Whatever happened

to Google Wave?

It hit with a big splash and a number of us jumped in to experiment.  It was neat; it was funky; it was different.  But, after the initial buzz, I’ve been just waving to myself at times to stay on top of the new enhancements.

In the beginning, I got my invite from a Twitter user who I’ve never met in person but was following me.  From there, I got my invites to send out and quickly ran out but Google was good enough to give me more and more.  I’ve got one left but now that you no longer need an invitation to join, I may just hang on to it as a keepsake.

Yesterday, I read this article that has given raise to some curiosity on my part.  It’s from the folks at ReadWrite Web and talks about how to use Google Wave for Live Blogging.  It’s an interesting concept and I may give it a shot the next time to try to do some live blogging.

I’m still puzzled with the lack of uptake in my own realm.  It may well be that it’s one of the most powerful applications in the entire Google suite but my little world tends to gravitate to other applications to do those tasks.  For example, I think of Coveritlive rather than Wave when I’m thinking of live blogging.  Collaborating on a concept?  I’ll move to a shared Google Doc or any of the great applications of Etherpad that are available.

So, I struggle with this.  Where does it or should it fit into the big scheme of things?

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4 Replies to “Whatever happened”

  1. I was going to use Google Wave with my students. This message popped up:

    “To use Google Wave in Internet Explorer you need to install the Google Chrome Frame browser plugin”

    I can’t have the kids install something that will get their accounts banned.

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  2. I’m planning on using Wave with my Web2.0 class next school year. How will we use it? I don’t know, yet.

    I’m going to have Chrome installed as part of the image for the computers at DCVI next year so I hope the problem from the comment above will be averted.

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  3. Google wave is the Frankenstein’s monster of the google app world. In trying to combine too many acquired tools (etherpad being the most recognized) into one platform, google created a tool that required an hour long video to attempt to explain how to use it. 

    Collaborating with others is difficult. You sign up for wave using your google accounts email (not necessarily gmail) and then you have to create an @googlewave.com email address that others need to utilize in order to find you. This can be a difficult transition, especially for students who are accustomed to the ease of sharing a google doc. 

    Think of it like 7.1 surround sound: in theory it’s a better experience, but try to explain that to someone who uses the speakers on the side of their tv that you really need seven speakers and a sub, when in reality they will be blown away by two good speakers. Wave looks neat. It looks powerful. It looks like it could be a wonderful tool for collaborating with others. But in a world of MS WORD users (or worse yet Publisher), I’ll continue to be content to attempt to change the world view of text collaboration with docs, rather than try to explain something it takes google an hour to describe. We are the audiophiles of the teaching world (we know tech enhances learning in the same way a stereo trumps earbuds; but the world wears earbuds), and google wave is the bluray player in a world where a large group of users are still content with the quality of VHS. 

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  4. I have used it pretty effectively as a way to brainstorm and plan a project. One of the things I was finding with Google Docs was that users kept adding their opinion or asking questions in parentheses or in a different color. We ended up having an embedded conversation in the document. The conversation was important, but it didn’t flow right. Google Wave allowed us to keep a flowing document up top, while we could have a conversation under it.

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