Make Sure To Book A Nap


Last year, when Cyndie Jacobs and I agree to co-chair the Bring IT, Together Conference in Niagara Falls, we wanted to take advantage of everything that we could.  The Scotiabank Convention Centre is a beautiful facility and was very conducive for the type of learning that technology-using educators need.  In no small part, a large, formal exhibit hall let participants experience the latest in technologies that you were either currently using or could reasonably expect to use in the near future.

 

But we wanted more!

Niagara Falls is such an incredible place to visit and could there be a more social place in Canada?  To that end, we built in all kinds of social activities to the event.

It’s so good to know that this year’s committee is committed to bringing back the wonderful events that happen outside the traditional conference hours.  Look for:

  • Tuesday Welcome Reception at the Convention Centre;
  • Wednesday Welcome dance with the Kung Fu Lawyers;
  • Thursday Bring IT, Together Reception & Network @ 4:45 – 6 p.m. in the Exhibit Hall;
  • Thursday Photo Walk @ 8:30 p.m. leaving from SCCN and heading to the Horseshoe Falls;
  • Thursday BIT Jam Session from 8:30 p.m. – 12:30 am @ SCCN, Ballroom C;
  • Thursday BIT Minecraft LAN Party from 8:30 p.m. – 12:30 am @ SCCN;
  • Friday Run/Walk/Be Active with Alana! @ 7:00 a.m.

Photo Credit – thanks, Heather Durnin (not photoshopped!)

And, a new event this year -  #BIT14 #SelfieScavenger Selfie Scavenger Hunt

The selfie is all the rage these days with young and old alike!  Join in the fun at the Bring It Together conference by getting to know our conference venue and each other with our selfie scavenger.  Capture yourself with a conference committee member, an exhibitor from the exhibit hall, of yourself learning something new in the Learning Space, a staff member from the Scotiabank Convention Centre and at least three of our six fantastic keynotes.  All you need is your best smile, your smartphone, and a Twitter/Instagram account to play.

To enter:
1.  Take a photo or video of one of the #SelfieScavenger suggested capture ideas.
2.  Tag it with both #SelfieScavenger #bit14 starting on Wednesday, November 5th, 2014.
3.  Share it on Twitter/Instagram.  Last entry by noon on Friday, November 7th, 2014.
4.  Follow the hashtag, like your favourites and encourage people to like yours.
5.  Win some really COOL prizes for participation, popularity, and originality!

#SelfieScavenger prizes?  Thursday and Friday … in the theatre and exhibit hall.

Complete details are available on the Social Events page on the website.  Look for restaurants offering meal discounts for #BIT14 conference attendees.

Oh, and don’t forget the learning.

And … make sure that you schedule a nap somewhere in there.

How We’re Connected


It’s no secret that I love exploring with maps.  I think it can be the ultimate infographic! 

If you spend a lot of time exploring a map, there are so many great stories behind it.

This resource is just plain fascinating.  It’s called “Greg’s Cable Map“.

The map, created in Google Maps, shows under water cable connections, current and future. 

Navigate the map by mousing over a cable and the name and details of the cable appear at the bottom of your display.  On the right, click on the name of the specific connection for details and further links.  There is a caution that the details may not be completely accurate in location.  That’s completely understandable.

If you want to take the politics out of things, switch from the basic map to a satellite representation.

I’ll bet that you’ll find yourself being a connected global navigator in no time at all.  Of course, it makes for wonderful classroom discussion!

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


It’s Friday and time to reflect on some of reading I did from around the province this past week.  There are some new (to me) blogs featured this week and an old friend.  When you’re done scouting these, make sure that you read the complete collection of Ontario Edublogs.


It’s a Slow Process

Thanks, Brian Aspinall, for giving me the heads up on Nicole Beuckelare’s blog.  It was nice to find something new and to add it to the Livebinder and the Scoopit! page

Her latest post reflects on the length of time that it takes for change to happen.

I had to smile – anyone who works anywhere in education is quite aware of this phenomenon.  It’s amazing to think that computers and related technologies have been around in the classroom for over 30 years.  Yet, there are some people that are just finding this out!  Ditto for the concept of making to learn.  It’s not a new concept; teachers of technologies have known that creation is the best possible way to learn for years.

In her post, Nicole mentions that she had taken part in the PLP Group five years ago.  That brought back memories for me.  I submitted two cohorts years ago.  Both of the cohorts grew incredibly from the experience.  It really helped the eLearning teachers incorporate more web technologies in their online courses.  The elementary school teachers developed a culture of sharing and celebrating everything among themselves.  It didn’t happen over night but it did happen with the intense supports put in place.

But, how about the hundreds of others that didn’t have the experience?  They work hard every day with the tools, knowledge, and understanding that they have.  Change is a longer process here.

