This Week in Ontario Edublogs

As I type this, news has been announced of a tentative agreement between OSSTF and the province.  The trolls are already out commenting on news reports and I’m sure that there will be more as speculation grows on the contents.  Of course, details won’t be made public until the membership gets a chance to look at it.  Hopefully, this is a sign that movement is possible and that all of the professional organizations are able to reach an agreement.  We’ll see.

In the meantime, the professional learning and sharing continues throughout the province.  Here’s a bit of what I read this past week.


“Guide” Vs. “Sage”: Is It As Easy As That?

Aviva Dunsiger used this old horse as a starting point for her thoughts.  I remember grimacing the first time that I heard it.  I know that the intention was noble – stop standing and lecturing but it’s become the mantra of many who haven’t been in a classroom for years – like it’s an all or nothing concept.  It’s one of those cutesy sayings that you hear during presentations and, if you read Aviva’s post, you realize that it’s only surface deep.  Teaching is much more than nine words strung together.  She addresses it nicely and even includes a confession.


Guide on the Stage

Daniel La Gamba was motivated from this post to share his thoughts and create a Sketchnote on the topic.  I don’t know – will “Guide on the Stage” be the next “Sage on the Stage vs Guide on the Side”?  You can probably tell that I’m not a fan of short sound bites but I really think the wisdom comes from the last line in his post.

With September fast approaching, I encourage teachers to not be in the periphery. It is not the act of guiding that should change, just the proximity to the learning.

The key here, as I see it, is that teachers shouldn’t just “mail it in”.  Teaching is an incredibly active and personal activity.  One of the observations that I made as a DeLC was working with eLearning teachers who had their entire course and teaching online.  Their number one frustration – not having that face to face human contact.  I think that teaching in this mode made them better teachers in the long run.  It really reinforced the notion of what it means to be a teacher. 

Sadly, we were unable to comment on the blog post itself – the folks who were using Twitter as a forum could really have fleshed it out there.

There was considerable discussion about this online with Daniel taking a very active part.  Included in this discussion was George Couros who, while not an Ontario Edublogger will get special notice because he continued the discussion on his own blog “What about the title of “teacher?


What does it mean to be Reggio-inspired?

Not having been a kindergarten teacher, I always enjoy listening and reading early years’ professionals talk about their classrooms and their approaches.  I have two wonderful friends who take the time to explain things to me.  This post, by Joanne Babalis is a very nice summary of how she was inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach.

Loris Malaguzzi often spoke of learning as a tangle of spaghetti, rather than a linear path.  Well my mind certainly feels this way, especially when I am inquiring, reading/researching, thinking, interpreting, and reflecting.

This post isn’t a quick and easy read but definitely is worth the time to comprehend.

And, I really liked the Jerome Bruner quote.


Why We Need Intentional Innovation in Education

So, on to a discussion about “intentional innovation”.

It sure is.

After all, who doesn’t want to be “innovative” – whatever that means.

In this first of a series of posts, A.J. Juliani takes a look at what innovation means and then takes a spin when you put the word “intentional” in front of it.  There’s a challenge to the reader about being intentionally innovative this school year.  And why not?  The post is nicely summaried with the description “meaningful and relevant”.

This is a good place to start your creative thinking.


The Connected Student

You know, as I check the sundial, it says 2015.  It’s a crime that we still have to talk about the benefits of students/teachers being connected.  Yet, there remains a need.  I was watching HLN last night and both the Nancy Grace and Dr. Drew shows were encouraging the world to get involved with the conversation via a hashtag.  Are there really still people that see that on the screen and wonder what it is?  Hopefully, not teachers – I could guarantee any student with a computer, tablet, or smartphone knows absolutely knows what it’s about.  Nobody uses the term “pound” anymore, do they?

Now, I’m not suggesting that you flip your classroom with these two shows but spend a few minutes online and you’ll see awesome discussions and connections for educators, students, and classrooms.  If you’re not connected, you’re completely missing out.  Jennifer Casa-Todd shares a beautiful post outlining the possibilities that exist for the connected student.

Then, she follows up with a huge list of suggestions for how to get started, along with a couple of Sylvia Duckworth Sketchnotes.  What can you do?  Share this post with your administrator and colleagues.  It’s time to get with it if they aren’t.


Are Teachers Taught About Creative Commons?

This is not a new concept and yet something that a lot of people don’t really understand.  Donna Fry takes on the topic and uses the framework of the student remix as the rationale for why students and teachers need to understand the principle.

If you read the second sentence carefully, you’ll take your understanding to a new level.  Most people think that Creative Commons is just about finding free stuff that you can use without violating copyright.  Let’s up the ante.  Yes, there are times when someone has the perfect image to use in a project.  But, if you’ve been at this blog for a while, you know that I’m a big fan of students creating their own original works.  If they’re posting it online – any why not, read Jennifer’s post above – use this as an opportunity to discuss licensing in a very personal manner … their own.

It only takes a moment to look at the licensing options under Creative Commons and decide what’s appropriate for them.  Here’s what I’ve put on this blog.


Is it Initiative or Compliance?

The nice thing about scheduling blog posts is that you’re never really done until it goes out!  This morning was a perfect example.  I thought I was done and so Jaimie and I were off for our morning walk.  We had stopped at a bridge and were just staring in awe as the water from a tributary was flowing into a bigger part of the river when my birthday present from my wife on my wrist buzzed.  I looked and Brian Aspinall had just posted something to his blog and had tagged me with it.  Oh well, something to read when we got home.

I did read it and now was faced with a dilemma.  Do I save it for next week’s TWIOE or do I include it here.  After all, this post doesn’t go live until tomorrow morning.  I decided to do it now because I think it’s something that everyone should consider for their classroom and its management.  What do your students do when they’re done the current task?  Brian shares his list.

In the post, he asks that, if the students choose from this list, are they demonstrating initiative or compliance?  It’s pretty clear from the tone of the post that he’s thinking compliance.  I would agree in the way that he wrote it.  Given those options, I think if I was a student, I would just tend to work slower on the original project.  Those all look like extra work to me.

You do have to make the choices wisely.  If the list includes something that’s really cool or interesting, others will rush through the task in order to join in on the fun.

Why not read Brian’s post and add your ideas to the list?  The time is right with school starting in a couple of weeks to set classroom expectations and certainly managing time should be one of the issues.


Thanks to all of the above for contributing to share your expertise and pushing our thinking.  Please take a moment to click through to the original blog posts and share your thoughts.  Looking for more?  Check out the Ontario Edublogger collection.

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