Customize your own Google Chrome


 

Warning – slightly geeky post this morning.

But, if you’re a Google Chrome user, I’ll bet you try it at least once!

How many times have you looked for a Google Chrome theme that says “Hey, this is me…” and failed?  You’ll end up going back to the defaults or compromising on something close.

Well, no longer!  Head over to the Google Chrome Store and download “My Chrome Theme“.

It only takes a few seconds … once installed, go ahead and launch the application.

You’re there!

Follow the three steps and you’ve created your own theme.

Step 1 – If you’d like an image on the opening background, upload it from your computer or use your Webcam to take your perfect image.  Read the fine print at the bottom before doing so…your content will be uploaded.  The first time I ran this, I used an image that had already been posted on this blog – the image with Kerry, myself, and David Pogue digging my car out after the big snow storm at the RCAC Symposium a few years ago.  It’s one of my favourites but, for me, a background image really isn’t usable since I use the Incredible StartPage anyway which overwrites the image.

Step 2 – Choose some colours!  Active tab, background tab, background tab bar, background area.  Or, the infamous Google “I’m Feeling Lucky”.

If you know me, you’ll know that there aren’t enough shades of green to keep me happy.  I thought that pinky/orange was a nice contrast.

Step 3 – Install your theme.

If you’re so inclined, share the themes with others.  Just keep in mind the caveat about the images.

Wasn’t that easy?

You now have that perfect theme for yourself.  Or, if you’re using Google Chrome with your class, you could pop an image of the school and populate Chrome with your school colours. Or….

 

OTR Links 09/25/2012


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Who do you follow – Apple or Google?


There has been much written about the new Apple Maps that comes with iOS6.  While there have been a few that are fans of it, the majority of the press has been negative.  I decided to take a look myself and see how it might impact my little world.  Mapping for the consumer is a fairly mature process.  It’s on your smart phone, the web, your portable GPS and an option in new vehicles.  Not only do I use it personally when going on trips to new places, it’s helped me find quicker ways to get around places that I already know about.

My first steps weren’t off to a great start.  I asked it to plot where I was – and it turned out to be half a concession away.  That’s not a great start but at least the concession road was right.  But, I know where I live so I guess that’s pretty much irrelevant.  Let’s try something more serious.

Like dog walking.  One of our favourite places to go for a walk is in the heart of town and we’ll often stroll down Fort Malden Drive to see the sights.  Uh oh.

Don’t you hate it when OCR goes wrong?  That would probably explain Collison Sideroad too…

Cute little finds and I didn’t have to look too hard.  Maybe not deal breakers but when you can’t find an entire town?  I decided to take a look around Huron County.  There are five major towns there – Goderich, Clinton, Wingham, Seaforth, and Exeter.  Sadly, only Goderich was found in the right place.

This was an attempt to find Exeter, ON.

When I did zoom out, I discovered I80 and further zooming out reveals this to be in Pennsylvania in a place that appears to be called West Pittston.

Not even close.  I can’t even comment on whether that’s up to date or recent.

So, while it may find Goderich, ON, it struck out with Exeter, ON.  Let’s spell it out… Exeter, Ontario.  This search does drop a pin in the right spot.  However, I’m not so sure about their phone number or website.

But, I can tell you this.  The town of Harrow, ON’s main intersection is County Road 11 and County Road 20.  This map has it labelled King’s Highway 18.  This was true – years ago until the province of Ontario gave up maintenance of highways!  The article dates it as 1997.  To the map’s defense, if you zoom in far enough, the road carries a double label of Highway 18 and County Road 20.  That’s not too confusing.

Sadly, all of this refers to places that I actually know about and wouldn’t be using a map application for anyway.  The same tests using Google or Bing Maps provide the right content.

Mapping problems have spawned all kinds of news stories of problems.  There is even a Tumblr page devoted to people identifying problems.  And, there are all kinds of alternatives.  Fortunately, I had already bookmarked the Google Maps Web Application and it was maps as usual for me.  If you are concerned, there are some good suggestions.

The unfortunate part of all this is that the implementation may also reflect badly on the partners that provide the content.  If you turn the leaf at the bottom right corner of the screen, you can see them.

It’s too bad that the original Google Maps application was removed.  It had been a good actor.  iOS6 could even have left it alone, installed the Apple Maps application and let the end user decide which one they would ultimately use.

For me, though, if I can’t trust the reliability of maps for places that I know, how can I rely on it to take me to new places?  The programmer in me really does hope that there’s a fix on the way.

But, for now, I’m going to stick to my Google Maps Web Application.

OTR Links 09/24/2012


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

From Where Does Your Learning Come?


 

I read a great post yesterday from Dangerously Irrelevant from “way back” in June of 2011.  It was entitled “If you were on Twitter yesterday…” and it brought back a nice memory.  I recall reading it when it was originally posted and so it was a nice déjà vu.  Other than nostalgia, it’s a good message anytime.

From where does your learning come?

In the good old days, it might be from a district PD Day a couple of times a year and perhaps some ongoing magazine reading and talking with colleagues.  Certainly that doesn’t happen today – does it?

It you were on Twitter yesterday, your links to learning could come from anywhere on the planet.

Want to see where?  Then head over to Tweeting Earth.

Here’s a search with a twist.  Like most search engines, you enter a search key to get things started.  The results are displayed based upon that key but here’s the deal.  They’re plotted by timezone!  And, plotted around the globe.

So, ever the humble Twitter user, I decided to see where anything dealing with “dougpete” came from.  Here are the results…

Click for the full image

It appears that there’s a big gap before London – wait, that’s the Atlantic Ocean.  Guess I need to work on my reach on airplanes and ships!  Click on any of the slices to pop up a screen to see the actual Twitter messages.  It offers and reinforces the important view that we’re not in a staffroom talking to one other person.  Such is the reach of global connections – it’s up to you to make these connections meaningful and relevant.

How about references to the blog?

Interesting as well.

If you’re looking for a visual way to see what the world is tweeting, you’ll really enjoy playing around with this.  From the bottom left, you can also choose the global trends online and see where they’re coming from.

Warning – this is really addictive!

Search for yourself – you know you want to!  Search for your passion.  Other than a way to show comments globally, you might just make some new friends to continue your discussions!