The whole concept, again, reinforces the notion that ongoing professional learning is required for all if we want significant change.  Just how many opportunities does your district give you this year?  If there are few to none, are they really serious about making change happen?


My Promise to You

This post flows nicely from Nicole’s.

Aviva Dunsiger is extremely visible about the change that she wants to make.  There’s always a new post of interest about something on her blog.

Her recent post shares some of the techniques that she uses to try to ensure success for all of her students.

It’s important to note the totality of her efforts.  It’s not just technology that’s the answer.  I think that’s an important message for all to hear.  It’s a great tool but isn’t necessarily the only one.

Aviva reflects on the complete package.


The New Wave of Vocab Games

Communication is what it’s all about in the language classroom, whether first or second language.  Interestingly, oral communications, which is so important may well be the less precise of all the communications.  When the recipient of the communication can interpret not only the actual communication but also the intent, you can be “close” and still be understood.

If you want to see this in action, watch me butcher the French language and yet still get the message across.

To be really precise, use a computer!  Ironically, this precision can be very motivating for students.

In this post, Myra Mallette shares two applications that she’s using this year – Quizlet and Kahoot.

If you know of a French teacher looking for a way to further engage students, send them this link.  Well crafted gaming can do so much in the classroom.


New Book ~ Reflecting in Communities of Practice: A Workbook for Early Childhood Educators

When I finished my time at the Faculty of Education, there really wasn’t any way to continue the learning through them.  I guess that the logic was that once you’ve jumped the fence and got your BEd, it’s time to move on and grab the next class.

I’m not sure that the intent of the Faculty of Education, UWO’s blog is to reach out to the entire teaching profession but why not?  Check out this blog to find the latest and greatest resources that have been added to their library.  If it looks good and you have access to that library, great.  If not, forward the title to those who look after the professional collection wherever you work and ask that they purchase the materials and make them available to your organization.

After all, we all know that learning shouldn’t stop just because you graduated!


Thanks to all of the bloggers who continue to share their thinking and push us all to new and exciting things.  There’s always some great learning shared by Ontario Edubloggers.

 

Better Searching


This story “10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Do With #Twitter Search” crossed my reading yesterday morning.  It’s a story about using advanced commands and modifiers to refine your Twitter Search.

I used to call this button the most useless link on the internet.

I wonder if anyone has ever seriously found anything that way.  Certainly, it is a curiosity and an amusement, but serious searching?

In fact, any search engine worth its salt has advanced commands and modifiers.  All that you have to do is learn and then commit them to memory or….

Use the advanced searching features!

So, while a Twitter search begins with this page….

….there is an advanced search page where you can use the sophisticated search features mentioned in the article.  Just click here instead.

 

Rather that memorizing the modifiers, just fill in the form and search.

No need to committing things to memory.

What a great way to zero in on the type of discussions happening on Twitter.

While at it, consider your other search engines.

For example, Google Basic looks like this..

But, there is an advanced search page here…..

Ditto for Yahoo!….

and the advanced search

 

As you can imagine, just with these few examples, there is no actual standard for advanced searching.  But, by using the Advanced Search features, you don’t need to know the syntax of a particular site.  Just fill in the form and start reeling in the results.

For the serious searcher, it makes more sense to me that you head directly to the advanced searching page to get to the precise results 

A Great RPN Calculator


We were having company for supper last night. 

To make it special for the little ones, we decided to serve Kentucky Friend Chicken.  Now, there hasn’t been a store in Amherstburg in years so guess who got to drive into Windsor to get it?

As I stared at the menus, I remembered the good old days when they served chicken and cole slaw.  Things really have changed.  The menus are huge.  So, I’m standing there doing a little, actually a lot, of mental math to try to determine what the best value would be.  I selected and ordered.  There would be a fifteen minute wait while they cooked the chicken!  I looked at the clock – it wasn’t anywhere near one o’clock, the traditional end of the lunch hour!  How could they be out?  <grin>

Well, we wanted to do it so I decided to order and wait.  To kill some time, I pulled out my phone and started doing some math with the pricing on the menus.  It wasn’t a horrific task; there were math questions all over the place.  What’s the best value?  Is the price of a bowl of cole slaw the same with every order?  What’s the best value for pop that’s available in three sizes? As my kids would point out, these are the reasons I sit alone in public places.

There were so many things to calculate, I soon find that I’m doing the math on the standard calculator that comes on my Android and realize that it wasn’t efficient use of my time.  Then, I clued in.  I was using an algebraic calculator.  I could be much more efficient with an RPN Calculator.  You may recall that I’ve blogged about this before and before.  I thank my university statistics professor for recommending my original HP21 calculator. 

Chicken isn’t cooked so I’m off to the Google Play store to look for an RPN Calculator to download.

It turns out there were a LOT of them.  One in particular caught my eye because it was the spitting image of the HP products that I was so fond of.

