When Crowd Sourcing Fails

@missnoor shared a really interesting link yesterday.  It was about "The Stupid Things You Do on Facebook (and How to Fix Them)" and was posted to the Lifehacker website.  I read the article and really liked the content.  In the article, there are a number of common things that people do or neglect to do with respect to their Facebook accounts.

It’s the sort of content that I would share with my kids and might also make reference to in a presentation on digital citizenship or digital footprint or using Facebook or whatever….

So, I do what I normally do.  I save it to my Diigo account.  That’s where I keep resources like this for safe keeping and later retrieval.  (I’ve blogged about this before – it will be backed up to my Delicious account, and to my blog tonight.  Lately, as part of a communications experiment, I also post it to my Pinterest account.  It’s funny how, when you have this sort of routine, that the mouse clicks become second nature.

So, I’m doing the routine and watching television.  I look down at the computer just to do something before moving on and get a whoa! moment.

Oh oh.  I must have done something wrong.  I pay closer attention and repeat the process and get the same message.  Huh?

What’s wrong with the link?  I look through and the story is from Lifehacker.  In my opinion, it’s a pretty credible site and I use it all the time. 

So, I do what any rational person would do.  I repeat the process and click harder.  Still a problem.

OK, maybe I can get around this.  I try Pinstamatic to do the whole page trick.  Same results.

I’m not destined to post this to Pinterest, it appears.  So, what does Pinterest have against this site?  Upon further inspection, it’s not Pinterest, it’s "users".  Oh yeah?  Who?  Name them?  I have no idea but according to the message, there are enough of them to force this message.  Or, perhaps there’s a bug in Pinterest.

But, the bottom line still bothers me.  Why do these "Users" or Pinterest itself get to make the decision about what I get to pin or not to pin.  Even if I give the "Users" or Pinterest the benefit of the doubt that there might be something wrong with the link, should they have the power to deny me the ability to pin something? 

I would think that a sensible saw-off would be to present the message and then give me one of those "Are you sure you really want to do this?" message.  That would give them the satisfaction of making the online world a safer place and still let me tuck this away for later use.

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One Reply to “When Crowd Sourcing Fails”

  1. It sounds like the censorship that was happening at Apple last week, where song and app titles that had the word “jailbreak” were automatically asterisked. Silly!

    Like

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