Whatever happened to …

… postcards?

I guess it’s sort of related to last week’s post but it is different.  Thanks to Sheila Stewart for the idea.  Coming from the land of the Sleeping Giant or fantastically coloured Persians, there are lots of opportunities for great looking postcards.

There was a time when it was a mainstay of every trip for us.  We would send home a postcard to the kids to prove that we were where we said we would be on vacation.  For a while, they collected them but stopped – either because they got bored or frustrated that they didn’t get to go.  

When I think of Niagara Falls and Clifton Hill, I can’t help but think of the postcard stands that are an integral part of every souvenir store.

But it’s been years (decades?) since I actually bought one there – or anywhere else that I’ve been for that matter.

It’s a shame though; usually they feature some absolutely terrific camera work from someone who really knows what they’re doing.  They typically have access to vantage points that the average photographer just doesn’t have.

Then, when I heard this song, I also figured that it would be bad luck to send one.

How about you?  Are you a postcard sender?

As always, on this Sunday, please check in with your thoughts.

  • When was the last time you sent a post card?
  • From where?
  • Have you instead moved to “Checking in” with the social media application of your choice to let people know that you went somewhere?
  • Do you create your own photo albums and then share them via social media or other forms to show what you saw?
  • Has your phone and its digital camera made it easier and more personal to share trip details with others?

Please share your thoughts via comment below.

Do you have an idea or thought that would be appropriate for my “Whatever happened to … ” series of blog posts.  They can all, by the way, be revisited here.

Please visit this Padlet and add your idea.  I’d love for it to be an inspiration for a post!

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4 thoughts on “Whatever happened to …

  1. Hi Doug!

    I am so happy you have written about this, as I am a huge postcard collector! I sometimes send them from where I am travelling, but I always make sure I buy some for me and I have stuck them all over my fridge and have a huge box under my desk for the rest : ) My students also know of my craze and mail me postcards from wherever they travel and I have two really beautiful ones from Mauritius – I have never been there or maybe never will be, but at least I have these beautiful images : )

    I don’t travel all that much now because of my workload and my Masters, but hope to start again. I used to share on Facebook, whole albums of photos, but now I don’t have an account there anymore. I also used to have an account on Foursquare to check in from places and share photos, but I also deleted that account way before Facebook, as it was too time-consuming and sometimes I got into that trip of “Oh no, I forgot to check in when I was at…” I must admit, it was good when I was travelling a lot for my family to see that I had arrived at my destination safely and I could see the same about them.

    Great post again, as always!

    Have a great Sunday,
    Vicky

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for taking up my suggestion, Doug. I didn’t know persians were on Wikipedia!

    I really can’t recall the last postcard that I sent. I do admire the whole idea of them though. I seem to recall they had a slow delivery compared to other mail (unless it was because the senders didn’t actually mail them until their trip was done 🙂 ). I still have a few that my Dad sent to me and brought back from a trip to Norway about 40 years ago. There was a time when I would check out the postcards for sale in antique shops and buy a few old gems of places that had meaning to me. Some had messages on them in that funny ink 🙂

    Did social media sharing/check in’s really kill the postcard?

    I enjoyed Vicky’s story and would love to see her collection!

    Like

  3. I send an average of 100 cards a month. I think of them as an analog tweets. But it’s personal and direct. I like making mail more fun. I get old stamp collections on Ebay as well as postcards (inexpensive). Once you start sending cards you realize there is a lot to communicate. Some of the family elders don’t have email. For others in my friends and family network, it’s a low effort and low commitment way to stay in touch. A few of us have ongoing postcard correspondence. I even send corporate postcards after meeting with a customer to thank them for their time. It’s fun. Just do it!

    Like

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