings (You can follow my daily readings as they happen here.  Here are a selected few from the past week.)

  • Google is famous (or is that infamous) for deleting applications.  This time, it’s Google Goggles.  I remember being somewhere with Peter Beens and I had an app that was dedicated to reading QR codes.  He convinced me to delete it and use Googles to do the same thing and a whole lot more.  I really did like it.
  • I never thought of a phone as being a powerful computing device and never thought that I’d ever own a personal one or use it for computing.  I was totally wrong.  Now, a folding phone?  I will withhold any comment now until I see it.
  • Why not use them all?  I have a specific type of file that I’ll store in Google Drive, another for Dropbox, and another for OneDrive.
  • This was definitely the most retweeted article that I shared this past week.  Teacher-Librarians should all read it.  To repurpose a quote “Libraries as a subversive activity”.
  • I doubt that I’d ever move back to Toronto but I’d certainly visit to see if this vision for Quayside comes true.
  • Again, from Toronto, this is genius.  It’s all about using Twitter to write a book – one tweet at a time.  It’s certainly not a stretch to see it being a classroom activity.
  • Nunavut faces challenges getting teachers.  For the new teacher looking for something more reliable than the occasional teaching list, this could be a real experience for creating yourself as a well-rounded teacher.  And, budgeter.  Things are expensive.
  • I think that it’s a shame that school systems have dropped these things.  In a way, vocational schools have it all over regular schools in terms of producing graduates with experience in these areas. So, of course, let’s close vocational schools.
  • I’m a sucker for anything that says “Teacher Hacks”.  There are really good ideas here.
  • It’s an easy title to write.  Of course, Ford is looking for a fight with teachers.  After all, they’ve supported Liberals and NDP for years.  I think he’d be far more successful, if it’s success that he wants, to take lessons from Bill Davis rather than Mike Harris.
  • This is a very comprehensive set of resources from Concordia University for staff to use around indigenous studies, nicely categorized by topic.  Shouldn’t all school districts do the same?Concordia

Blog Posts on doug … off the record

Blog Post on ecoo.org

BRING IT, TOGETHER 2018 – The complete schedule is now live.  Have you registered?  It’s also a reminder of the “Bring IT, Together” concept.  Why not bring a group from your school?


voicEd Radio

My on demand page can be found here.  The latest edition features blog posts from:


Technology Trouble Shooting 

Last week, I shared the problem that I was having with my Trackpad on my MacBook Pro.  I actually tried a couple more things and I think I have resolved my problem.  Either than or shortened its useful life.

I’m generally very careful with my browser.  I use Opera wherever I can because it’s easy on battery life.  But, one of the things I did to perhaps dry an area inside that I didn’t get with the compressed air – I ran the Vivaldi browser (which can be hard on resources) with a whole bunch of tabs open doing interactive things.  Then, I opened iTunes and did some stuff, and then I rendered some stuff into a movie.  My MacBook Pro was really hot.  The fan was going nuts.

I also killed the Dock process with the command…

$ killall Dock

Then, I turned off the computer and let it cool down.  Upon reboot, everything seems to be running well.  Which worked?  I honestly don’t know.


Video of the Week

How do you execute a command line instruction in OS X so that you could kill the Dock?  And, actually do a whole lot more good things.


My Favourite Photo of the Week

My wife and I enjoyed a coffee in the King’s Navy Yard park.  It a great spot to watch dog walkers, people walkers, boaters, and the ferry going over to Boblo Island.  Amazingly, there came a time when there was nothing in my frontal view site so, naturally, I took a picture.

You can see, if you look closely, the tower from a ride when there was an amusement park on the island, the apartment condos, and the lighthouse tower that the ferry aims for when you’re crossing.

This is the south part of the island which is pretty much left alone.  To the right, you’ll find all the nice new homes.  The public boat dock and restaurant are on the other side of the island.

boblo

Thanks for reading.

dp

Whatever happened to …


… those summer jobs?

Last week, it was fun to think about the summer job of running a lemonade stand.  But, it did get me thinking.

We hear so often about how technology is going to remove jobs from society.  It’s certainly an important concern for adults.  But, how about for kids?

I started thinking about some summer jobs that I had as a kid that may well be not available for today’s kids.

Picking Stones

This truly was hard work.  There was a local farmer who had a field where somehow large stones managed to work their way to the surface every spring.  How do you deal with it?  Certainly, it had to be done before getting on the field planting because big stones could damage the plough.  Solution?  Hire kids to follow a wagon around the field picking up stones as you find them.  I recall that there were also some big ones that needed two or three people to lift them.  Then, once the wagon was full, we got a free ride to the “stone pile” where we unloaded them.  Today, there’s a device known as a stone picker that has replaced that back breaking job.

Picking Weeds

Same farmer.  It was probably a move to save money but towards the end of August, it wasn’t uncommon to not be able to see the white beans because they were overgrown by rag weed, chickory, thistles, and something called Queen’s Anne Lace.  We’d walk the rows, pulling, and laying the weeds down between the rows when we were done.  Picking the weeds was just part of the torture.  At the end of the day, your hands looked like you were wearing dirt gloves.  Cleaning them was not a quick and easy activity.  These days, of course, we know of weed killing chemicals that can be sprayed on fields and some seeds come already treated with weed killer.