 

 

I became really engrossed with this program.  It’s such a nice and faithful copy of the original – even to the LED display that couldn’t be read in bright sunlight!

Other than just using the calculator, the whole experience brought back a few problems from my computer science classroom.  First, you have to teach students just what RPN is and then have them write the code.  The HP 21 had a nice rolling stack of 4 which led right into another sort of topic that you’ll only find in a computer science classroom.  And, the nice thing about writing your own calculator program is that you can add feature after feature, including printing graphs.  Function keys extend the function of any of the buttons.  It’s just a shame that we had to use a mouse to press the buttons at the time.

Sir, your chicken is ready.

Well, the moment has passed but I’ve been inspired to get the application and play with it.  Who says mathematics can’t be fun?

This Week in Ontario Edublogs


I’ve got to start this post with a big round of appreciation to Aviva Dunsiger.  Even though she lives 4 hours from me, she knows my blogging habits.  When a post didn’t go through yesterday, she knew it immediately and let me know.  I had to do some work – for some reason WordPress always goes to April in the Chrome browser.  I still don’t know why.  I’m back home to Firefox to write this post so I’m hoping that there are no glitches.  In the meantime, check out Aviva’s blog – she’s always good for an interesting post and you’ve probably seen many references to her blog from mine.

On to some of the good stuff this week from Ontario Edubloggers.


Life in Uganda

There’s a lot being said about Visible Thinking these days.  In this post, Jaclyn shares some of the questions that her class are asking about Uganda to phrase their thinking and research.

Often, we see this sort of thing at the end of the activity.  By placing it up front, students have them at home and at school for reference, parents see what’s happening and it’s bound to make the thinking deeper.


Singing the Homework Blues

Could there be anything that says “back to school” more than worrying about homework – whether as a teacher or a parent?

It’s a tough topic.  If you’re doing any reading about homework, you’ve probably noticed the discussion around the value of it.  In fact, there are some districts that are banning it altogether.

I remember, as a student, having to spend an hour after school in my room “doing homework”.  I recall a variety of activities like writing, colouring, drawing, or my favourite – doing mathematics.  Now that I’m blogging, I wish that I’d paid more attention to writing – I keep getting nailed as a passive writer.  Grrr.

After supper, I had to go back to my room for another hour.  This time, it was to practice playing the guitar.  We were paying for the lessons and I guess my parents were determined to get their money worth.  It probably worked – playing the steel guitar, I’ve known more Hawaiian or Country & Western songs than any student should have to.

As I think about it, the guitar and most of the homework was painstaking practice and repetition.  You’ve got to love the drill and kill – not!  But the fun was in finding a new way to solve a problem or to create a new song on the guitar.  That stuck with me.  As a new teacher, I thought that I had to assign homework.  I can’t remember what was the most useless activity; taking it up or going around checking to see who had done it and who hadn’t.  Later, I ditched the drill homework.  I had subscribed to “Games” magazine and used it as inspiration to give puzzles for homework instead.  Immediately, there was an uptake in doing these puzzles and coming to class on time was a priority since that’s when we solved the puzzle as a class.  And, when you peel back the onion, what’s computer science if not solving puzzles?


Making My Thinking Visible…the MMM Goes Public!

Donna Fry gave me a heads-up on this new blog.  I’ll be honest; I don’t even know who the author is but the first post is interesting.

At first blush, I think it goes beyond just making the thinking visible.

It’s about making the leadership visible.

It definitely goes out on a limb.  Everyone gets a chance to see the message and respond to it.

I wonder why more leaders don’t do this.  (Actually, I know the answer to that and I’m sure that you do too.)


GBL beyond Minecraft

When I read the title to Diana Maliszewski’s post, I thought that maybe she was going to talk about the recent Microsoft acquisition but, in fact, it turned out to be about Bop It!

I’d never heard of this before but really enjoyed Diana’s description about how she’s been using it.

If you’re teaching Drama and Dance, you might just want to check this out.

It sounds like fun.  I wish I was in this class.  I wonder if Diana will bring it to the BIT Conference for a little more social fun.


What a great collection of shared learnings from Ontario Educators this week. Please check out the original posts and all of the work from the Ontario group. There’s always something exciting happening.

Bringing it Together


Last week, information about the Bring IT, Together conference was sent to all those who are members of the Educational Computing Organization of Ontario.  It highlighted much of what will happen in Niagara Falls on November 5-7.  But, I know that not everyone is an ECOO member so I’m reposting the message here for the rest of you.  It would be wonderful for you to join Ontario educators for three days of learning, sharing, and making new contacts from outside your board.

 


 

In two short months, Bring IT, Together 2014 will be here.  After a year in planning, it will be exciting to see great Ontario Educators come together for three days of learning and sharing in Niagara Falls.  You’ll want to be one of them.

