This Week in Ontario Edublogs

It’s been another wonderful week’s worth of reading from the blogs of Ontario Edubloggers.  Here’s a sampling of what I caught this past while.


Why We Should Care About Equity & Social Justice as Educators

Have you ever walked into a room full of people and you were the only one that looked visibly different? If you haven’t, chances are you’re lucky, maybe even privileged to not have ever been in this position, but I encourage you to read on and walk in my shoes for a bit. If you have, I know how you feel.

Rusul Alrubail paints an interesting scenario above.  My first reaction was no, I haven’t.  But, upon further reflection, I do remember that I did at university a number of times.  Studying Mathematics and Computer Science at a big university with smaller tutorial sessions does generate some interesting smaller work groups.  I think that the operative point was that we were there to work and social justice wasn’t the thread that brought us together so I can’t fully appreciate her point.

Her story should be a stop and ponder for educators.  I do find it interesting to people watch – at a shopping mall, on a city street, or a park.  It doesn’t seem to be an issue for today’s youth.  You’ll see an amalgam of faces and cultures as they walk about chatting and laughing.  Maybe there’s hope for humanity after all and we older people are just late to the party.

Regardless, it’s still no excuse and there are some excellent suggestions at the end of Rusul’s post for all to consider.


Stress Symptoms and Strategies

Unless you’ve lived the life of a teacher, you don’t really get it.  The critics point to the short at-work day and the holidays.  Of course, they’re not teachers so it’s easy to be on the outside looking in and judging.

Diana Maliszewski shares a post about a bit of her life outside of the classroom.

Since this is right smack in the middle of report card writing, I thought the topic of stress was rather relevant!

The stressors that she identifies are, admittedly self-inflicted, but reinforce that the educational world is so much better for the things that teachers do outside the classroom. 

Certainly, she didn’t have to do these things but Diana wouldn’t be the Diana that we all know and love if she didn’t.


Screen time guidelines and education

I love this graphic that Jennifer Casa-Todd included in her latest post.

So much discussion and criticism falls on technology being so evil for kids.  I recently had a discussion with a friend who complained that the kids in her neighbourhood all just stayed in doors and “played on their devices”.  Somehow that was all the fault of the kids.  Jennifer thinks that we could substitute parenting with teaching in the above. 

It’s a good reminder that we all make choices and we all have defaults.  If the default is not to be concerned and provide rich and engaging alternatives, is it fair to blame the kid who makes her/his own choices?


Battle Cry for Student Voice: Peer Assessment using @audioboom & QR Codes

If you know anyone who has difficulty seeing how technology can be used seamlessly and with great purpose, send them to read this post by Heather Durnin.

Peer and self-assessment helps develop a greater sense of responsibility, as students not only honestly reflect on their peers’ work, but also on their own. In terms of summative assessment, I found my students’ ratings of their peers to be honest and kind.

At the end of the exercise, one of the students asked if I was going to be marking the assignments as well. After confirming I would, he responded with, “I wish we could do this all the time.” The battle cry for “student voice”.

So often, technology is seen and used as a separate activity even though most schools have got beyond going to “the lab” to do things.  By itself, that’s not necessarily bad, but there can be so much more.  This post is a wonderful example of just what it might look like. 

What isn’t said here is that the students obviously have risen to a level of sophistication and responsibility to make it work. 

What a wonderful testament to a year’s worth of effort by Mrs. Durnin.


The #LearningLine Challenge

A number of people responded to Colleen Rose’s #LearningLine Challenge.

In the post, she shares the lines drawn by Lindy Amato, Rodd Lucier, Peter Cameron, and Joanne Borges.  They each provided a different picture of what learning meant to them and Colleen reflected on each.

Of course, everyone’s lines ended by going up.  How they got to “up” makes it worth the read.


How do you make it to the top of the slide?

Speaking of “up”, Aviva Dunsiger made it to the top and shared it in this post.

I can strike another off the ol’ bucket list.  Thanks to technology, I’ve now seen her go down a slide courtesy of Instagram.

Somehow, I think I’ve cheated my Computer Science students.  We never went on a field trip like that.


Getting social at #BIT16

One of the things that Cyndie Jacobs and I are proud of was bringing after-conference-hours social events to the Bring IT, Together conference.  We started with what we thought were neat things like the Niagara Falls after-dark PhotoWalk, the Mindcraft event, the BIT Jam session, and Run with Alana.  Sure, you always get a chance to meet up with old friends at conferences, but there are still those who don’t have the connections (yet) that are looking for something to do.

The tradition continues with some interesting twists this year – including an event that will be limited to 100 participants.  Leslie Boerkamp contributes a post to the BIT Blog outlining what she’s got planned this year for participants.

I won’t spoil her surprises – head over to see what she’s got planned for us.  Registration opens really soon so you’ll want to get in early.  You don’t want to be locked out of that group of 100, do you?


Yet again, it’s been another wonderful week of reading.  Thanks to everyone who takes the time to blog and share ideas.  Please click through and read their efforts and drop them a comment.  I’d appreciate it if you shared this post so that more people realize what amazing things are happening in Ontario.

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