Highlight Your Reading

Recently, I read an article that listed 4 Tools to Simplify the Blogging Process.  Yeah, I know, they don’t come much simpler than me.

As I read the article, I thought – OK, I’m doing this. Feedly, One Tab, Evernote and then a new one – CruxLight.  Never heard of it.  I took a quick read of the descriptor.  I’m very interested.  It reads the webpage on your screen and summarizes the main points.

I’m really interested.  This was a skill that was taught throughout school in English and French classes.  Of course, on paper, you would use a highlighter.  That made reviewing for tests and examinations possible.

I’ve got to check out this Chrome Extension.  Off to the Google Chrome store I go.

A quick download later and I’m ready to go.

I decide that the first thing I’ll do is check my instance of Hootsuite.  I’m not sure that I was expecting but I wasn’t expecting this!

The page you are trying to view is loosely connected. Try summarizing wikipedia articles, news articles, etc.

Although, when you think about it, it makes sense.  A typical Hootsuite screen is really a collection of usually non-related topics.  I figured that I’d try a different page – I tried one of my blog post pages and was immediately impressed.  It seemed to be able to instantly understand when I was making a point and when I was providing background information.  The points were highlighted so that I could focus just on them.

Here is my post about Symbaloo after the CruxLight treatment.

Symbalo

A click again and I’m into a layout with only the most important parts visible from the post and on the right side, CruxLight pulls out what it was determined to be the Focus of the page.

And, the second layout.

Symbaloo2

It’s an interesting extension.  Over the time that I’ve had it, I just leave it running and let it highlight what it thinks is important.  I’ll be honest; I don’t trust it 100% yet and I do skim through the non-highlighted material just to see what I’m missing.  To date, it really does seem to do a good job.  I wonder if I’ll ever fully trust it.

In an English class, I could see this being a very interesting tool to be use when you’re teaching how to read articles online.  It does ignore advertising and seems to do a pretty nice job of pulling the important points from an article.  I’d be very interested in any language teachers’ thoughts on its use.  For me, I’ve added it to my version of Chrome and am enjoying it.

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