 

La conférence Bring IT, Together 2014 sera ici dans seulement deux mois! Après un an de planification, il sera intéressant de réunir les éducateurs de l’Ontario pour trois jours d’apprentissage et de partage à Niagara Falls. Soyez parmi nous!

 

BIT14 Logo.png

 

http://www.bringittogether.ca

 

The program for the event is posted for the world to see at:

 

Le programme de l’événement est affiché à l’adresse :

http://lanyrd.com/2014/ecoo14/

 

209 sessions of all sorts will be offered over the three days given by educators from all areas of the province.  You’ll see initiatives in classrooms just like yours and walk away with inspiration and ideas about how you can enjoy the same successes.  Wednesday is devoted to hands-on workshops, including the fabulous Ontario designed Minds on Media, with Thursday and Friday a mixture of keynote speakers and 50 minute sessions.

 

209 sessions de toutes sortes seront offertes pendant les trois jours. Ces sessions seront animées par des éducateurs provenant de toutes les régions de la province. Vous découvrirez des initiatives qui se passent dans des classes comme la vôtre, et vous repartirez avec l’inspiration et les idées qui vous permettront de jouir des mêmes succès. L’horaire de mercredi propose des ateliers pratiques, y compris le concept ontarien Minds on Media. L’horaire de jeudi et vendredi présente un mélange de conférenciers et des sessions pratiques d’une durée de 50 minutes chacunes.

 

And, of course, don’t forget the social events – receptions (Wednesday featuring the Kung Fu Lawyers), Minecraft, Photowalk by the Falls, Run with Alana, Jam Session, and ad hoc meetings that just spring up and take advantage of the location and also the Learning Space.

 

N’oubliez pas les événements sociaux – réceptions (Mercredi réception avec Kung Fu Lawyers), Minecraft, Photowalk près des chutes, la course avec Alana, Jam Session, et les rencontres spontannées vous permettront de tirer profit de l’emplacement pittoresque tout en apprenant!

 

An expanded exhibition hall will let you experience the latest and greatest and to talk with representatives.

 

Une salle d’exposition élargie vous permettra de découvrir des nouveautés et de jaser avec les représentants des commanditaires.

 

Much of what we know about children using technology in education comes from the research and work from Seymour Papert and his work at the MIT Media Lab.  Wednesday features an opening keynote address from Artemis Papert and Brian Silverman.

 

Une grande partie de nos connaissances au sujet de l’utilisation des technologies éducatives chez les jeunes vient de la recherche et des travaux de Seymour Papert et son travail au MIT Media Lab. Mercredi, nous vous proposons une conférence d’ouverture de Artemis Papert et Brian Silverman.

 

If you’ve ever searched for free educational resources, you’ve undoubtedly ended up on the Free Tech 4 Teachers website.  http://freetech4teachers.com/  Listen to Richard Byrne’s keynote and join him for a breakout session on Thursday.

 

Si vous avez déjà effectué une recherche pour les ressources éducatives libres, vous avez sans doute fini par trouver le site http://freetech4teachers.com/ Richard Byrne, auteur de ce site, prononcera la conférence d’ouverture et offrira une session de travail jeudi.

 

Ron Canuel speaks Friday morning and brings a global perspective from his 34 years in Canadian Education.  Ron is currently the president and CEO of the Canadian Education Association.  Ron will also specifically address the French educators at the conference.

 

Ron Canuel prononcera la conférence d’ouverture du vendredi matin. Il apporte une perspective globale nourrie de ses 34 ans en éducation au Canada. Ron est actuellement président et chef de l’Association canadienne d’éducation. Ron offrira ses commentaires, en français, aux éducateurs francophones lors de la conférence.

 

Bring IT, Together concludes with a keynote address from George Couros, the “Principal of Change”.  Supporting leadership and leaders, George will inspire us to use our learning and lead Ontario schools to even greater things.  http://georgecouros.ca/

 

La conférence Bring IT, Together se terminera par une allocution de George Couros, le »directeur du changement». Il nous parlera du leadership en action et nous incitera à utiliser nos expertises afin de permettre aux écoles de l’Ontario à effectuer un virage à l’ère numérique en douceur. http://georgecouros.ca/

 

For the second year in a row, ECOO and OASBO-ICT join forces to offer three days of incredible learning surrounding the use of technology in the classroom.  Plan now to join us in Niagara Falls, November 5-7.

 

Pour la deuxième année consécutive, ECOO et OASBO-TIC unissent leurs forces pour offrir trois jours d’apprentissage incroyable sur l’utilisation des technologies en salle de classe. Planifiez maintenant de vous joindre à nous à Niagara Falls, du 5 au 7 novembre.

 

Follow the conference

 

Suivez la conférence

 

Questions?  Contact email is conference@ecoo.org

 

Questions? Notre adresse courriel est conference@ecoo.org