My Week Ending July 8, 2018


Here’s a summary of some of the things I learned and published this week.


Readings (You can follow my daily readings as they happen here.  Here are a selected few from the past week.)

  • This is an interesting post about the Epic browser.  What I found interesting was the discussion about how the various browsers are trying to differentiate themselves to stand out from the ground.  Yet, it doesn’t seem to matter; Chrome is still way out ahead.
  • Advertising blocking if more than just blocking advertising.  Especially with a slow internet connection, there are real advantages to blocking them.
  • Dictation is really a big deal.  The announcement here is that OneNote now supports the concept.
  • Teaching children to swim would save lives.  It’s hard to disagree with that but is teaching all students feasible?
  • A legal ruling out of Detroit about literacy will leave you with your head shaking.
  • Infographics remain a wonderful way to convey a message or report results on a topic.  This article will give you some ideas as to resources to use.
  • Python programming fans will appreciate this list debunking myths about using it as a programming language…especially for beginners.
  • Bad technology — a good list
  • There is no shortage of commentary about ISTE tracking its conference attendees.  Here’s one such sharing of thoughts.
  • Install or upgrade to Linux Mint 19 and then do these things.

Blog Posts on doug … off the record

Blog Post on ecoo.org

  • Plan Now for #BIT18 in November (I know I shared this previously but I’ll do it again here.  Please share it with your social network and those within your district, particularly those with PD money.  I’d like to meet as many people as possible this fall.  I also get to chair the ECOO Annual General Meeting.  After a year of doing the Board of Directors online, it will be nice to see real faces of people that the organization serves.)

voicEd Radio

My on demand page can be found here.  The latest edition features blog posts from:


Technology Trouble Shooting

Problems – I’m at the CSTA conference in Omaha this week.  Two great challenges come to mind.

  1.  Omaha is in the Central Time Zone.  I like to keep up appearances with posting regularly.  What do you need to do to make sure it still appears at the right time?  Or do I bother?  It’s interesting that my phone recognized the time zone change but not my laptop.  There’e got to be a setting somewhere.
  2. Lots of restaurants have worked out a deal.  Show your conference badge and get a 10% off meals but they will add a 20% tip.  I remember a couple of years ago when we had a showdown demoing how to create mobile apps.  It was to create a tip calculator.  Too bad that we don’t have a session this week.  The above would be a terrific challenge.  In lieu of that, why not assign it to your students?

 


Video of the Week

 


My Favourite Photo of the Week

It’s official.  We’re empty nesters.  We didn’t see the babies so we don’t know how many of the 9 made it.  Just one morning and mama duck was gone.

We’re hoping to see her next year.

Screenshot 2018-07-08 at 06.16.05

Thanks for reading.

dp

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Whatever happened to …


… Crimplene?

This suggestion from the Padlet.  With a little change in spelling at the beginning.

Screenshot 2018-07-07 at 06.48.00

The poster was anonymous although the reference to Walkerville pretty much gives it away!

You’re dating yourself if you remember this miracle material.  My mom was an excellent seamstress so I actually do remember her working with the material.  As I recall, it wasn’t the easiest and would often break needles in her sewing machine because it was a little stiffer than the standard cotton.  If you forgot to change the needle, it could cause the problem.

If I recall, the popularity of Crimplene was that is was fairly stiff in construction and didn’t crinkle with wear.  For the most part, it didn’t need to be ironed which is a big plus.  While I do remember the name and its reputation, I don’t recall ever wearing anything made from it myself.

To answer the other question in the suggestion, home sewn shirts are a remembrance for me.  For the most part, though, he had boxes and boxes of patterns that had been used to make dresses.

So, for a Sunday….

  • Do you remember the term Crimplene?
  • Can you remember any clothes that you had that might have been created with it?
  • When you buy clothes these days, do you look at the material it’s constructed from or do you just go with looks?
  • As I look around, the bulk of what I have is just plain ol’ cotton.  It fits my lifestyle but it does crinkle with wear.  How do you handle that?
  • Do you have any memories of home sewn clothing?
  • Does the name Butterick mean anything to you?
  • If you were to attempt to create and sew your own clothing, where would you go to buy the material?
  • Where would a student today go if they wished to learn how to sew?

I’d be interested in your memories of this “wonder material”.  Please share them in the comments below.

And, if you have any ideas for a future post, please include them in the Padlet.

Thanks.

OTR Links 07/08/2018


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.