The Sweater

Bill Belsey knows his Canadiana.  I mean, how many people could make the Twitter handle @Inukshuk work?  I met Bill when we both were presenting at the Teacher2Teacher conference in Alberta.  We had a great conversation there about First Nations and I’ve followed him on Twitter ever since.

In my Twitter stream today, I caught this…

It’s one of my favourite short stories.  It’s based on the book by Roch Carrier and I only knew about the digital version on the NFB site.  http://www.nfb.ca/film/sweater/

But, Bill pointed out there is a version available on YouTube.

If you’re a Canadiens fan, you need to enjoy this video over and over!

What was even cooler was that the back and forth led to even more interesting discussions.

I mean…would today’s student understand the reference to Eaton’s?  Growing up, that certainly was a reality for me.  Or Simpson’s?  Or watching a radio?

Thanks so much for the original message, Bill.  It started a wonderful chain of thoughts with me.

p.s. I always wondered what number was on that Maple Leafs’ jersey?  10?  7?  4?  27?

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5 thoughts on “The Sweater

  1. It might have been Johnny Bower’s number (would that time period be right – or is Carrier too old for that? or would a kid where a goalie’s jersey?). We got lucky driving home in the car one day recently, and CBC was playing Carrier reading the story. He’s got a great cadence for it, and I find when I read it out loud that I’m using his voice. One of the best baby gifts my oldest got was a copy of the book autographed to him. It’s such a great story, and my Anglican priest hubby gets a kick out of the end!

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  2. I never thought of number 1, Lisa. That certainly would have been an option – and a good one at that! Make sure that you child hangs on to the book – if he ever gets a job as a teacher, that will be a prize for the bookshelf. As for the ending, I was in a class once where the topic of discussion got into the importance of the Roman Catholic church in French culture. Very interesting to hear the students talk about it. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

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