Fantasy Building(s)

If you haven’t already, you need to take a look at this blog post.

Fantastic Imaginary Buildings Created by Splicing Together Found Photos

Jim Kazanjian is a professional photographer and has put together some amazing imagery.  The end result is actually a compilation of other various images, done in black and white.  The results are spectacular.  Visit his website for even more.

Now, I would not presume to be able to create anything even close to what he’s able to do.

However, looking at his work has lead me to think that I need to play around with the concept.  As my friend Dave used to say, there’s got to be a workshop in there somewhere.

I think of the various things that I’ve done with Photoshop workshops in the past – colourizing black and white photos, editing out street signs, placing myself in wild and exotic locations…

The whole point of doing these sort of activities in workshops is to encourage teachers to try the same activities with their students to become better image creators.  As I look at Kazanjian’s art, I would absolutely bring it to students’ attention and then perhaps try to replicate his artistry.

  • Create fantasy buildings;
  • Create a visual summary of holiday pictures;
  • Create a one picture image that tells the world all about their school and what’s inside;
  • Create a celebration of student achievements into a visual portfolio…

The ideas come so easily.  Students can be so creative and innovative given the chance.

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7 thoughts on “Fantasy Building(s)”

  1. Another inspirational Photoshop user is “Parée”, whose flickr website can be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/pareeerica/.

    What I especially love about her flickr postings (other than they are so amazing) is that she always provides links to the sources of her material.

    One of my assignments in my Communications Technology class is to have my students replicate any one of Parée’s images. I find the assignment to be very self-motivating and it encourages students to explore their creative side.

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  2. What a wonderful find, Doug — and, as I reflect further on it at this moment, an example of how something great can be created from found objects, given the time, motivation, and a free hand. This is recycling at its best.

    As soon as I read your post and followed the links, I immediately knew that I wanted to try this — and that others, too would be interested in following suit. I have just now submitted this as a Visual Assignment to the ds106 Assignment Bank, a continually growing, re-incorporating hyper-linked idea-collage of its own.

    … and Peter, I will immediately take a look at Parée’s work. Attribution to source material is an important thing to think about and to model for learners and creators. There is a wealth of great ideas in the ds106 Assignment Bank — where creativity is the intent, and “make some Art, dagnabbit!” is the (tidied up) mantra.

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