Call for Proposals: Annual CSTA Computer Science & Information Technology Symposium


CS&IT 2011 — Call for Proposals: Annual CSTA Computer Science & Information Technology Symposium

The Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) invites you to participate in the 11th Annual Computer Science & Information Technology Conference. This event will be held July 11-13, 2011, in New York, NY.

The CS&IT 2011 Program Committee seeks proposal submissions related to the practice of teaching and learning computer science and information technology in K-12. Proposals will be accepted for one-hour presentations or panels or for three-hour workshops.

The deadline for proposals is February 1, 2011. Review of proposals will occur shortly thereafter and notification of decision will be made on or about March 1, 2011. Successful proposers should expect to be asked to submit a reasonably final copy by June 20 so as to minimize any last minute complications.

We desire a varied program of interest to all teachers of computing in K-12 education. All submission will be evaluated on the following criteria:
· technical quality,
· writing and presentation,
· relevance to CS&IT (focus on K-12 computer science or information technology).

Proposers are required to:
· identify all presenters
· provide an overview of the session
· describe the intended audience (level, knowledge, …)
· indicate session activity in sufficient detail for an informed decision
· discuss presenter background and presentation experience

All proposals will be submitted through the online symposium submission system that can be found at:

https://www.softconf.com/b/csta2011/

If you encounter a problem, contact Duncan Buell at: buell@acm.org.

Presenters at the Symposium will have the use of a computer projector and screen. Proposers should describe any unusual infrastructure, A/V equipment, or lab facility needed; it may be possible to accommodate such requests but this cannot be guaranteed.

Additional conference details can be found at:

http://www.csitsymposium.org/

We look forward to receiving your proposals and to your attendance at the symposium.

CS&IT 2011 is generously sponsored by the Anita Borg Institute, Google, and Microsoft Research.

Chris Stephenson, chris.stephenson@comcast.net
Josh Block, JoBlock@ccsd.ws
Duncan Buell, buell@acm.org
Doug Peterson, doug@dougpeterson.ca
Philip East, east@cs.uni.edu
Betsy Frederick, betsy.frederick@gmail.com
Dave Reed, DaveReed@creighton.edu

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A Tale of Two Newspapers


A few months ago, paper.li hit the internet by storm.  Paper.li is a free service that creates an online newspaper packed with content that is provided by your followers or a list that you created, all based on your unique Twitter account.  The resulting unique “newpaper” features some of the interesting posts that people have sent to their part of the Twitter stream.  What it does for the end user is highlight stories and also provides a summary of what’s happening when, for some reason, you’re not connected to these accounts 24/7.

The concept intrigued me and I created my own paper.li based upon the users that I follow.  Nicely divided into sections that the service determines, it provides a nicely rounded summary of those I follow.  I only follow people that have some interest to me and the resulting newspaper is of great interest.  While my primary interest in using Twitter is connecting with other educators, I do have what I consider to be a nice bit of entrepreneurs, news and sports sources, a few celebrities, and just plain folks that I find interesting.

The “Doug Peterson Community News” is just an interesting collection of the thoughts of the over 2500 interesting sources from my online community that I read.

It’s automatically published early in the morning and I pour over the contents with a coffee much like I would with its paper cousin.  Like a traditional newspaper, its content is wide ranging.  The title page supposedly posts the best of the best and then the generated sections lets me dig deeper into the content.

I also have a second newspaper that’s created and published about 3 hours later.

From the Twitter list that I’ve created and called “Ontario Educators”, a summary of what Ontario educators are posting appears in this edition.  What I’m constantly amazed by is the rich content that educators from the province are writing and reading and sharing.

I think that, in the back of my mind, I had expected the content from both of these to be quite similar.  While there are some overlapping articles, the entirety of each is completely different.  I skim the headlines in both papers and regularly do followup to the linked articles because of the content that’s shared.

The downside?  If you recall, there was a furor because some people were offended since paper.li does a shout out of 2 or three of the sources when it makes your paper.  While some people get a hoot from being recognized, others considered the acknowledgement as a form of Twitter spam.  To the developer’s credit, they wrote some code that would allow those folks to opt out of being acknowledged for their sharing.  I still struggle with the concept but such is life.

The editions are archived so that you can return to previous issues if you need to for some reason.  I’ve tried it a couple of times and it works nicely but I don’t use it often.  I think that’s testament to the fact that Twitter is all about now and the present and less about what happened in the past.

I really enjoy both of these publications and I’d like to thank those who create the content for me just by sharing whatever it is that they’re reading.  It’s a powerful wealth of resources.  I can think of all kinds of ways to create customized newspapers for reading in virtually any kind of classroom environment.  A Computer Science daily.  A Digital Storytelling daily.  A Science daily….

The only downfall?  Well, it’s embarrassing when I spend all the time to create a blog post expressing my thoughts of the day and the editors at paper.li elect not to run with my story.  How sad is that?

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