See you on the other side

Admit it.  You, like me, have heard and probably used the expression “Dig a hole to China”.  It’s based on the premise that if you started digging in your back yard, you’d come out somewhere on the other side of the globe in that country.

I remember it as a challenge in Geography.

But, when we took a look at the globe and spun it around, it turned out that we were a long way from China.  But it was kind of cool and an inspiration that the globe was attached at the top and on the bottom.  The next step was to create our own globes with styrofoam balls, sketch in the continents, estimate where we were in this globe and then, using a poker, go for a dig and see where we actually would come out.

These days, we can do it digitally.  This isn’t to demean creating your own manipulative globe and all the learning that goes along with the original activity, but there’s something cool about doing it on your computer.  I guess it’s the precision, but more interesting, repeated tries until you come up with a starting and ending point of interest.

It won’t happen though, if you start in Windsor, Ontario.

The other side of the globe to Windsor is somewhere in the South Indian Ocean.

2017-07-31_0633

If you look closely at the image above, (or open it in a new window), you’ll see that the co-ordinates that would normally be N and W to be in downtown Windsor, get changed to S and E and you’re now treading water.

The site is the Antipodes Map although you could do it manually yourself. Quickly, you dig that hole and see where you come out.  So, it begs the question, is there anywhere in Canada where you emerge on dry land?  Since both locations are plotted on a Google Map, zoom out a bit on each and do a little refined try to see if you can do it.

Don’t stop there though.  Scroll down the page and take a refresher course in Geography.  There’s lots of good stuff to read, including the paired cities.

And, depending upon your frame of mind, this might be a cheat or a real insight.

Antipodes: The Other Side of the World

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One Reply to “See you on the other side”

  1. It seems like there are some great math and geography connections here for the classroom. Now I’m starting to wonder if you could emerge on dry land, and if the same answer holds true for other countries. Which ones and why? Could we predict this based on closeness to water, and the size of the water as well? So much thinking involved here. Thanks Doug!

    Aviva

    Like

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