Picking Cucumbers

This was truly back breaking work.  My dad had leased 1/4 acre and we planted cucumbers.  Work started early in the plant growth and it was important to train the cucumbers to grow in rows.  Their natural tendency is to grow in clumps.  We’d be out there to help them all grow in one direction.  Then, the cucumbers would grow!  Early in the picking process was painful because of the spikes that grow on cucumbers.  But, after a while, your hands would get covered in dirt that again, worked like gloves.  Picking was a routine – you’d roll the plant to the left and pick, to the right and pick, then place it down and dig through the centre for what you missed otherwise.

 

Photo Credit: mariasherow Flickr via Compfight cc

We’d put them in 11 quart baskets and relief was given when you got to take the basket to the big burlap bags and dump them.  That was the only time you could stand up.  Once done, we’d take the bags into the train station where Bick’s graded them from 1-6.  Ones were what we call gherkins in the pickle business.  They were very small but paid the most.  It took a lot of picking to get a significant amount.  Sixes were the great big ones that Bick’s would make into relish.  The sweet spot seemed to be threes and fours.  Your bag was dumped onto this big machine that shook them around, falling into the appropriate sizes.  These days, automation has made the process far less back breaking.  Instructions like this are nice for the home gardener.  They have no lure when you grow them by the acre.

Yep, I did a lot of picking as a kid!

Your thoughts, via comment, please.

  • Did you ever have any of the above jobs in your youth?
  • Did you have a job as you were growing up that no longer exists or has been replaced/modified by technology?
  • Do you like cucumbers?  To this date, I just can’t eat raw cucumbers.  Blech.  But, I do enjoy a good dill pickle.

This is part of a regular Sunday series of posts.  You can check them all out here.

Whatever happened to …


… those summer jobs?

Last week, it was fun to think about the summer job of running a lemonade stand. But, it did get me thinking.

We hear so often about how technology is going to remove jobs from society. It’s certainly an important concern for adults. But, how about for kids?

I started thinking about some summer jobs that I had as a kid that may well be not available for today’s kids.

Picking Stones

This truly was hard work. There was a local farmer who had a field where somehow large stones managed to work their way to the surface every spring. How do you deal with it? Certainly, it had to be done before getting on the field planting because big stones could damage the plough. Solution? Hire kids to follow a wagon around the field picking up stones as you find them. I recall that there were also some big ones that needed two or three people to lift them. Then, once the wagon was full, we got a free ride to the “stone pile” where we unloaded them. Today, there’s a device known as a stone picker that has replaced that back breaking job.

Picking Weeds

Same farmer. It was probably a move to save money but towards the end of August, it wasn’t uncommon to not be able to see the white beans because they were overgrown by rag weed, chickory, thistles, and something called Queen’s Anne Lace. We’d walk the rows, pulling, and laying the weeds down between the rows when we were done. Picking the weeds was just part of the torture. At the end of the day, your hands looked like you were wearing dirt gloves. Cleaning them was not a quick and easy activity. These days, of course, we know of weed killing chemicals that can be sprayed on fields and some seeds come already treated with weed killer.

Picking Cucumbers

This was truly back breaking work. My dad had leased 1/4 acre and we planted cucumbers. Work started early in the plant growth and it was important to train the cucumbers to grow in rows. Their natural tendency is to grow in clumps. We’d be out there to help them all grow in one direction. Then, the cucumbers would grow! Early in the picking process was painful because of the spikes that grow on cucumbers. But, after a while, your hands would get covered in dirt that again, worked like gloves. Picking was a routine – you’d roll the plant to the left and pick, to the right and pick, then place it down and dig through the centre for what you missed otherwise.

cucumber

Photo Credit: mariasherow Flickr via Compfight cc

We’d put them in 11 quart baskets and relief was given when you got to take the basket to the big burlap bags and dump them. That was the only time you could stand up. Once done, we’d take the bags into the train station where Bick’s graded them from 1-6. Ones were what we call gherkins in the pickle business. They were very small but paid the most. It took a lot of picking to get a significant amount. Sixes were the great big ones that Bick’s would make into relish. The sweet spot seemed to be threes and fours. Your bag was dumped onto this big machine that shook them around, falling into the appropriate sizes. These days, automation has made the process far less back breaking. Instructions like this are nice for the home gardener. They have no lure when you grow them by the acre.

Yep, I did a lot of picking as a kid!

Your thoughts, via comment, please.

  • Did you ever have any of the above jobs in your youth?
  • Did you have a job as you were growing up that no longer exists or has been replaced/modified by technology?
  • Do you like cucumbers? To this date, I just can’t eat raw cucumbers. Blech. But, I do enjoy a good dill pickle.

This is part of a regular Sunday series of posts. You can check them all out here.

OTR Links 08/26/2018


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.