Blogging Types


I haven’t read a better article about the blogging experience than the one that I read yesterday here.  The entry tries provide insights on the different ways that people blog.  It’s a good read and makes you think about what makes one blog stand out over another.

Now, these are considerably different from those tests that you’ll find on Facebook.  “What kind of shoe are you?” or “What decade are you?” are in my Facebook news feed right now.  Geesh.

In this entry, Skellie identifies five different blogging types.  I think that the descriptions are pretty apt and, while I didn’t identify with the blogs cited as examples, I was able to classify my personal regular reading habits immediately.  It also confirmed exactly why I’ve stopped following some blogs, even those of people I work with.

Each of the five blogging types have identified pros and cons and I can fully understand each in the context of the blogger behind the keyboard.

For me, I would like to think that I’m a type 2.

2. Every Day, Without Fail

Practitioners: J. D. Roth, Darren Rowse (et al.)

Description: These bloggers have to be admired for their tenacity. They will not accept anything less than a new post every day. You’ll often find that bloggers who can master this habit are destined for big things.

I do my best to ramble on about something every day.  It results in two entries virtually every day.  First, I have my latest findings from my delicious account scraped over.  That’s easy.  As I find web resources of interest, I bookmark them and they’re automatically posted as a new entry using the blog tool from delicious themselves.

The second entry is usually an opportunity for me to flesh out something that I’m thinking about.  I do have a regular routine of reading news feeds first thing in the morning and either comment immediately or think about it on the drive into work where the blog entry is already formed in my mind.  It’s just a matter of converting it to words.  That way, I keep (and share), some topics that I’ve thought about or have worked on.  It really formalizes the process for me.

The shortcoming of this type of entry is that they tend to indeed be short.  Unlike the great Canadian novel entries that some write, I hope that they’re meaningful and directly to the point.  My philosophy is that blogging shouldn’t be a novel with all of the facts fleshed out.  I think that the best part of blogging encourages the reader to engage and think about the topic de jour.  It’s even more powerful when it motivates the reader to share a comment or two.

If you’re looking for a research source, there are better avenues.

I really liked this entry.  The five types of blogger are nicely fleshed out and it gave me some things to mull over – and the inspiration to create this entry!

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