Tell me a story

That was the name of one of the sessions that I attended at #ECOOcamp Owen Sound.  The descriptor was about using GIS to tell stories.

Regular readers of this blog will know that I’m a sucker for anything that deals with maps.  So, I decided to drop in and see what it was about.  I’ve been to many GIS sessions where the activities involves plopping spreadsheet data into a mapping program and then wow-ing over the results.  I had a second choice if this was the case.

It wasn’t the case and I was blown away.

The presenter, Patrick Hrycak gave us six minutes to explore some finished projects.  Click through to really get a sense as to what can be done.

Soldier Map Story

Mayors of Waterloo Map Story

and the third one was one that his French class had created

Owen Sound Bicycle Tour Story Map

biking.png

You’ll have to visit those links and scroll down through the timeline to see the complete story.  It’s a wonderful combination of mapping and other content melded to create that complete story.

So, me being me, I wondered what else was there and searched for “Amherstburg”.  I found some interesting maps.  Depending upon the topic, you might have to create a public account.

Amherstburg

I was taken by the diverse topics that people were turning maps into stories with.

Of course, the next step is to find ideas for the classroom.  Certainly, using others’ work is a starting point but thoughts immediately turned to …

  • resources to tell stories about reconciliation
  • the Underground Railway
  • Rum Runners
  • and, why not do a bicycle tour of your own community

All kinds of ideas come to mind.

Do you have any?

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One comment

  1. So cool, Doug! I’m amazed at the Owen Sound map – I’ve spent lots of time there over the years, and this was new learning for me (and in French, even, as a bonus). I really appreciated your possible topic suggestions . I’m thinking where I live that something about Rice Lake, and the way it changed over the years would be fascinating – or why the settlements along the lake and Trent-Severn waterway developed as they did. (Population patterns – Grade 7 and 8)

    Liked by 1 person

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