2015 CSTA Annual Conference


 

Hilton DFW Lakes

Bigger and Better than Ever!

2015 CSTA Annual Conference
July 12-14, 2015, at the Hilton DFW Lakes, Grapevine, Texas

 

 

 

Registration is now open for the CSTA annual conference. CSTA 2015 is a professional development opportunity for computer science and information technology teachers who need practical, classroom-focused information to help them prepare their students for the future. Conference content is peer reviewed and peer or industry led, making it relevant to today’s classroom needs. This year we are staying true to being “bigger and better than ever” so we have expanded our conference to span three days, with two days worth of workshops, more exhibitors, along with multiple networking opportunities.

 

Highlights:

  • Explore issues and trends relating directly to your classroom
  • Learn, network and interact
  • Choose from various workshops and breakout sessions
  • Amazing value (complimentary conference Wi-Fi, breakfast, lunch and snacks – CHECK!) at approximately $100/day!

Some of this year’s session topics include:

  • Advanced Placement Computer Science
  • Computational Thinking
  • Increasing Enrollment in Computer Science
  • Programming
  • Robotics

Keynotes:

  • Megan Smith, Chief Technology Officer of the United States – Invited
  • Randy Pitchford, Aaron Thibault and Jimmy Sieben with Gearbox

Pre-registration is required and will be accepted for the first 500 teachers. The registration deadline is June 26, 2015. Also, please note that you must complete the payment portion of the online form in order to be fully registered for the conference!

As always, we thank our sponsors for their generous donations. Your registration fee will include networking opportunities, lunch and resource materials. The 2015 CSTA Annual Conference is made possible by the generous support of Google, Lockheed MartinOracle Academy and the University of Texas at Dallas.

Costs:

Conference registration (which includes a community session on Sunday (July 12) afternoon, Monday night’s event with the University of Texas at Dallas, and all general and plenary sessions on Tuesday (July 14) is $100 if you register by April 15. From April 16-June 26 the price is $150, and after that the price increases to $225.

 

Workshops are a separate price, and this year we have expanded our offerings to include options on Sunday, as well as Monday. The price for workshops is $100 for the first one, and $50 for each additional workshop (maximum number of three).

 

Please note that all workshops are “bring your own laptop” and that workshop registration is limited to 30-40 participants; so be sure to register early to get your workshop choice. As an additional reminder, we DO NOT accept workshop registrations onsite, and there is NO switching of options.

 

Register at: www.cstaconference.org

For more information contact Tiffany Nash, CSTA Events and Communications Manager at t.nash@csta-hq.org

 

P.S. A big thank you to the 2015 Conference Planning Committee:

 

Doug Peterson, Program Chair

J. Philip East, Workshop Chair

Duncan Buell, Review Chair

Mindy Hart, Volunteer Coordinator

Stephanie Hoeppner

Tammy Pirmann

Dave Reed, CSTA Professional Development Committee Chair

Hal Speed, Central Texas Chapter Conference Liaison

Sheena Vaidyanathan

Henry Vo, Dallas Fortworth Chapter Conference Liaison

Lizan Ward, Greater Houston Chapter Conference Liaison

Lissa Clayborn, Acting Executive Director, CSTA

 

We look forward to seeing you in Grapevine!

 

The CSTA 2015 Annual Conference is generously sponsored by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

CSTA is the voice for K-12 computer science and its educators.

 
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A Different Time


The story that malware was installed on hard drives was everywhere this morning.  Here’s an example.  “Russian researchers expose breakthrough U.S. spying program”.  There’s no doubt that this is scary stuff, although the article indicates who and what were the targets of this software.  It still is something to be wary of.  Presumably, it’s in the “right hands” now but what happens if this technology is reverse engineered (and it will be) and falls into the “wrong hands”?  It does serve as a reminder to make sure that you are installing updates as they come along and run security scans on your computer regularly.  At present, it appears as though current technology wouldn’t catch this vulnerability but you just might catch something else hiding on your system.

This, and my masterpiece creation for calculating wind chill earlier this week reminds me that it wasn’t always this difficult.  Now that we’re connected so often and installing, sharing, and just visiting web resources, it’s easier to catch malware than it is to catch a cold, it seems.  As I was plunking around looking for the state of the BASIC programming language, I stumbled into this website, Vintage BASIC.  It is a reminder of the old days.

In the old days, one of the things that we were all so fascinated with was the ability to take this inanimate object and make it act like it was human.  The best way to do this was to have it play games.  If you long for those days, you’ll love the collection you’ll find here.

Now this is quality and classic.  None of this 3-D realism and surround sound that makes you feel like you’re right in the middle of the battlefield.  The program and your mind did the thinking and virtualizing!

image

And, you were safe doing it.

The programs were written in BASIC and you typed it into an editor and then ran it on your system.

In addition to developing keyboarding skills, you were learning a second language.

10 PRINT TAB(26);"ACEY DUCEY CARD GAME"
20 PRINT TAB(15);"CREATIVE COMPUTING  MORRISTOWN, NEW JERSEY"
21 PRINT
22 PRINT
30 PRINT"ACEY-DUCEY IS PLAYED IN THE FOLLOWING MANNER "
40 PRINT"THE DEALER (COMPUTER) DEALS TWO CARDS FACE UP"
50 PRINT"YOU HAVE AN OPTION TO BET OR NOT BET DEPENDING"
60 PRINT"ON WHETHER OR NOT YOU FEEL THE CARD WILL HAVE"
70 PRINT"A VALUE BETWEEN THE FIRST TWO."
80 PRINT"IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BET, INPUT A 0"
100 N=100
110 Q=100
120 PRINT "YOU NOW HAVE";Q;"DOLLARS."

If there was a statement that made your computer reformat your hard drive, you knew it immediately and just didn’t key it!  How’s that for the original malware checker?

Things were so much safer and black/white.

We didn’t have to be so paranoid but it wouldn’t enable things like Graham Culey’s “Targeted Attacks for Dummies”.

But we live in a completely different place and time.

When was the last time you scanned your computer for malware?

OTR Links 02/19/2015


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.