Perfect


Amidst all of the negative and threatening things in the news, it’s so refreshing to hear good news.

And, not just good news – great news.  How great?  So great that only 18 people have ever done it in the history of Major League Baseball.  From the Baseball Almanac comes this list identifying 11 American League and 7 National League perfect games including the name, time of the game, and the attendance.

Looking up and down the list reveals some incredibly historical names in baseball – Martinez, Johnson, Koufax, Bunning, Wells, Rogers, Larsen, Young, Hunter.  To this list, we can now add the name of Mark Buehrle of the Chicago White Sox.  Yesterday, he threw a Perfect Game against the Tampa Bay Rays.


Thanks Multisanti – CC

In this day of baseball specialists, winning a baseball game remains a feat.  Usually, it involves relief pitchers to close out the game.  Something incredibly special is a no-hitter where the pitcher silences the bats.  However, the ultimate is the Perfect Game.  Quite simply, it means pitching and getting every player from the opposing team out in order.  27 straight outs.  All the time against millionaires who live, breathe, train, practice and perfect the art of hitting.

While a Perfect Game is noted for the pitcher, don’t lost sight of the fact that baseball is a team game.  In this case, a spectacular catch by Dwayne Wise sealed the deal.

It is absolute and unadulterated perfection in baseball.  In all of the history of baseball, where every modern team plays 162 regular season games plus tie-breakers, plus playoff games, plus World Series, it has only been done 18 times.  Words, images, video do their best to capture the moment but I can’t even begin to imagine the sense of history and euphoria that played out on the field yesterday.  The White Sox who enjoyed the moment, hoping it would last forever and at the same time wishing the event was complete; the Rays trying their best to just get to base and yet secretly hoping to witness such an event; the fans who were bathing in the moment realizing they were witnessing something incredibly unique; and the umpires who want to maintain the impartiality of their position and just hoping not to make an error to change the course of the game.  Television is alive with the story and replays and we’ll continue to see this over and over.

Remember the date – July 23, 2009.

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